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Guinness World Records: The Videogame

Guinness World Records: The Videogame is a party video game based on the Guinness World Records series of books of world records. Developed by TT Fusion and published by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, the game was released on November 7, 2008 in Europe and Australasia, and on November 11, 2008 in North America. The game involves attempting to beat real-life world records through minigames. The game saw mixed to positive reviews upon release, and was considered better than most minigame compilations that were on Nintendo consoles at the time.

Guinness World Records: The Videogame
Guinness World Records-The Video Game.jpg
North American Wii cover for Guinness World Records: The Videogame
Developer(s)TT Fusion
Publisher(s)Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment
Platform(s)
ReleaseWii, Nintendo DS
  • PAL: November 7, 2008
  • NA: November 11, 2008
iOS
  • WW: June 1, 2009
Genre(s)Party
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

GameplayEdit

Guinness World Records: The Videogame contains 36 mini-games based on real-world record attempts. The player can select 12 avatars, and can travel around a globe- like map that allows them to select minigames. Beating minigames allows the player to unlock more minigames and outfits for their avatars. Minigames involve attempting to beat a world record as fast as possible, such as building the highest skyscraper in a Tetris style minigame, attempting the world's highest BMX stunt jump, and eating a jumbo jet as fast as possible. The player's score is placed on a scoreboard at the end of the round, and is then compared over the internet to other player's scores. The game shows trivia about real-life world records on the menu and during loading screens.[1][2]

ReceptionEdit

Reception
Aggregate scores
AggregatorScore
GameRankingsDS: 70.00%[3]
Wii: 67.50%[4]
MetacriticDS: 70/100[5]
Wii: 67/100[6]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Eurogamer7/10[1]
IGN7/10[8]
VideoGamer.com8/10[7]

Guinness World Records: The Videogame received mixed reviews from critics upon release. On Metacritic, the game holds scores of 70/100 for the Nintendo DS version based on 4 reviews[5], and 67/100 for the Wii version based on 12 reviews.[6] On GameRankings, the game holds scores of 70.00% for the DS version based on 4 reviews[3], and 67.50% for the Wii version based on 16 reviews.[4]

Reviewing the DS and Wii version for IGN, Mark Thomas praised the games strange minigames, comparing it positively to Warioware, before ending the review with, "[...] But even then there are a couple of more fully-fledged gems in this pack that are addictive enough to warrant keeping the game handy long after you've been declared the best, the tallest, the strongest and the smartest with every record there is."[8] Writing for Nintendo World Report and reviewing both versions, Francesca DiMola found the games lack of similarity to actual World Records disappointing and the games boring, saying, "The lack of identity and direction is unfulfilling, and while a select group of mini-games are entertaining and original, many of them feel generic and bland.".[2] Writing for Eurogamer and reviewing the Wii version, Simon Parkin found the idea to be interesting, ending the review with "[...] Guinness World Records is the best mini-game collection we've played on the Wii, in part because of the content but principally because of its context."[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Parkin, Simon (19 December 2008). "Guinness World Records: The Videogame Review". Eurogamer. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  2. ^ a b DiMola, Franchesca. "Guinness World Records: The Videogame- review". Nintendo World Report. NINWR. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Guinness World Records: The Videogame for DS". GameRankings. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Guinness World Records: The Videogame for Wii". GameRankings. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Guinness World Records: The Videogame for DS Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  6. ^ a b "Guinness World Records: The Videogame for Wii Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  7. ^ Orry, Tom (26 November 2008). "Guinness World Records: The Videogame Review". VideoGamer.com. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  8. ^ a b Thomas, Lucas M. (20 November 2008). "IGN: Guinness World Records: The Videogame Review". IGN. Archived from the original on 16 December 2008. Retrieved 26 December 2017.

External linksEdit