Open main menu
Haggerston estate residents say farewell (Fugitive Images)
Haggerston estate residents make 'i am here' (Fugitive Images)

Haggerston is a neighbourhood in central London, England[1], centred approximately on Great Cambridge Street. It is considered part of London’s East End. The adjacent neighbourhoods are Dalston (to the north), Hoxton (to the west) and Bethnal Green (to the south east). Haggerston historically formed part of Shoreditch borough, and was divided into the following ecclesiastical parishes: All Saints, St Chad, St Columba, St Mary, St Paul, St Augustin, and St Stephen.[2]

Haggerston
Haggerston2.jpg
Haggerston Pool. Closed in 2000. In the foreground is the southeast Asian refugee centre. Many Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian people have settled in Haggerston and nearby Shoreditch.
Haggerston is located in Greater London
Haggerston
Haggerston
Haggerston shown within Greater London
Population10,376 
OS grid referenceTQ335835
• Charing Cross3.6 mi (5.8 km) SW
London borough
Ceremonial countyGreater London
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townLONDON
Postcode districtE2, E8
Dialling code020
PoliceMetropolitan
FireLondon
AmbulanceLondon
EU ParliamentLondon
UK Parliament
London Assembly
List of places
UK
England
London
51°32′05″N 0°04′36″W / 51.53463°N 0.07663°W / 51.53463; -0.07663Coordinates: 51°32′05″N 0°04′36″W / 51.53463°N 0.07663°W / 51.53463; -0.07663

In 1965, the Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch became part of the new London Borough of Hackney. There is an electoral ward called Haggerston within the borough. In the 1990s a number of the area's more rundown housing estates were refurbished and some disused public buildings were privately converted into gated communities. In 2010 Haggerston Railway station re-opened, a little to the north of the original station.

Contents

OriginEdit

 
Urban decay: council blocks with boarded up windows

Haggerston is first recorded in the Domesday Book as Hergotestane, possibly of Viking origin, and an outlying hamlet of Shoreditch. On Rocque's 1745 map of Hackney, the village is shown as Agostone[3] but by the 19th century it had become Haggerstone,[4] and part of the growing urban sprawl, with factories and streets of workers' cottages lining the canal.

TodayEdit

The proximity to Hoxton and Shoreditch has made the area popular with students and workers in the creative industries, as these nearby areas have grown more expensive. In recent years, escalating property prices have driven commercial art galleries further into east London, which has exacerbated this effect. For the same reason, Haggerston has been attracting tech start ups over Silicon Roundabout in Old Street, with some people calling the area "Hackerston".[5]

A shortage of secondary school places has made the area less attractive to families but this is likely to change with the building of a City Academy on Laburnum Street.

Many Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian people have formed communities in Haggerston and nearby Shoreditch. Outside the area, the most visible sign of this is the profusion of Southeast Asian restaurants on nearby Kingsland Road in Shoreditch and on Mare Street in Hackney. There is also a notable Russian community focused on bars and cafés along Kingsland Road.

AmenitiesEdit

 
Haggerston Park. (October 2005)

Besides the Regent's Canal, Haggerston Park, on the site of a demolished gasworks on Hackney Road, provides much-needed open space in the area. Also in the area is the Hackney City Farm. The Regent Estate provides the Regent Estate Pensioners Club/Hall and the Regent Estate Community Centre/Hall which together provide community services and spaces for hire. The Regent Estate Pensioners Hall is also used as a polling station.

The Grade II listed Haggerston Pool, designed by Alfred Cross and opened in 1904, was closed in 2000. In June 2009, after a long community campaign, a £5m grant was announced from the Department for Children, Schools and Families to refurbish and reopen the pool. The building would also contain community facilities and a GP surgery.[6]

Haggerston School is a Grade II listed building, designed by the modernist architect Ernő Goldfinger and built in 1964–65.

This area of Hackney has a long association with clowning. Holy Trinity Church still hosts an annual clowns' service to commemorate Joseph Grimaldi and All Saints Centre at one time housed the Clowns Gallery and Museum, including props and a unique collection of painted eggs, serving as the 'registration' of clowns' make-up. Much of the collection is now on display at Wookey Hole.[7] Other Anglican churches in Haggerston are All Saints, Haggerston Road; St Columba, Kingsland Road; and Sts Mary and Chad, Nichols Square.[8] The Little Sisters of Jesus have had a community of sisters within Fellows Court, Haggerston, since 1990.

WardEdit

 
A map showing Haggerston ward of Shoreditch Metropolitan Borough as it appeared in 1916.

The Haggerston electoral ward forms part of the Hackney South and Shoreditch constituency.

The ward returns three councillors to Hackney Council, with an election every four years. At the election on 6 May 2010, Ann Munn, Jonathan McShane, and Barry Buitekant, all Labour Party candidates, were returned. Turnout was 54%; with 5,006 votes cast.[9]

EducationEdit

Secondary schools in the area include Haggerston School and The Bridge Academy.

TransportEdit

Railway stationsEdit

 
People of the book: Haggerston Library (foreground) and Suleymaniye Mosque (background, with minaret). Kingsland Road, September 2005
 
Gasometers at Haggerston Gasworks, view from the Regent's Canal, October 2005

Walking and cyclingEdit

The Regents Canal towpath is easily accessible to pedestrians and cyclists. It provides access to Victoria Park to the east and Islington to the west.

Public artEdit

The condemned Haggerston and Kingsland Estate was scheduled for demolition in the 1990s but the process did not get underway for another 20 years. In 2009 the artists Andrea Luka Zimmerman and Lasse Johansson, who lived on the Haggerston Estate on Dunston Road, created the I AM HERE project, placing on the building large portrait photographs of the current estate residents who were about to be moved out so the building could be demolished. These faced the Regent's Canal and were popular with passersby.[10] The project came down in April 2014.

A feature film Estate, a Reverie (83mins, Zimmerman) about the Haggerston estate was completed in 2015. Filmed over seven years, Estate, a Reverie reveals and celebrates the resilience of residents who are profoundly overlooked by media representations and wider social responses. The film was nominated for several awards, including the 2015 Grierson awards.[11][12][13][14][15]

On the Kingsland Estate in Whiston Road, Egyptian painter Nazir Tanbouli created the "King's Land" project where, in the space of four months, he covered all of the buildings of the condemned estate with murals.[16][17][18] The Kingsland Estate was demolished in late 2013.

Notable residentsEdit

  • Frank Buttle, Vicar of St Chad's Haggerston and founder of the National Adoption Society and Buttle UK
  • William Randal Cremer Liberal MP for Haggerston, pacifist and winner of the 1903 Nobel Peace Prize
  • Edmund Halley, astronomer, was born here in 1656
  • Iain Sinclair, writer
  • Nazir Tanbouli, artist
  • Andrea Luka Zimmerman, artist, transforming the Haggerston estate with the large-scale public art / photography 'i am here' project (2009–14)[19][10]
  • Lasse Johansson, artist, transforming the Haggerston estate with the large-scale public art / photography 'i am here' project (2009–14)ref>"Fugitive Images' Projects, I Am Here". Fugitiveimages.org.uk. 2010-10-25. Retrieved 2017-03-25.</ref>
  • Rachel Whiteread, sculptor

Little Sisters of JesusEdit

The Little Sisters of Jesus are a Roman Catholic community of religious sisters inspired by the life and writings of Charles de Foucauld, founded by Little Sister Magdeleine of Jesus (Madeleine Hutin). They have had a community of Sisters at their council flat on the 13th floor of Fellows Court in Weymouth Terrace, Haggerston since the early 1990s.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "London's Places" (PDF). GLA. Greater London Authority. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  2. ^ http://mapco.net/parish/parish.htm
  3. ^ "The northern suburbs: Haggerston and Hackney | British History Online". British-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  4. ^ "Stanford's Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1872". London1872.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  5. ^ "Why tech start-ups are swerving Silicon Roundabout for Haggerston". Retrieved 2015-09-02.
  6. ^ June 2009; Cash for historic baths—what the Edwardians did for us Peter Sherlock 25 June 2009 (Hackney Gazette) accessed 27 June 2009
  7. ^ Dangerfield, Andy (2013-02-04). "BBC News - Clowns in Joseph Grimaldi church tribute service". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-01-19.
  8. ^ Blagdon-Gamlen, P. E. (1973) The Church Travellers Directory. London: Church Literature Association; p. 3
  9. ^ Council Elections 2006 results for Haggerston (LB Hackney) accessed 11 May 2010
  10. ^ a b Daniel Baird (2011-07-29). "I Am Here - review". Hackney Citizen. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 4 December 2015. Retrieved 5 December 2015.
  12. ^ "Relationship remembered". openDemocracy. 2015-06-14. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  13. ^ Wilkinson, Tom (2015-06-17). "Estate: Self-portrait of a community on the edge | Thinkpiece". Architectural Review. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 5 December 2015.
  15. ^ "Estate of mind". openDemocracy. 2015-06-13. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  16. ^ "Kingsland Road Murals - Nazir Tanbouli - Distorted". Distortedarts.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  17. ^ "GLOBAL STREET ART — Nazir Tanbouli and The Kingsland Mural Project". Blog.globalstreetart.com. 2012-06-30. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  18. ^ Lizzy Buchan (2012-04-27). "Mythical creatures take over the King's Land". Hackney Citizen. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  19. ^ "People and Media Responses". I Am Here. Retrieved 2017-03-25.

Further readingEdit

  • Jones, T. E. (2003?) Father Wilson of Haggerston: a life simply offered. London: Anglo Catholic History Society (biography of Herbert Arthur Wilson of St Augustine's church, Haggerston)

External linksEdit