Hampton, New Jersey

Hampton is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,401,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 145 (-9.4%) from the 1,546 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 31 (+2.0%) from the 1,515 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Hampton is part of the Lehigh Valley metropolitan area.

Hampton, New Jersey
Borough of Hampton
Entering Hampton along County Route 635
Entering Hampton along County Route 635
Map of Hampton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hampton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hampton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hampton, New Jersey
Hampton is located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Hampton
Hampton
Location in Hunterdon County
Hampton is located in New Jersey
Hampton
Hampton
Location in New Jersey
Hampton is located in the United States
Hampton
Hampton
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°42′16″N 74°58′17″W / 40.70457°N 74.971525°W / 40.70457; -74.971525Coordinates: 40°42′16″N 74°58′17″W / 40.70457°N 74.971525°W / 40.70457; -74.971525[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
IncorporatedFebruary 20, 1895 as Junction Borough
RenamedFebruary 11, 1909 as Hampton Borough
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorTodd Shaner (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkLinda Leidner[5] "</ref>
Area
 • Total1.52 sq mi (3.93 km2)
 • Land1.51 sq mi (3.90 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)  0.79%
 • Rank450th of 565 in state
17th of 26 in county[1]
Elevation417 ft (127 m)
Population
 • Total1,401
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
1,318
 • Rank519th of 566 in state
20th of 26 in county[12][13]
 • Density915.1/sq mi (353.3/km2)
  • Rank396th of 566 in state
12th of 26 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)908[16]
FIPS code3401929460[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885243[1][19]
Websitewww.hamptonboro.org

What is now Hampton was originally incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature as Junction Borough on February 20, 1895, from portions of both Lebanon Township and Bethlehem Township, based on the results of a referendum held on the previous day. By a resolution of the borough council, the name was changed to Hampton as of February 11, 1909. In 1931, additional territory was annexed from both Glen Gardner borough and Bethlehem Township.[21]

Located on the banks of the Musconetcong River, Hampton was first settled in 1800. In 1880, the town consisted of a store, hotel, cabinet manufacturer, blacksmith, wheelwright shop, grist mill, school house and about 25 dwellings. Hampton was once known as "Junction" because the Central Railroad of New Jersey and the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad crossed through here.[22]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.52 square miles (3.93 km2), including 1.51 square miles (3.90 km2) of land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) of water (0.79%).[1][2]

Hampton Junction is an unincorporated community within Hampton.[citation needed]

The borough borders the municipalities of Bethlehem Township, Glen Gardner Borough and Lebanon Township in Hunterdon County; and Washington Township in Warren County.[23][24][25]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900998
1910914−8.4%
19209160.2%
1930861−6.0%
19408640.3%
195097512.8%
19601,13516.4%
19701,38622.1%
19801,61416.5%
19901,515−6.1%
20001,5462.0%
20101,401−9.4%
2019 (est.)1,318[11][26]−5.9%
Population sources:
1900-1920[27] 1900-1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1930-1990[30]
2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010Edit

The 2010 United States census counted 1,401 people, 570 households, and 368 families in the borough. The population density was 915.1 per square mile (353.3/km2). There were 612 housing units at an average density of 399.7 per square mile (154.3/km2). The racial makeup was 92.29% (1,293) White, 2.50% (35) Black or African American, 0.71% (10) Native American, 1.86% (26) Asian, 0.07% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (14) from other races, and 1.57% (22) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.35% (75) of the population.[8]

Of the 570 households, 29.3% had children under the age of 18; 50.4% were married couples living together; 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 35.4% were non-families. Of all households, 30.2% were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

21.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 101.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 97.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $63,681 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,751) and the median family income was $82,396 (+/- $19,162). Males had a median income of $54,500 (+/- $9,914) versus $33,594 (+/- $8,886) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,468 (+/- $3,353). About 10.2% of families and 10.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.3% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 1,546 people, 559 households, and 377 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,006.8 people per square mile (387.6/km2). There were 574 housing units at an average density of 373.8 per square mile (143.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.01% White, 4.98% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.97% Asian, 0.78% from other races, and 1.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.85% of the population.[31][32]

There were 559 households, out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.20.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.7% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 106.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.0 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,111, and the median income for a family was $64,583. Males had a median income of $45,096 versus $32,000 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,440. About 7.1% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.1% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Hampton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[34] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The borough form of government used by Hampton is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[35][36]

As of 2020, the mayor of Hampton Borough is Republican Todd Shaner, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Hampton Borough Council are Council President Robert T. Wotanowski (R, 2023), John R. Drummond (R, 2022), Rob E. Celentano (R, 2023), Douglas E. Rega (R, 2024), Carroll L. Swenson (R, 2022) and Jeffrey A. Tampier (R, 2024).[3][37][38][39][40][41][42]

In May 2013, the borough council selected James Cregar from a list of three candidates recommended by the Republican municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Mayor Peter Winter following his resignation in May, at which time Cregar had become acting mayor.[43]

MeetingsEdit

  • Borough Council: 2nd and 4th Monday of each month at 8:00 pm - Borough Hall
  • Board of Adjustment, Planning Board: 3rd Thursday of each month at 7:30 pm - Borough Hall
  • Board of Health: 1st and 3rd Monday of each month at 8:00 pm - Borough Hall
  • Rescue Squad: 1st Wednesday of each month 7:30 pm (General Body Meeting) 3rd Wednesday of each month 7:00 pm (Drill Night) - Rescue Squad Building

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Hampton is located in the 7th Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[9][45][46]

For the 117th United States Congress. New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Tom Malinowski (D, East Amwell Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[48] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[49][50]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[51]

Hunterdon County is governed by a Board of Chosen Commissioners comprised of five members who are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the commissioners select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director, each for a one-year term.[52][53] As of 2022, Hunterdon County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director John E. Lanza (R; Raritan Township, term as commissioner and as director ends December 31, 2022),[54] Deputy Director Zachary T. Rich (R; West Amwell Township, term as commissioner and as deputy director ends 2022),[55] J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2024),[56] Susan Soloway (R; Franklin Township, 2024),[57] and Shaun C. Van Doren (R; Tewksbury Township, 2023).[58][59][60] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2026),[61][62] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2022)[63][64] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2023).[65][66][53][67]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 884 registered voters in Hampton, of which 182 (20.6%) were registered as Democrats, 270 (30.5%) were registered as Republicans and 432 (48.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 54.1% of the vote (326 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.4% (262 votes), and other candidates with 2.5% (15 votes), among the 612 ballots cast by the borough's 915 registered voters (9 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 66.9%.[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 53.4% of the vote (355 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.9% (292 votes) and other candidates with 2.1% (14 votes), among the 665 ballots cast by the borough's 894 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.4%.[71] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 58.6% of the vote (379 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.6% (256 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (7 votes), among the 647 ballots cast by the borough's 861 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.1.[72]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 72.0% of the vote (272 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 25.1% (95 votes), and other candidates with 2.9% (11 votes), among the 388 ballots cast by the borough's 918 registered voters (10 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.3%.[73][74] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.8% of the vote (310 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.9% (111 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.4% (39 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (2 votes), among the 464 ballots cast by the borough's 879 registered voters, yielding a 52.8% turnout.[75]

Public servicesEdit

Emergency servicesEdit

Fire Department

The Hampton Fire Company is an all-volunteer fire department that was originally established in 1899 as the Junction Fire Company after the borough completed a water system with fire hydrants. In 1909, the name changed to the Musconetcong Fire Company and then later to the Hampton Fire Company. The fire company built the current Borough Hall/Fire House for the borough in 1951. The Borough occupied the east side of the building and the fire company used the west side. In 1981, the fire company expanded the building by adding a second floor for borough use and the Fire Company took over the entire lower floor.[76]

The Fire Company currently has as active apparatuses a 1959 International Harvester fire engine, a 1987 Emergency One Fire Engine, a 2000 Pierce Fire Engine, Engine 13-1 is a 2000 Pierce Dash pumper with a 8 man cab,2000 GPM pump and a 1000 Gallon tank. , a 1995 Chevy Suburban command vehicle, a 2013 Ford Expedition Command Vehicle, and a 1978 GMC Rescue Truck. There are over 40 active members on the rolls which includes an active Junior Firefighter program for young people age 14 and over.

Emergency Squad

In 1955, the Hampton Fire Company selected one of its members, Gilbert Riddle, to organize an emergency squad. With the backing of the Fire Company, the present squad became operational in 1956. The Fire Company purchased the first ambulance, which was housed in the firehouse until the squad's permanent facilities were completed. On August 6, 1966 the dedication of the permanent home of the Emergency Squad took place. The Hampton Emergency Squad incorporated itself in 1976, becoming independent of the Fire Company, however its name did not change. In January 1978, the squad established an auxiliary membership. This membership is made up of people who wish to help the Hampton Fire Company Emergency Squad in its endeavors to provide the finest in first aid protection.[citation needed] A new GMC rescue truck was purchased in 1978. It was specially equipped with four-wheel drive and quartz spotlights for better lighting during accidents and fires. The rescue truck is still in service with the fire company today. The old 1968 Cadillac ambulance was replaced in 1982 by a Braun ambulance, and was later used as a service vehicle. A Ford Horton ambulance was purchased in 1987, and in 1992 another Ford Horton ambulance was added. An additional bay was added to the building in 1979 to provide storage of emergency vehicles and equipment. The Hampton Emergency Squad dedicated their building to the memory of Charles Tampier and William Deemer in 1982 in recognition of their exceptional service to our squad and community. Construction of the second story addition began in September 1985. After many long hours of planning sessions, the building committee and the community saw the fruits of their labor come to completion in 1986.[citation needed] The members of the Hampton Emergency Squad are committed to providing the latest in pre-hospital emergency medical care to the community. All members are certified Emergency Medical Technicians who continuously train and refresh their skills through drills and classroom experience. All members are able to provide defibrillation to a patient in cardiac arrest, increasing the probability of survival dramatically.[citation needed]

Public utilitiesEdit

Garbage is collected every Monday except when the date falls on a national holiday. Garbage will then be picked up on the next working day. Sanitation limit is two 30-gallon containers per household per week. Extra bag stickers can be purchased from the Municipal office.

Chip, brush, and leaves are collected on the first Thursday and Friday of each month. Leaves are collected October 24 - December 30. Branch size is not to exceed 6 inches in diameter and 10 feet in length.

Spring and Fall curbside cleanup dates vary each year and there are several restrictions on the items that may be thrown away.

EducationEdit

The Hampton School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade at Hampton Public School.[77] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 91 students and 14.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 6.5:1.[78] In the 2016–17 school year, Hampton was the 15th-smallest enrollment of any school district in the state, with 128 students.[79]

Starting in the 2018–19 school year, middle school students in grades 6 through 8 are sent to the Lebanon Township Schools on a tuition basis as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[80] As of the 2018–19 school year, Woodglen School had an enrollment of 320 students and 30.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.5:1.[81]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School in Glen Gardner, which also serves students from Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon and Tewksbury.[77][82][83] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 982 students and 83.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.8:1.[84] The school is part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, which also serves the communities of Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township, who attend North Hunterdon High School in Annandale.[85]

Eighth grade students from all of Hunterdon County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Hunterdon County Vocational School District, a county-wide vocational school district that offers career and technical education at its campuses in Raritan Township and at programs sited at local high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[86]

TransportationEdit

 
Route 31 in Hampton

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 8.80 miles (14.16 km) of roadways, of which 6.62 miles (10.65 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.05 miles (1.69 km) by Hunterdon County and 1.13 miles (1.82 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

New Jersey Route 31 is the main highway through Hampton.[88]

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hampton include:

ReferencesEdit

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  77. ^ a b 2019-2020 Public School Directory, Hunterdon County Department of Education. Accessed May 3, 2020.
  78. ^ District information for Hampton Borough School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  79. ^ Guion, Payton. "These 43 N.J. school districts have fewer than 200 students", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, September 2017. Accessed January 30, 2020. "Based on data from the state Department of Education from the last school year and the Census Bureau, NJ Advance Media made a list of the smallest of the small school districts in the state, excluding charter schools and specialty institutions.... 15. Hampton Borough; Enrollment: 128; Grades: Pre-K-8; County: Hunterdon; Town population: 1,401"
  80. ^ 2018-2019 Budget Presentation and Public Hearing Archived 2018-08-14 at the Wayback Machine, Hampton Borough School District, April 24, 2018. Accessed August 14, 2018. "Middle School students attending Lebanon Township School District on a tuition basis. Reduction in staff necessary due to send/receive relationship with Lebanon Township."
  81. ^ School data for Woodglem School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  82. ^ Voorhees High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 3, 2016. "Voorhees High School has consistently ranked among the top high schools in New Jersey and was named a National Blue Ribbon School in 2015. With an enrollment of 1,095 students in grades 9-12, the school serves the communities of Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, and Tewksbury Township."
  83. ^ Location, Hampton Elementary School. Accessed February 16, 2017. "Hampton School is a member of the Voorhees North Hunterdon Sending District. Our graduates leave us to continue their education at Voorhees High School in Glen Gardner."
  84. ^ School data for Voorhees High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  85. ^ About the District, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed October 14, 2013. "Our district consists of 12 municipalities: North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
  86. ^ Heyboer, Kelly. "How to get your kid a seat in one of N.J.'s hardest-to-get-into high schools", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, May 2017. Accessed November 18, 2019. "Hunterdon County's vo-tech district has three academies for high-achieving students, all operating in partnerships with local high schools.... The academies are open to all students in the county. Students in the 8th grade are required to submit an application, schedule an interview and take a placement exam."
  87. ^ Hunterdon County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  88. ^ Route 31 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated May 2017. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  89. ^ Staff. "Children's author Daryl Cobb returns to Hampton", Hunterdon County Democrat, March 27, 2010. Accessed July 3, 2015. "Cobb was one of five children, all boys, and spent most of his childhood in Hampton, were he dreamed of playing big league baseball and has many fond memories of his days spent in this small town."
  90. ^ Staff. "Hampton resident joins HNTB Corporation as New Jersey sales officer", Hunterdon County Democrat, December 3, 2014. Accessed September 8, 2015. "Stephen Dilts of Hampton has joined HNTB Corporation as vice president and New Jersey sales officer.... Dilts' extensive transportation industry background includes serving terms as commissioner and deputy commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Transportation, chairman of New Jersey Transit, chairman of the New Jersey Turnpike Authority, deputy executive director of the New Jersey Turnpike Authority, and mayor and council president of Hampton."
  91. ^ COL. Frank L. Howley, 6941st GdBn. Accessed August 31, 2015. "COL. Frank Howley later BG (Born, Hampton, NJ, Feb. 3, 1903; died, Warrentown, VA, July 30, 1993.)"
  92. ^ Stephen Kovas, Columbia Lions fencing. Accessed January 23, 2022. "Hometown: Hampton, N.J.; High School: North Hunterdon Reg."
  93. ^ Sidney Rivera, Major League Soccer. Accessed September 8, 2015. "Birthplace: Hampton, NJ... High School: North Hunterdon H.S. (Annandale, N.J.)"
  94. ^ Staff. "'Onion SportsDome' co-anchor played by Hampton native Matt Walton", The Express-Times, January 16, 2011. Accessed August 31, 2015. "Onion SportsDome host Alex Reiser is actually actor Matt Walton, a Voorhees High School graduate who grew up in Hunterdon County. Walton, a Hampton native, plays the co-anchor of the satirical sports program, which premiered Jan. 11 on Comedy Central."
  95. ^ Glenway Wescott Biography (1901–1987) Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, biography.com. Accessed August 1, 2007. "He returned to America and settled near Hampton, NJ."
  96. ^ Jordan, Chris. "In New Jersey, legendary keyboardist Bernie Worrell is never far from home; In New Jersey, legendary keyboardist Bernie Worrell is never far from home", Asbury Park Press, June 21, 2012. Accessed November 14, 2012. "Worrell has brought that sense of fun to millions across the globe, most notably as a member of Parliament-Funkadelic. In the upcoming weeks, his focus will be on his home state of Jersey. His annual Local and Legend festival take place Saturday, June 23, at the Unionville Vineyards in Ringoes, near his home in Hampton."

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