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Hamma Hammami (Arabic: حمّه الهمامي‎; born 8 January 1952) is a Tunisian communist, leader of the Popular Front, spokesman of the Tunisian Workers' Party,[1] and former editor of the party news organ El-Badil.

Hamma Hammami
حمّه الهمامي
Hamma Hammami, Nawaat capture 25 novembre 2014.jpg
Personal details
Born (1952-01-08) 8 January 1952 (age 67)
Tunis, Tunisia
NationalityTunisian
Political partyWorkers' Party (Tunisia)
Spouse(s)Radhia Nasraoui
Children3 (Nadia, Oussaïma and Sarah)

ActivitiesEdit

Hammami was imprisoned and tortured for his political activism against the rule of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali[2] and was noted for strong opposition to the government of Ben Ali.

On 12 January 2011, he was arrested at his home[3] for speaking to journalists about the Tunisian revolution. He was subsequently released on 15 January by the interim government of Fouad Mebazaa.

Personal lifeEdit

Hamma Hammami was born on 8 January 1952 in El Aroussa, Tunisia. He is married to the human rights lawyer Radhia Nasraoui. Together they have three daughters, Nadia, Oussaïma and Sarah.

WorksEdit

Hamma Hammami is the author of several political essays in Arabic language including:

  • Against obscurantism, Tunis, 1985
  • The perestroïka : An against-revolution, Tunis, 1988
  • History of the labor movement in Tunisia, Tunis, 1988
  • Tunisian society: social and economic study, Tunis, 1989
  • About secularism, Tunis, 1990
  • Tunisian women: present and future, Tunis, 1992
  • The path of dignity, Paris, 2002
  • Who judges whom?, Tunis, 2013
  • Liberty or Tyranny?, Tunis, 2013
  • Women and socialism today, Tunis, 2015
  • About liberties and equalities, Tunis, 2019

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pascale Harter, "Tunisia's lacklustre election," BBC (23 October 2004)
  2. ^ Hamma Hammami - Chronology of Repression, Netzwerk GewerkschafterInnen: Arbeitsgruppe für verfolgte GewerkschafterInnen, Amnesty International Austria (Updated 15 November 2002).
  3. ^ Authorities urged to release or charge Tunisian activists, Amnesty International (14 January 2011).