Handball at the 2016 Summer Olympics

The handball tournaments at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro was held from 6 to 21 August at the Future Arena in the Barra Olympic Park.[1] The tournaments were won by Denmark in the men's competition and Russia for the women's tournament. The French teams for both competitions finished with the silver medal, and the bronze went to Germany and Norway, respectively.

Handball at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Handball, Rio 2016.png
Tournament details
Host country Brazil
Dates6–21 August
Teams24 (from 4 confederations)
Venue(s)(in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Denmark (men)
 Russia (women)
Runner-up France (men)
 France (women)
Third place Germany (men)
 Norway (women)
Fourth place Poland (men)
 Netherlands (women)
Next

FormatEdit

The handball event at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played between 6 and 21 August 2016 at the Future Arena in the Barra Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.[2] The Games consisted of two tournaments, one each for men and women's teams.[3] The events featured twelve teams, who qualified for the tournament from a series of preceding tournaments, as well as the host country Brazil. The draw for the championships took place on 29 April 2016, and split the teams into round robin groups of six.[3] Four teams from each group qualified for the knockout rounds, and the winner and runner-up receiving gold and silver medals respectively. A third-placed play-off was contested for the bronze medal.[3]

Matches were played over 60 minutes, with two points being awarded to winners and a single point to draws in the group stage.[2] Teams tied for points in the group stage featured a series of tiebreaker criteria including head-to-head points, goal difference and goals scored.[2][4]

Competition scheduleEdit

G Group stage ¼ Quarter-finals ½ Semi-finals B Bronze medal match F Final
Date
Event
Sat 6 Sun 7 Mon 8 Tue 9 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21
Men G G G G G ¼ ½ B F
Women G G G G G ¼ ½ B F

QualificationEdit

Qualification for the Olympics were awarded based on a series of tournaments before the event between January 2015 and April 2016. Each National Olympic Committee were allowed to enter one team each for men and women. The host country was guaranteed an entry in each event, as was the winner of the 2015 World Men's Handball Championship. Four more spots were awarded to the winners of continental qualification tournaments for Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Finally, six places were awarded through three Olympic qualification tournaments. These tournaments were open to the top six teams from the World Championship that had not already qualified as well as six entrants determined through a complex continental qualification algorithm. The twelve teams were divided into three round-robin tournaments featuring four teams, with the top two teams in each tournament qualifying.[5][6]

Men's qualificationEdit

Mean of qualification Date Host Vacancies Qualified
Host nation 2 October 2009   Copenhagen 1   Brazil
2015 World Championship 15 January – 1 February 2015   Qatar 1   France
2015 Pan American Games 16–25 July 2015   Toronto 1   Argentina
2015 Asian Qualification Tournament 14–27 November 2015   Doha 1   Qatar
2016 European Championship 15–31 January 2016   Poland 1   Germany
2016 African Championship 21–30 January 2016   Cairo 1   Egypt
2016 Olympic Qualification Tournaments 8–10 April 2016   Gdańsk 2   Poland
  Tunisia
  Malmö 2   Slovenia
  Sweden
  Herning 2   Denmark
  Croatia
Total 12

Women's qualificationEdit

Mean of qualification Date Host Vacancies Qualified
Host nation 2 October 2009   Copenhagen 1   Brazil
2014 European Championship 7–21 December 2014   Zagreb
  Budapest
1   Spain[1]
2015 African Qualification Tournament 19–21 March 2015   Luanda 1   Angola
2015 Pan American Games 15–24 July 2015   Toronto 1   Argentina
2015 Asian Qualification Tournament 20–25 October 2015   Nagoya 1   South Korea
2015 World Championship 5–20 December 2015   Denmark 1   Norway
2016 Olympic Qualification Tournaments 18–20 March 2016   Metz 2   Netherlands
  France
  Aarhus 2   Romania
  Montenegro
  Astrakhan 2   Russia
  Sweden
Total 12

^ 1. Norway won the European Championship, ensuring its qualification. Norway later also won the 2015 World Championship title, which took precedence in the qualification path. Therefore, the European Championship's runner-up, Spain, received the European continental tournament berth.

SummaryEdit

Men's competitionEdit

The semi-finals saw France defeat Germany by a single point, after having a three point lead at half time.[7] The other semi-final between Poland and Denmark went to extra-time, with the scores tied at 25-25 where Denmark won the match 29-28.[8] The bronze medal match was held between Poland and Germany. The Polish side started hotly and had a 8-5 lead, before the Germans came back and held a 17-13 lead at half-time.[9] Germany pushed the lead to seven points after the third quarter, and eventually won the match 31-25 to win the bronze medal.[10][9]

The Danish side met the French team in the final.[11] Leading at 16-14 after the first half, Denmark retained their lead to win the match 28-26.[10] This was Denmark's first medal in the handball event at the Olympics, having reached their best, a fourth place in 1984.[12] Danish player Jannick Green "dreamt about one day making" the final, and the team "worked really hard and played well".[12] The result put an end to the French period of dominance at the Olympics, having won the two prior events in 2008 and 2012.[13] French player Luka Karabatic commented "When you’ve got a medal around your neck it’s a little bit different and you can see what you achieved as a team... Getting a silver medal is something unbelievable."[12][14]

ResultsEdit

Men's competitionEdit

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.[15]

Group stageEdit

The teams were divided into two groups of six nations, playing every team in their group once. Two points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top four teams per group qualified for the quarter-finals.

Group AEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Croatia 5 4 0 1 147 134 +13 8[a] Quarter-finals
2   France 5 4 0 1 152 126 +26 8[a]
3   Denmark 5 3 0 2 136 127 +9 6
4   Qatar 5 2 1 2 122 127 −5 5
5   Argentina 5 1 0 4 110 126 −16 2
6   Tunisia 5 0 1 4 118 145 −27 1
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Croatia 29–28 France
Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Germany 5 4 0 1 153 141 +12 8[a] Quarter-finals
2   Slovenia 5 4 0 1 137 126 +11 8[a]
3   Brazil (H) 5 2 1 2 141 150 −9 5
4   Poland 5 2 0 3 139 140 −1 4
5   Egypt 5 1 1 3 129 143 −14 3
6   Sweden 5 1 0 4 132 131 +1 2
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
(H) Host
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Slovenia 25–28 Germany

Knockout stageEdit

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsGold medal
 
          
 
17 August
 
 
  Croatia27
 
19 August
 
  Poland30
 
  Poland28
 
17 August
 
  Denmark (OT)29
 
  Denmark37
 
21 August
 
  Slovenia30
 
    Denmark28
 
17 August
 
    France26
 
  Brazil27
 
19 August
 
  France34
 
  France29
 
17 August
 
  Germany28 Bronze medal
 
  Germany34
 
21 August
 
  Qatar22
 
4th   Poland25
 
 
    Germany31
 

Women's competitionEdit

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.

Group stageEdit

The teams were divided into two groups of six nations, playing every team in their group once. Two points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top four teams per group qualified for the quarter-finals.

Group AEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Brazil (H) 5 4 0 1 138 117 +21 8 Quarter-finals
2   Norway 5 4 0 1 141 121 +20 8
3   Spain 5 3 0 2 125 116 +9 6
4   Angola 5 2 0 3 116 128 −12 4
5   Romania 5 2 0 3 108 119 −11 4
6   Montenegro 5 0 0 5 107 134 −27 0
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
(H) Host
Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Russia 5 5 0 0 165 147 +18 10 Quarter-finals
2   France 5 4 0 1 118 93 +25 8
3   Sweden 5 2 1 2 150 141 +9 5
4   Netherlands 5 1 2 2 135 135 0 4
5   South Korea 5 1 1 3 130 136 −6 3
6   Argentina 5 0 0 5 101 147 −46 0
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.

Knockout stageEdit

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsGold medal
 
          
 
16 August
 
 
  Brazil23
 
18 August
 
  Netherlands32
 
  Netherlands23
 
16 August
 
  France24
 
  Spain26
 
20 August
 
  France (OT)27
 
  France19
 
16 August
 
  Russia22
 
  Sweden20
 
18 August
 
  Norway33
 
  Norway37
 
16 August
 
  Russia (OT)38 Bronze medal
 
  Russia31
 
20 August
 
  Angola27
 
  Netherlands26
 
 
  Norway36
 

Medal summaryEdit

MedalistsEdit

Below is a full list of players awarded medals at the championships.[16][17]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
details
  Denmark (DEN)
Niklas Landin Jacobsen
Mads Christiansen
Mads Mensah Larsen
Casper Ulrich Mortensen
Jesper Nøddesbo
Jannick Green
Lasse Svan Hansen
Rene Toft Hansen
Henrik Mollgaard
Kasper Sondergaard
Henrik Toft Hansen
Mikkel Hansen
Morten Olsen
Michael Damgaard
  France (FRA)
Olivier Nyokas
Daniel Narcisse
Vincent Gérard
Nikola Karabatic
Kentin Mahé
Mathieu Grébille
Thierry Omeyer
Timothey N'Guessan
Luc Abalo
Cedric Sorhaindo
Michael Guigou
Luka Karabatic
Ludovic Fabregas
Adrien Dipanda
Valentin Porte
  Germany (GER)
Uwe Gensheimer
Finn Lemke
Patrick Wiencek
Tobias Reichmann
Fabian Wiede
Silvio Heinevetter
Hendrik Pekeler
Steffen Weinhold
Martin Strobel
Patrick Groetzki
Kai Häfner
Andreas Wolff
Julius Kühn
Christian Dissinger
Paul Drux
Women
details
  Russia (RUS)
Anna Sedoykina
Polina Kuznetsova
Daria Dmitrieva
Anna Sen
Olga Akopyan
Anna Vyakhireva
Marina Sudakova
Vladlena Bobrovnikova
Victoria Zhilinskayte
Yekaterina Marennikova
Irina Bliznova
Ekaterina Ilina
Maya Petrova
Tatyana Yerokhina
Victoriya Kalinina
  France (FRA)
Laura Glauser
Blandine Dancette
Camille Ayglon
Allison Pineau
Laurisa Landre
Grace Zaadi
Marie Prouvensier
Amandine Leynaud
Manon Houette
Siraba Dembélé
Chloé Bulleux
Béatrice Edwige
Estelle Nze Minko
Gnonsiane Niombla
Alexandra Lacrabère
  Norway (NOR)
Kari Aalvik Grimsbø
Mari Molid
Emilie Hegh Arntzen
Ida Alstad
Veronica Kristiansen
Heidi Løke
Nora Mørk
Stine Bredal Oftedal
Marit Malm Frafjord
Katrine Lunde
Linn-Kristin Riegelhuth Koren
Amanda Kurtović
Camilla Herrem
Sanna Solberg

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Olympic Handball". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on 24 February 2016. Retrieved 7 March 2016.
  2. ^ a b c "Olympic Handball". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on 26 August 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Draw for Rio 2016 Handball Tournament". ihf.info. 16 February 2016. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Results Book – Handball" (pdf). library.olympic.org. Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Rio 2016 – IHF Handball Qualification System" (PDF). IHF. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 March 2015. Retrieved 25 December 2014.
  6. ^ "International Handball Federation > Draw for the 2016 Olympic Handball Tournaments staged in Rio". archive.ihf.info. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  7. ^ "France 29-28 Germany" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  8. ^ "Denmark 29-28 Poland ET" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 January 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  9. ^ a b Verschueren, Gianni. "Olympic Handball 2016: Men's Team Medal Winners, Scores and Results". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on 24 August 2016. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  10. ^ a b "Denmark beat France to handball gold". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 26 October 2020. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  11. ^ "Denmark 28-26 France" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 January 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  12. ^ a b c "International Handball Federation > Denmark end France's grip on Olympic title". archive.ihf.info. Archived from the original on 13 August 2020. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  13. ^ Ulmer, Alexandra. "Handball: Delighted Denmark beat French champions to win first gold". U.S. Archived from the original on 29 November 2018. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  14. ^ "Great Danes surprise champions France to win men's handball gold - Olympic News". olympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  15. ^ https://www.espn.com/olympics/summer/2016/results/_/discipline/24/event/213}}
  16. ^ IOC. "Rio 2016 handball men Results - Olympic handball". Olympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  17. ^ IOC. "Rio 2016 handball women Results - Olympic handball". Olympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 2 August 2021.

External linksEdit