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Grenoble Foot 38, commonly referred to as simply GF38, is a French association football club based in Grenoble, a city situated at the foot of the French Alps. The original incarnation of the club was founded in 1892 and, in 1997, was formed into the club that exists today as a result of a merger. Grenoble currently plays in Championnat National, the third level of French football, after having gone into bankruptcy and relegation to the fifth level of French football in 2011.

GF38
Grenoble Foot 38 logo.svg
Full name Grenoble Foot 38
Nickname(s) GF38
Founded 1892; 125 years ago (1892)
Ground Stade des Alpes,
Grenoble
Ground Capacity 20,068
Manager Olivier Guégan
League Championnat National
2016–17 Championnat de France Amateur Group C, 1st (promoted)
Website Club website

Grenoble plays its home matches at the Stade des Alpes, a 21st century complex based in the heart of the city. Grenoble wear white and blue.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The club was founded in 1892 as Football Club de Grenoble. In 1997, a merger of Olympique Grenoble Isère and Norcap Olympique led to the Grenoble Foot 38 incarnation. Olympique Grenoble Isère played in Ligue 1 in the 1960–61 and 1962–63 seasons.

It was acquired in 2004 by the Japanese enterprise Index which soon was able to use a new stadium, Stade des Alpes, that registered an initial capacity of 20,000, and which was opened on February 2008, after which it achieved promotion to Ligue 1 in the 2008–09 season.[1] However, after losing their first eleven games of the season, Grenoble were eventually relegated despite a handful of impressive wins (most notably 4–0 against Paris Saint Germain).

The professional football club was liquidated in 2011 with debts of €2.9m, and relegated administratively to Championnat de France Amateur 2.[2][3]

Now an amateur side, Grenoble won promotion from Championnat de France Amateur 2 at the first attempt in 2012, and were champions of 2016–17 Championnat de France Amateur, returning to Championnat National for the 2017–18 season


Name changesEdit

  • Football Club de Grenoble 1892 (1892–1977)
  • Football Club Association Sportive de Grenoble (1977–1984)
  • Football Club de Grenoble Dauphiné (1984–1990)
  • Football Club de Grenoble Isère (1990–1992)
  • Football Club de Grenoble Jojo Isère (1992–1993)
  • Olympique Grenoble Isère (1993–1997)
  • Grenoble Foot 38 (1997–present)

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

As of 8 November 2017.[4] [1]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1   GK Brice Maubleu
3   DF Bassiri Keita
4   DF Éric Vandenabeele
5   DF Selim Bengriba
6   MF Steven Pinto-Borges
7   FW Florian Sotoca
8   MF Corentin Tirard
9   FW Nicolas Belvito
10   MF Raphaël Gherardi
11   FW Florian David
13   DF Harouna Sy
14   MF Francis Dady Ngoye
15   MF Alexi Peuget
No. Position Player
16   GK Papa Demba Camara
17   DF Maxime Spano
18   DF Ugo Guégan
19   FW Edwin Maanane
20   DF Fernand Mayembo
21   MF Jessy Bénet (on loan from Dijon)
22   MF Arsène Elogo
24   MF Ibréhima Coulibaly
25   DF Nathanaël Dieng
28   MF Julien Delétraz
30   GK Nathan Monti
33   FW Malek Chergui

Notable playersEdit

Below are the notable former players who have represented Grenoble and its predecessors in league and international competition since the club's foundation in 1997. To appear in the section below, a player must have played in at least 80 official matches for the club.

For a complete list of Grenoble Foot 38 players, see Category:Grenoble Foot 38 players

ManagersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Grenoble Foot 38 celebrates the long awaited opening of its new professional soccer stadium, "Stade des Alpes"". Index Holdings. Archived from the original on 22 January 2009. Retrieved 17 May 2008. 
  2. ^ "Le club de football de Grenoble en liquidation judiciaire" (in French). Le Monde. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 8 November 2017. 
  3. ^ "Grenoble: Le GF38 relégué en CFA2" (in French). Canal+. 27 July 2011. Retrieved 8 November 2017. 
  4. ^ "Groupe National 1 2017-2018". gf38.fr. Retrieved 10 September 2017. 

External linksEdit