Grue, Norway

Grue is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Solør. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Kirkenær. Other villages in the municipality include Bergesida, Grinder, Namnå, Risberget, Rotberget, Skasenden, and Svullrya.

Grue kommune
View of the landscape in eastern Grue
View of the landscape in eastern Grue
Flag of Grue kommune
Coat of arms of Grue kommune
Official logo of Grue kommune
Grue within Innlandet
Grue within Innlandet
Coordinates: 60°27′23″N 12°03′30″E / 60.45639°N 12.05833°E / 60.45639; 12.05833Coordinates: 60°27′23″N 12°03′30″E / 60.45639°N 12.05833°E / 60.45639; 12.05833
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictSolør
Established1 January 1838
 • Created asFormannskapsdistrikt
Administrative centreKirkenær
Government
 • Mayor (2019)Rune Grenberg[1] (Ap)
Area
 • Total837.18 km2 (323.24 sq mi)
 • Land777.54 km2 (300.21 sq mi)
 • Water59.64 km2 (23.03 sq mi)  7.1%
 • Rank#136 in Norway
Population
 (2022)
 • Total4,548
 • Rank#189 in Norway
 • Density5.8/km2 (15/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Decrease −9.1%
DemonymGrusokning[2]
Official language
 • Norwegian formBokmål
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3417
WebsiteOfficial website

The 837-square-kilometre (323 sq mi) municipality is the 136th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Grue is the 189th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 4,548. The municipality's population density is 5.8 inhabitants per square kilometre (15/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 9.1% over the previous 10-year period.[4][5]

General informationEdit

The parish of Grue was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). In 1867, the southern district of Grue (population: 3,946) was separated to become the new municipality of Brandval. This left Grue municipality with 6,464 residents. In 1941, a small area of Grue (population: 68) was transferred to the neighboring municipality of Brandval. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1969, the Rotberget farm area (population: 23) was transferred from Åsnes Municipality to Grue. On 1 January 1974, an unpopulated part of the Lystad area was transferred from Grue to the neighboring municipality of Kongsvinger.[6]

NameEdit

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Grue farm (Old Norse: Grǫf or Grǫfa), since the first Grue Church was built there. The name is identical with the word grǫf(a) which means "depression" or "hollow".[7]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 30 October 1992. The arms were designed by Harald Hallstensen. The arms are described as "left tilted dividing by silver and green, the dividing line is a curved wolf tooth pattern. The flame-like line represents the clearance of farms in the woods by the use of fire and is also a remembrance of the gruesome church fire of 1822. The colors symbolize the forests and the Glomma river.[8][9]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has two parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Grue. It is part of the Solør, Vinger og Odal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Grue
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Grue Grue Church Kirkenær 1825
Grue Finnskog Grue Finnskog Church Svullrya 1886

GeographyEdit

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Grue by country of origin in 2017[10]
Ancestry Number
  Sweden 50
  Poland 32
  Lithuania 29
  Iraq 28
  Croatia 28
  Eritrea 25
  Bosnia-Herzegovina 23

Grue is situated around the Glomma river and the geography is dominated largely by forests and some agricultural areas around Glomma. Grue is located in the southeast part of Innlandet county. It is bordered on the south by the municipality of Kongsvinger, on the north by the municipality of Åsnes, and on the west by Nord-Odal. To the east, it borders Sweden.

Grue was the early center for the Finnish migration which today populates the Finnskogen, a belt about 32 kilometres (20 mi) wide and running continuously along the frontier in the districts of Brandval, Grue, Hof, Åsnes, and Våler. Their first population center in Norway was located around the lake of Røgden.

The rivers Løvhaugsåa and Rotna both run through the area. The lakes Hukusjøen, Skasen, Gardsjøen.

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Grue, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[11] The municipality falls under the Romerike og Glåmdal District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Grue is made up of 19 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Grue kommunestyre 2020–2023 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Grue local list (Grue Bygdeliste)1
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 2016–2019 [13][14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre),
Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti),
and Liberal Party (Venstre)
8
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 2012–2015 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre),
Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti),
and Liberal Party (Venstre)
7
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 2008–2011 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre),
Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti),
Centre Party (Senterpartiet), and Liberal Party (Venstre)
7
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 2004–2007 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre),
Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti),
Centre Party (Senterpartiet), and Liberal Party (Venstre)
9
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 2000–2003 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Joint list of the Conservative Party (Høyre),
Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti),
Centre Party (Senterpartiet), and Liberal Party (Venstre)
10
Total number of members:19
Grue kommunestyre 1996–1999 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1992–1995 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1988–1991 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1984–1987 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1980–1983 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1976–1979 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1972–1975 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1968–1971 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)2
Total number of members:25
Grue kommunestyre 1964–1967 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:25
Grue herredsstyre 1960–1963 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
Total number of members:25
Grue herredsstyre 1956–1959 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
Total number of members:25
Grue herredsstyre 1952–1955 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
Total number of members:24
Grue herredsstyre 1948–1951 [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
Total number of members:24
Grue herredsstyre 1945–1947 [29]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)4
Total number of members:24
Grue herredsstyre 1938–1941* [30]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:24
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Grue since 1838 when the municipality was established:[31]

  • 1838-1845: Ole Arntzen Lutzow
  • 1846-1847: Jørgen Cappelen Omsted
  • 1848-1857: Nicolai Astrup
  • 1858-1859: Gunder Gundersen
  • 1860-1863: Jacob Rolsdorph Andersen
  • 1864-1879: Ole Bredesen Opset
  • 1880-1883: Arne A. Omsted
  • 1883-1887: Ole Bredesen Opset
  • 1888-1898: Arne A. Omsted
  • 1899-1907: Amund Bredesen Opset
  • 1908-1913: Wilhelm Omsted
  • 1914-1919: Amund Bredesen Opset
  • 1920-1925: Magnus Vangerud
  • 1926-1928: Sigurd Woll
  • 1929-1931: Ole H. Sæther
  • 1932-1933: Arve Myrvang
  • 1933-1934: Arne Tveter
  • 1935-1935: Ole Kamphaug
  • 1936-1940: Eivind Grimstad
  • 1940-1945: Vacant due to WWII
  • 1945-1945: Martin Møllerud
  • 1946-1955: Magnus Vangerud
  • 1956-1963: Reidar Mellem
  • 1964-1964: Martin Råberget
  • 1964-1978: Thor Henriksen
  • 1979-1985: Torbjøn Øveråsen
  • 1985-1999: Ragnar Nyman
  • 1999-2007: Niels Ferdinand Rolsdorph
  • 2007-2011: Herdis Bragelien
  • 2011-2015: Niels Ferdinand Rolsdorph
  • 2015-2019: Wenche Huser Sund
  • 2019–present: Rune Grenberg

Notable peopleEdit

 
Åsta Holth, 1945

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "(+) Tungt kjede for ny ordfører, men stolen er god å sitte i". www.ostlendingen.no (in Norwegian). 8 October 2019. Archived from the original on 10 October 2019. Retrieved 10 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  3. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  6. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 September 2012. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  7. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 248. Archived from the original on 27 May 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  8. ^ "Om Grues kommunevåpen" (in Norwegian). Grue Kommune. Archived from the original on 22 March 2009. Retrieved 21 December 2008.
  9. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Archived from the original on 25 February 2021. Retrieved 17 March 2022.
  10. ^ "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by immigration category, country background and percentages of the population". ssb.no. Archived from the original on 2 July 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  11. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  12. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Archived from the original on 27 May 2022. Retrieved 17 March 2022.
  13. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet. Archived from the original on 27 May 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  14. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Archived from the original on 19 April 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  15. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Archived (PDF) from the original on 20 September 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Archived (PDF) from the original on 22 May 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  18. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  19. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  20. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 September 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 April 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 April 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 April 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Archived (PDF) from the original on 17 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  29. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 August 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  30. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  31. ^ "Ordførere i Grue kommune fra 1838" (in Norwegian). Grue kommune. 29 April 2019. Archived from the original on 29 December 2021. Retrieved 17 March 2022.

External linksEdit