Haplogroup Q-L54

Haplogroup Q-L54 is a subclade of Y-DNA haplogroup Q-L53. Q1a3a-L54 is defined by the presence of the L54 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP).

Haplogroup Q-L54
Possible place of originEurasia
AncestorQ-L53
DescendantsQ-L330, Q-M3, Q-M971, Q-Z780, Q-L804
Defining mutationsL54

DistributionEdit

Q-L54 has descendants across Western and Central Europe, the North and East of Asia, and the Americas. It includes two of the major pre-Columbian paternal lineages in the Americas: Q-M3 and Q-M971. The boy Anzick-1, who lived 12,600 years ago and was found in the state of Montana, has a Y-chromosome that refers to haplogroup Q-M971 (Q-L54*(xM3)).[1][2][3] Q-L54 descendant lines also include two Eurasian paternal lineages, the Central Asian Q-L330 lineage and the Scandinavian Q-L804. [4] Q-L804 is Scandinavian and the TMRCA is just over 3000 years.[5] Haplogroup Q‐L54 is dominant in two North Siberian populations, the Kets and Selkups, with frequencies of 97.7% and 66.7%, respectively.[6]

Associated SNP'sEdit

Q-L54 is currently defined by the L54 SNP alone.

SubgroupsEdit

Current status of the polygentic tree for Q-L54 is published by pinotti et. al in the article Y Chromosome Sequences Reveal a Short Beringian Standstill, Rapid Expansion, and early Population structure of Native American Founders. Calibrated phylogeny of Y haplogroup Q-L54.[7]

  • L54
    • Q-L330
    • Q-MPB001 (18.9 kya)
      • Q-CTS1780
      • Q-M930
        • Q-L804
        • Q-M3 (15.0 kya)
          • Q-Y4308
          • Q-M848 (14.9 kya)

The 2013 version of the polygentic tree for haplogroup Q-L54 made by Thomas Krahn at the Genomic Research Center: Proposed Tree.

  • L54
    • M3, L341.2
      • M19
      • M194
      • M199, P106, P292
      • PAGES104, PAGES126
      • PAGES131
      • L663
      • SA01
      • L766, L767
      • L883, L884, L885, L886, L887
      • L888, L889, L890, L891
    • L804, L805
      • L807
    • Z780
      • L191
      • L400, L401
    • L456
    • L568, L569, L570, L571
      • L567
      • L619.1
    • L330, L334
      • L329, L332, L333

See alsoEdit

Y-DNA Q-M242 SubcladesEdit

Y-DNA Backbone TreeEdit

Phylogenetic tree of human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups [χ 1][χ 2]
"Y-chromosomal Adam"
A00 A0-T [χ 3]
A0 A1 [χ 4]
A1a A1b
A1b1 BT
B CT
DE CF
D E C F
F1  F2  F3  GHIJK
G HIJK
IJK H
IJ K
I   J     LT [χ 5]       K2 [χ 6]
L     T    K2a [χ 7]        K2b [χ 8]     K2c     K2d K2e [χ 9]  
K-M2313 [χ 10]     K2b1 [χ 11] P [χ 12]
NO   S [χ 13]  M [χ 14]    P1     P2
N O Q R

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ M. Rasmussen et al. The genome of a Late Pleistocene human from a Clovis burial site in western Montana // Nature. 2014. V. 506. P. 225–229.
  2. ^ Jennifer A. Raff & Deborah A. Bolnick. Palaeogenomics: Genetic roots of the first Americans // Nature. 2014. V. 506. P. 162–163.
  3. ^ Kivisild, Toomas (2017-03-04). "The study of human Y chromosome variation through ancient DNA". Human Genetics. Springer Nature. 136 (5): 529–546. doi:10.1007/s00439-017-1773-z. ISSN 0340-6717. PMC 5418327. PMID 28260210.
  4. ^ Kivisild, Toomas (2017-03-04). "The study of human Y chromosome variation through ancient DNA". Human Genetics. Springer Nature. 136 (5): 529–546. doi:10.1007/s00439-017-1773-z. ISSN 0340-6717. PMC 5418327. PMID 28260210.
  5. ^ https://yfull.com/tree/Q-L804/
  6. ^ Karafet, Tatiana M.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Savina, Olga V.; Hallmark, Brian; Hammer, Michael F. (2018). "Siberian genetic diversity reveals complex origins of the Samoyedic-speaking populations". American Journal of Human Biology. Wiley. 30 (6): e23194. doi:10.1002/ajhb.23194. ISSN 1042-0533. PMID 30408262.
  7. ^ Pinotti, Thomaz; Bergström, Anders; Geppert, Maria; Bawn, Matt; Ohasi, Dominique; Shi, Wentao; Lacerda, Daniela R.; Solli, Arne; Norstedt, Jakob; Reed, Kate; Dawtry, Kim; González-Andrade, Fabricio; Paz-y-Miño, Cesar; Revollo, Susana; Cuellar, Cinthia; Jota, Marilza S.; Santos, José E.; Ayub, Qasim; Kivisild, Toomas; Sandoval, José R.; Fujita, Ricardo; Xue, Yali; Roewer, Lutz; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris (2018). "Y Chromosome Sequences Reveal a Short Beringian Standstill, Rapid Expansion, and early Population structure of Native American Founders". Current Biology. Elsevier BV. 29 (1): 149–157.e3. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.11.029. ISSN 0960-9822. PMID 30581024.

External linksEdit