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HD 49674 is an 8th magnitude G-type main-sequence star (spectral type G5V) located approximately 144 light years away in the constellation of Auriga. It has a very similar mass to our Sun. It is orbited by a recently discovered planet.[3]

HD 49674
HIP 32916.jpg
HD 49674 in optical light
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Auriga
Right ascension  06h 51m 30.514s[1]
Declination +40° 52′ 03.92″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.1
Characteristics
Spectral type G5V
B−V color index 0.729
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)11.8 ± 0.3 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 32.23 ± 0.97[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −122.70 ± 0.69[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)22.61 ± 0.87[1] mas
Distance144 ± 6 ly
(44 ± 2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)8.81
Details
Mass1.07 ± 0.02[2] M
Radius1.01 ± 0.01[2] R
Luminosity0.96 ± 0.01[2] L
Surface gravity (log g)4.46 ± 0.02[2] cgs
Temperature5702 ± 28[2] K
Age1.8 ± 1.2[2] Gyr
Other designations
GSC 02946-00426, SAO 41390, uvby98 100049674, AG+40° 813, AGKR 6129, HIP 32916, SPOCS 324, BD+41° 1544, PPM 49392, TYC 2946-426-1.
Database references
SIMBADdata

Contents

Planetary systemEdit

At the time of discovery of the planet HD 49674 b in 2002, it was the least massive planet known, very close to the boundary between sub-Jupiter mass and Neptune-mass at 0.1 MJ. This planet orbits very close to the star.

The HD 49674 planetary system[4]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >0.105 ± 0.011 MJ 0.0580 ± 0.0034 4.94737 ± 0.00098 0.087 ± 0.095

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c d e f Bonfanti, A.; et al. (2015). "Revising the ages of planet-hosting stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 575. A18. arXiv:1411.4302. Bibcode:2015A&A...575A..18B. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201424951.
  3. ^ Butler, R. Paul; et al. (2003). "Seven New Keck Planets Orbiting G and K Dwarfs". The Astrophysical Journal. 582 (1): 455–466. Bibcode:2003ApJ...582..455B. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.7.6988. doi:10.1086/344570.
  4. ^ Butler, R. P.; et al. (2006). "Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets". The Astrophysical Journal. 646 (1): 505–522. arXiv:astro-ph/0607493. Bibcode:2006ApJ...646..505B. doi:10.1086/504701.

External linksEdit

Coordinates:   06h 51m 30.5164s, +40° 52′ 03.923″