Open main menu

Greg Moore (racing driver)

Gregory William Moore (April 22, 1975 – October 31, 1999) was a Canadian race car driver who competed in the Indy Lights and Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) from 1993 to 1999. He began competitive karting at the age of ten and achieved early success, before progressing to open-wheel car racing in the Canadian Formula Ford Championship in 1991. Moore won the 1992 USAC FF2000 Western Division Championship and the 1995 Indy Lights Championship.

Greg Moore
Greg Moore CART Race car driver.jpg
NationalityCanadian
Born(1975-04-22)April 22, 1975
New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
DiedOctober 31, 1999(1999-10-31) (aged 24)
Fontana, California, United States
Cause of deathRacing accident
Height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)[1]
Weight160 lb (73 kg)[1]
Achievements1995 Indy Lights champion
Champ Car career
72 races run over 4 years
Years active1996–1999
Team(s)Forsythe Racing
Best finish5th (1998)
First race1996 Marlboro Grand Prix of Miami (Homestead)
Last race1999 Marlboro 500 (California)
First win1997 Milwaukee Miller Lite 200 (Milwaukee)
Last win1999 Marlboro Grand Prix of Miami (Homestead)
Wins Podiums Poles
5 17 5

He began competing in CART with Forsythe Racing in 1996, finishing ninth in the drivers' championship and was second to Alex Zanardi in the Rookie of the Year standings. The following year, Moore claimed the first two victories of his career to finish seventh in the points' standings. He improved on his performance to place fifth overall with a further two wins in 1998. In 1999, he took another win as his form lowered and fell to tenth. At the season-ending Marlboro 500 at California Speedway, Moore was killed in a violent airborne collision with a concrete barrier on the race's tenth lap. He was the second driver to be killed in CART competition in 1999 after Gonzalo Rodríguez three races earlier at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. It was scheduled to be his final race for Forsythe Racing before moving to Team Penske in 2000.

Overall Moore competed in 72 CART races, winning five and achieving 17 podium finishes. He was a popular figure known as an oval track specialist. Moore's car number 99 was retired from the list of those available to drivers competing in CART and its support series as a mark of respect. Since his death, the Greg Moore Foundation was established in his honour to continue his legacy through charitable causes. Three establishments in British Columbia have been named after the driver. Moore was posthumously inducted into the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame and BC Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.

Early lifeEdit

Gregory William Moore was born in New Westminster in the Canadian province of British Columbia on April 22, 1975.[2] His father, Ric, owned a Chrysler dealership in Maple Ridge, a city close to Vancouver,[2] and raced Can-Am cars at the club level.[3] He divorced his wife Donna when Moore was five years old and the boy lived with his mother until the start of his karting career.[2] He had two siblings: a brother and a sister.[4] Moore was first educated at Meadowridge School. He was transferred to Pitt Meadows Secondary School for the final two years of his education,[5] where he graduated with honors in 1993.[2][3]

He often climbed into his father's race car and pretended to race by gripping the steering wheel.[2] That encouraged his interest in auto racing,[2] and his father gave him a go-kart at the age of six.[6] Moore drove the go-kart with a minivan's plastic bodywork around it in the parking lot of his father's dealership. He developed vehicular control on dry slick tyres on a wet track.[7] He began competitive go-kart racing at the age of ten,[8] and joined the Westwood Karting Club soon after.[7] It was there Moore was issued with his car number 99 because he was the club's 99th member; he used it throughout his career.[a][10] His father acted as his manager, tutor and financier and adopted a "no-nonsense" approach to his career.[7]

While he had an inclination towards racing, he also played ice hockey.[2] From the age of ten, Moore was a goalie and drove go-karts. He was twice named Maple Ridge Athlete of the Year and he won the British Columbia Hockey Provincial Championship.[11] Moore played on the same minor ice hockey team as future professional player Paul Kariya.[12] When he was 14, his father urged him to choose between ice hockey and racing if he wanted to further develop in sports. Moore ultimately decided to focus on racing.[11] His sporting idols were ice hockey player Wayne Gretzky and three-time Formula One World Champion Ayrton Senna.[2]

Junior careerEdit

In 1989 and 1990, Moore won the North American Enduro Kart Racing Championship. His father wanted to know whether his son's achievements were down to his driving abilities or the equipment.[2] He took Moore to the Spenard-David Racing School in Shannonville, Ontario, in August 1990,[2] where racer David Empringham instructed him.[13] He won a race over 40 drivers.[14] Track owner Richard Spenard was impressed by Moore's ability and invited him to return later that year to partake in a "Top Gun" series. He won against almost 800 fellow drivers at the conclusion of the school's three-day run-offs.[15] Moore learnt how to select a lower gear, where to locate the apex of a corner, and how to avoid an accident.[3]

He made the decision to progress to car racing in 1991,[15] and was assigned Steve Challis as his race engineer and adviser.[16] Moore competed in the eight-round Canadian Formula Ford Championship in a Van Diemen RF91-Ford.[17] He won the Shannonville Motorsport Park round, and took a further four top-ten results to finish fourth in the final points' standings with 120 accrued.[17] He was named the series' Rookie of the Year.[15] Moore moved to the higher-tier USAC FF2000 Western Division Championship in 1992. He took four pole positions and four victories en route to claiming the series' title.[15] Moore was voted Rookie of the Year at this tier after advancing at the start of the season,[15] and was inducted into the series' Hall of Fame in 1999 as a 1992 graduate.[18]

During the off-season, he was employed in the service department of a dealership in Duncan, British Columbia.[19] For 1993, his family believed a progression to Formula Atlantic would help his career develop.[14] However, the series' sanctioning body, the Sports Car Club of America, refused to grant Moore a racing licence because he was under the age of 18 at the time.[15] Moore's father talked to the president and CEO of Indy Lights Roger Bailey in Vancouver. He agreed to grant Moore a provisional racing licence for the 1993 season's first two rounds at Phoenix International Raceway (now ISM Raceway) and Long Beach. Because he was 17, he was obliged to remain in pit road until his car was towed into the paddock, and was then allowed to vacate.[14] Around this time, Moore asked permission from Brian Stewart, owner of Brian Stewart Racing, to retain race number 99 after it was assigned to Stewart's team for the 1992 season.[20] He sought to win Rookie of the Year and finish in the top five in points.[21] In twelve races, Moore took seven top-ten finishes, with a best result of third at Portland International Raceway, and placed ninth in the points' standings with 64 points.[22]

Before the 1994 season, the team had a small budget of US$380,000. The family's house and dealership was mortgaged to allow Moore to continue competing. Their financial situation forced him to drive conservatively to preserve tires three times longer than other drivers, and not strain mechanical parts, since his family lacked the capital to purchase additional equipment.[14] Nevertheless, in the season's opening round at Phoenix, Moore surpassed Paul Tracy's record as the youngest Indy Lights pole position starter at age 18,[23] and became the youngest driver in history to win a Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART)-sanctioned event.[2] He won two more races (at New Hampshire Motor Speedway and Nazareth Speedway) to finish the championship with 154 points and take third in the drivers' standings.[24] In November 1994, Moore undertook a two-day test session with Penske Racing's CART team on a test-specific road course at Nazareth Speedway.[25]

His reputation and recognition of his ability (and lobbying by his father) attracted the attention of Forsythe Racing owner Gerald Forsythe, who sought a Canadian driver to compete for his Indy Lights team in 1995.[20][26] Forsythe was willing to relieve Moore's financial burdens by incorporating them into the team,[26] and signing Moore to a five-year contract.[27] Three of Moore's mechanics transferred from his family's team to Forsythe Racing. While his father remained his manager, he did not join the organization as an employee.[28][29] Driving a Lola T93/20-Buick 3800 V6, he dominated the championship, winning ten of twelve races.[2] He eclipsed the record for consecutive wins at the season's start with the first five races and the most victories in an Indy Lights season, both held by Paul Tracy from the 1990 championship (nine out of fourteen).[30] Moore led a total of 375 out of 583 laps and completed all twelve races,[31] covering 847 miles (1,363 km) en route to winning the drivers' championship with 242 points.[2]

Championship Auto Racing TeamsEdit

1996: Debut seasonEdit

 
Moore driving for Forsythe Racing in practice for the 1996 Miller 200 at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course.

After testing for Forsythe Racing at Phoenix International Raceway in September 1995,[32] the team's primary sponsor, Player's, confirmed on October 19 Moore would replace the outgoing Jacques Villeneuve for the 1996 season.[33] He spent 30 days testing for the team in the United States, and underwent a conditioning program to prepare himself physically with the 750 hp (560 kW) turbocharged No. 99 Reynard 96i Mercedes-Benz IC108 V8t for the 200-mile (320 km) to 500-mile (800 km) races.[34] Fellow drivers did not give him much advice so Moore observed them.[35] He debuted at the season-opening Grand Prix of Miami at the Homestead–Miami Speedway. Starting in sixth he finished in seventh, after incurring a stop-and-go penalty for an illegal overtake on Juan Manuel Fangio II under yellow flag conditions, and unlapped himself from the race winner, Jimmy Vasser.[10][26] Two races later, Moore had the first podium of his career (third place) at Surfers Paradise Street Circuit.[36] He bettered that result with a second-place finish at Nazareth Speedway two rounds after that.[37] Although Forsythe Racing had sub-par equipment,[38] he regularly challenged for victories and claimed three podium finishes.[26] Moore finished his rookie season ninth in the drivers' standings with 84 points,[39] and was second to Alex Zanardi in the Rookie of the Year standings.[26]

1997: First two victoriesEdit

For the 1997 CART World Series, Moore drove a 1996-specification chassis from Reynard after trials of a Lola monocoque in pre-season testing at Homestead–Miami Speedway reduced Forsythe Racing's performance.[40] He began the season stronger than the previous year, earning three top-four finishes—including second-place results at Surfers Paradise and the Autódromo Internacional Nelson Piquet—in the opening six races.[41] At the season's seventh race, the Miller Genuine Draft 200 at the Milwaukee Mile, Moore ran the final 96 laps without making a pit stop. He held off Michael Andretti to take his first career victory becoming—at the age of 22 years, 1 month and 29 days—the youngest driver to win a CART race.[b][43] He then won the ITT Automotive Detroit Grand Prix at The Raceway on Belle Isle one week later after PacWest Racing teammates Maurício Gugelmin and Mark Blundell ran out of fuel on the final lap.[44] Thereafter Moore finished in the top-five twice more (at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course and Portland International Raceway) as his campaign faltered through mechanical attrition and accidents. He was seventh in the final drivers' championship standings with 111 points.[41][45]

1998: Fifth place in pointsEdit

The beginning of the 1998 championship saw Moore start from the pole position for the first time in his career at the season-opening Grand Prix of Miami. He became—at the age of 22 years, 10 months and 18 days—the youngest pole position starter in CART history.[8] He finished the race in second position after an air jack fault during a pit stop dropped him down the order and he moved through the running order.[46] Nevertheless, Moore continued driving well, taking another three top-ten finishes in the next three races becoming the drivers' championship leader.[47] At the Rio 400, he took his third career victory to extend his points' lead by passing Alex Zanardi with five laps to go.[12] Moore took two more pole positions at Gateway International Raceway and The Raceway on Belle Isle,[47] and his second win of 1998 at the U.S. 500 at Michigan International Speedway and the Vanderbilt Cup after a duel between the Chip Ganassi Racing duo of Zanardi and Jimmy Vasser in its final four laps.[48] The rest of his season included five consecutive retirements,[47] and the fourth pole position of his career at the Grand Prix of Houston,[49] despite his Mercedes-Benz engine lacking traction on road courses.[26] At the season-ending Marlboro 500 at California Speedway (now Auto Club Speedway), Moore finished second after Vasser passed him on the last lap.[50] He placed fifth in the drivers' standings with 141 points,[47] and his performance throughout the season established him as one of CART's top drivers.[51]

1999: Final seasonEdit

Entering the 1999 season, CART's fanbase and the media considered Moore a favorite for the points' title.[52][53] He spent much of the pre-season testing on road and street courses, telling the New York Daily News that his objective for the season was to win as many races as possible and claim the drivers' championship.[54] He began in the pole position at the season-opening round, the Grand Prix of Miami, and led for 96 laps in the fifth win of his career.[55] Moore said afterward he learned from Alex Zanardi to accept finishing a race without a victory as part of maturing as a driver.[56] He finished in the top ten four more times over the next six races, losing the lead in the points standings after a 12th-place finish at the season's fourth round, the Bosch Spark Plug Grand Prix at Nazareth Speedway.[57] Moore's qualifying performance diminished thereafter, as he fell further in the drivers' championship. He took three additional finishes within the top four in the season's final eleven races,[57] as he drove an under-powered, unreliable car fitted with a Mercedes-Benz engine.[58] He concluded the season tenth with 97 points in the drivers' championship.[57]

Contract negotiations for the 2000 seasonEdit

With his five-year contract with Forsythe Racing ending after the 1999 season, Moore began negotiations with several CART teams and other auto racing series.[59] He admitted to having an interest in NASCAR, and established friendships with drivers such as Jeff Burton, and discussed competing in stock car racing with Bobby Labonte.[60] Moore told USA Today: "I think your career can be longer over there. You can be older and still be competitive because of the way the cars are. It's not as physically demanding. It's more a thinking-man's kind of thing."[61] He discussed driving for Cal Wells' PPI Motorsports team,[62] and with Andy Petree Racing.[63] Moore entered into discussions with Forsythe Racing on June 30.[63] Team owner Gerald Forsythe made him an offer that was rejected because of monetary limitations.[64] On August 6 it was announced Moore had signed a three-year contract worth $10 million to replace Al Unser Jr. at Penske's CART squad from 2000 onward.[c][4][66] According to CART driver Tony Kanaan, Moore planned to spend three to four more years in CART, before entering NASCAR.[10]

Other racing venturesEdit

Frank Williams, the founder and principal of the Williams Formula One team, asked about Moore's services as a test driver, but was told he was under contract to Forsythe Racing.[14] Moore was asked by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to fill in for commentator Jackie Stewart for its broadcast of the 1997 Canadian Grand Prix. Formula One officials forbade it because he was a CART driver.[67]

In late 1997, he drove for AMG-Mercedes in the FIA GT Championship at the season's final two rounds, the Sebring 3 Hours and the Laguna Seca 3 Hours, sharing the No. 12 Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR with Alexander Wurz in the GT1 category. Their car finished in seventh place in both races.[68] Moore was one of twelve drivers invited to compete in the four-race International Race of Champions (IROC) stock car racing series in 1999.[69] Driving a Pontiac Firebird, he finished 12th (and last) in the points' standings with three top-ten finishes and earned 25 points.[70]

DeathEdit

The Marlboro 500 at California Speedway on October 31 was the final event of the 1999 season. This was scheduled to be Moore's last race with Forsythe Racing before moving to Penske in 2000.[71] On the morning of the day before the race,[72] he was knocked off his motor scooter by a paddock vehicle in the hospitality area because its driver was blinded by the rising sun.[73][74] Moore suffered a deep laceration to his right hand that required fifteen stitches, bruising to his right hip,[26][71] and a fractured index finger on his right hand.[75] Uncertain whether Moore would participate, Forsythe Racing employed Roberto Moreno as an emergency reserve driver in the event doctors deemed Moore unfit to race.[76] After a six-lap on-track test session, which he was judged to have run at a sufficient pace later that day, and two medical consultations with Steve Olvey, CART's director of medical affairs,[71] he was permitted to drive in a protective hand brace and use a modified steering wheel.[77] Officials required him to start at the back of the grid because he missed qualifying.[72]

 
Moore's memorial headstone at Robinson Memorial Park Cemetery

Following an early race rolling restart, on lap 10, Moore was 15th when he lost control of his car exiting turn two,[78] possibly due to losing the slipstream of a car ahead of him.[79] He attempted to regain control but left skid marks on the track[80] as he spun almost 500 ft (150 m) down the circuit,[81] and into the infield grass at more than 220 mph (350 km/h).[73] Moore hit an access road lower than the grass, went airborne, barrel rolled and slammed into a concrete barrier lacking a tire wall to absorb the impact at unabated speed at a 90-degree angle.[26][82][83] The impact, registered at 154 g0 (1,510 m/s2) by the vehicle's black box,[82] split the car in two, scattered a large amount of debris as the open-cockpit compartment seating the driver disintegrated.[71][84] Moore's helmet struck the ground several times before the car rested upside down after spinning four times.[78][84] He was extricated from it and administered cardiopulmonary resuscitation by circuit medics before being transported by helicopter to Loma Linda University Medical Center. Moore was pronounced dead at 13:21 Pacific Standard Time (UTC−08:00) with severe head and internal injuries.[85] He was the second driver to die from injuries sustained in a crash during a CART race that season: Penske's Gonzalo Rodríguez died in a practice accident at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca three races earlier.[72]

At the pronouncement of Moore's death, chief steward Wally Dallenbach Sr. ordered all track flags to be lowered to half staff and no post-race celebrations occurred.[73] The other drivers were not informed of the situation until the event's conclusion.[10] At the request of Moore's father, the CART end-of-season awards banquet at The Century Plaza Hotel continued as scheduled the following night;[78] its format was changed to include a 15-minute tribute to Moore and Rodríguez.[86] Makeshift memorials were built at Pitt Meadows Secondary School and his father's car dealership.[87] The Canadian Motor Sports Hall of Fame had a book of condolence for fans to sign for later delivery to the Moore family.[88] He was cremated on November 2. A private memorial service was held at St. Andrews Wesley United Church in downtown Vancouver, attended by 1,200 family members and close friends on the following day.[89] On November 4, a second public memorial service took place at Maple Ridge Baptist Church in Moore's home town of Maple Ridge attended by 1,500 mourners.[90]

On December 20, CART stated its investigation of Moore's crash found there was no single cause for it. Engineers employed by the series obtained and analysed a large amount of data from equipment installed in Moore's car, discovering he began losing vehicular control halfway in turn two but not why it went airborne on the asphalt access road.[81] Tim Mayer, CART's vice-president of racing operations, commented, "I think the answers we know show that there isn’t a clear-cut answer, but he was reacting to a situation that started in the middle of Turn Two, and there’s nothing there that seems unusual. We’re confident that there was no mechanical failure. The cause of the accident is something of a mystery. I mean that the initial factor that set the chain of events in motion is unknown."[81]

Driving style and racing overallsEdit

Moore was described as having "Gilles Villeneuve-esque car control" that accompanied "his fearless style, and his incredible determination."[91] In his CART career, he was known as an oval track specialist,[10][16][26] locating the optimum amount of grip as he drove near to oversteering.[26] Moore refined this ability after having difficulty on oval tracks in his first two years in Indy Lights. He drove the car correctly always wanting to retain control of the rear end of his car. He learned to drive a "loose" car after his father entered him in some ice races on the advice of race engineer Steve Challis.[16] During practice for the oval track races, he focused on the set-up of his vehicle believing he could pass other drivers; he did so by steering to the right of a track.[26]

Moore's Indy Lights helmet design featured a mixture of lightning bolts and a checkered flag. Upon moving to CART, Forsythe Racing's primary sponsor asked for a more subtle and corporate helmet design.[92] Regardless of the blue colour of his team's primary sponsor Player's, Moore wore a pair of red racing gloves to emphasise the pride in his Canadian nationality.[93]

Personality and legacyEdit

Iain MacIntyre of the Vancouver Sun described Moore as "tall and fair-haired with wire-rimmed glasses" and someone who "possessed a wholesome, innocent bearing and boyish enthusiasm that was infectious."[94] Race car driver Mario Andretti described him as articulate, a meaningful speaker, and considered him "very professional and mature for his age".[95] Moore was cordial with the media,[96] and was regarded with affection by CART fans and fellow drivers because of his occasional "wacky and over-the-top sense of humour",[97] particularly with children.[96] He had a serious temperament while driving,[97] was positive career-wise,[98] played practical jokes on others outside of his profession,[97] and was devoted to his family and fans.[7] Moore admitted to driver errors he had made,[98] established friendships with several drivers and organized social gatherings.[95] From August 1998 until his death, he led a four-man international group of drivers called "The Brat Pack" with Max Papis, Dario Franchitti, and Tony Kannan.[d] The quartet had an energetic longing for enjoyment, going to all-night parties, discussing life, and for maintaining close contact with one another.[99][100]

His talent on track was special, he was bloody good at thinking through a race. The record books only tell half the story, in the way of someone like Gilles Villeneuve. You look at that and go, 'He won how many races?' but he's considered one of the most talented drivers of all time. I think Greg goes down in that same category.

Dario Franchitti on Moore's legacy as a driver.[101]

As a mark of respect, CART, Indy Lights and Formula Atlantic retired Moore's car number 99 from the list of those available to drivers in all three series.[102] On September 1, 2000, CART established the Greg Moore Legacy Award to honor "the driver who best typifies Moore's legacy of outstanding talent on track as well as displaying a dynamic personality with fans, media and within the CART community."[102] A maximum of four or five drivers were nominated by a panel of experts with at least one competitor representing CART, Indy Lights and Formula Atlantic.[102] Hélio Castroneves was its first recipient in 2000. Others to receive the award include Dario Franchitti in 2001, Sébastien Bourdais in 2003, Ryan Hunter-Reay in 2004, and J. R. Hildebrand when it was limited to Indy Lights drivers in 2009.[76] The 2010 award was presented to James Hinchcliffe,[103] a driver who idolizes Moore and competed with a pair of Moore's red racing gloves during qualifying for the 2012 Indianapolis 500.[104] Others to list Moore as a role model include Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy competitor Stefan Rzadzinski and sports car driver Scott Hargrove.[98]

The Greg Moore Foundation was established by his father to continue his son's legacy through charitable work.[105] It supports scholarships for young people to continue their education after graduating from secondary school, provides funding to five health charities and local hospitals, aids in the development of amateur athletes and works against drunk driving.[105][106] Moore was posthumously awarded the Jack Diamond Award, which honors "an individual who consistently demonstrated a competitive and co-operative spirit, who excelled in sport and who made a positive contribution to the community".[52] It was collected by his family at a dinner ceremony in Vancouver's Jewish Community Centre on February 15, 2000.[52] He was posthumously inducted into the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame and the BC Sports Hall of Fame that year.[107][108] In 2007, Moore's stepmother opened a glass case gallery containing his racing artifacts in the BC Sports Hall of Fame.[109] A go-kart track in Chilliwack,[110] a youth centre in Maple Ridge established in October 2001,[111] and the Emergency Department at the Ridge Meadows Hospital inaugurated by British Columbia Premier Gordon Campbell and the Minister of Health George Abbott eight years later are all named after Moore.[112]

Moore was honored by the organizers of the Molson Indy Vancouver with the words "Courage, Greg Moore No. 99" written in large white block letters across the start/finish line of the Concord Pacific Place temporary street circuit in 2000.[106] Starting from that year's race until its discontinuation in 2004, the pole position starter received the Greg Moore Pole Award.[105] A book entitled Greg Moore: A Legacy of Spirit written by journalists Dan Proudfoot, Jim Taylor and Gordon Kirby was published by Whitecap Books on August 30, 2000.[113] The following year, a documentary to compliment the book called Greg Moore - A Racer's Story, was narrated and hosted by actress Ashley Judd. It was shown twice on The Sports Network in 2001 and had a subsequent release on VHS.[114] Dario Franchitti dedicated his 2002 Molson Indy Vancouver win to Moore,[115] and again after his 2009 IndyCar Series championship victory.[116] A second documentary, A Hero's Drive: The Greg Moore Tribute, was shown on Sportsnet in May 2013.[93] Two months later, Autosport magazine named Moore one of the 50 greatest drivers to have never raced in Formula One.[117]

Racing recordEdit

American open-wheel racing resultsEdit

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Indy LightsEdit

Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Rank Points Ref
1993 Greg Moore Racing PHX
5
LBH
17
MIL
5
DET
8
POR
3
CLE
10
TOR
8
NHA
16
VAN
18
MDO
4
NAZ
8
LS
19
9th 64 [22]
1994 Greg Moore Racing PHX
1
LBH
2
MIL
3
DET
7
POR
5
CLE
2
TOR
12
MDO
7
NHA
1
VAN
5
NAZ
1
LS
5
3rd 154 [24]
1995 Player's/Forsythe Racing MIA
1
PHX
1
LBH
1
NAZ
1
MIL
1
DET
2
POR
1
TOR
1
CLE
1
NHA
1
VAN
5
LS
1
1st 242 [31]

CARTEdit

Year Team Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Rank Points Ref
1996 Player's/Forsythe Racing Reynard 96i Mercedes-Benz IC108C V8t MIA
7
RIO
Ret
SRF
3
LBH
Ret
NAZ
2
US
Ret
MIL
5
DET
20
POR
Ret
CLE
3
TOR
4
MIC
17
MDO
Ret
ROA
Ret
VAN
Ret
LAG
6
9th 84 [39]
1997 Player's/Forsythe Racing Reynard 97i Mercedes-Benz IC108D V8t MIA
4
SRF
2
LBH
Ret
NAZ
16
RIO
2
GAT
13
MIL
1
DET
1
POR
5
CLE
Ret
TOR
Ret
MIC
Ret
MDO
2
ROA
Ret
VAN
Ret
LAG
Ret
FON
Ret
7th 111 [41]
1998 Player's/Forsythe Racing Reynard 98i Mercedes-Benz IC108E V8t MIA
2
MOT
4
LBH
6
NAZ
3
RIO
1
GAT
3
MIL
13
DET
5
POR
Ret
CLE
Ret
TOR
11
MIC
1
MDO
Ret
ROA
Ret
VAN
Ret
LAG
Ret
HOU
Ret
SRF
8
FON
2
5th 141 [47]
1999 Player's/Forsythe Racing Reynard 99i Mercedes-Benz IC108E V8t MIA
1
MOT
4
LBH
8
NAZ
12
RIO
8
GAT
6
MIL
2
POR
13
CLE
Ret
ROA
4
TOR
Ret
MIC
Ret
DET
3
MDO
11
CHI
Ret
VAN
Ret
LAG
Ret
HOU
16
SRF
Ret
FON
Ret
10th 97 [57]

International Race of ChampionsEdit

(key) (Bold – Pole position. * – Most laps led.)

International Race of Champions results
Year Make 1 2 3 4 Pos. Points Ref
1999 Pontiac DAY
5
TAL
7
MCH
9
IND
12
12th 25 [70]

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ It is a common misconception that Moore chose number 99 because it was the number worn by hockey player Wayne Gretzky, one of his idols.[9]
  2. ^ The record for the youngest winner of a CART-sanctioned event was broken by Scott Dixon in 2001 and later surpassed by Nelson Philippe in its successor organisation Champ Car World Series five years later.[42]
  3. ^ After Moore's death, the contract became controversial after Penske scratched Moore's name and his representatives with those of Hélio Castroneves, so that the team was set by the sponsor-imposed deadline of November. This caused Castroneves to be charged (and eventually acquitted) with tax evasion in 2008.[65]
  4. ^ "The Brat Pack" was a name derived from the Frank Sinatra-led Rat Pack group of entertainers who enlivened the Hollywood party scene in the 1950s and 1960s.[99][100]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Greg Moore: IROC 1999 Driver Spec Sheet". International Race of Champions. 1999. Archived from the original on October 3, 1999. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Greg Moore". Gale Biography in Context. 2000. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Biography in Context.
  3. ^ a b c "Indy Car Racing Media Conference: Greg Moore". ASAP Sports. March 14, 1995. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "No one forgets about Greg Moore". Ottawa Citizen. October 30, 2009. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via PressReader.
  5. ^ Moore, Al (November 1, 1999). "A quiet, unassuming hero". Vancouver Sun. p. A2C. Retrieved May 25, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ MacQueen, Ken (November 2, 1999). "CHAMPCAR/CART: Tributes mount for racing hero". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via motorsport.com.
  7. ^ a b c d McAleer, Brendan (October 31, 2014). "Revisiting driver Greg Moore's notable life through B.C." Driving.ca. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  8. ^ a b Coats, Bill (May 16, 1998). "Moore is better so far this year in CART". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. p. 14. Retrieved May 19, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "CHAMPCAR/CART: Greg Moore's No 99 is Retired". motorsport.com. November 24, 1999. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d e Cavin, Curt (October 29, 2009). "10 Years Later: Remembering Greg Moore". Autoweek. Archived from the original on July 22, 2018. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  11. ^ a b S. Chengus, Angelique (May 23, 1996). "Next 'Great One' racing at U.S. 500". Battle Creek Enquirer. Gannett News Service. p. 16. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ a b Mooney, Loren (May 25, 1998). "This Kid Can Drive". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 13, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  13. ^ MacIntyre, Iain (November 3, 1999). "Moore pal presses for safer circuits". Vancouver Sun. p. A2. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ a b c d e Greg Moore - A Racer's Story (Television production). Vancouver, British Columbia: The Sports Network. August 31, 2001. Event occurs at 00:05:23 – 00:17:35.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Cosgrove, Michael (July 14, 1993). "Racer wise beyond his years". The Globe and Mail. p. C6. Retrieved May 19, 2019 – via Biography in Context.
  16. ^ a b c Miller, Robin (October 30, 2014). "IndyCar: Greg Moore – never forgotten". Racer. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  17. ^ a b "Canadian Formula Ford Championship". Autocourse. Archived from the original on November 7, 2003. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  18. ^ "NA-F2000: F2000 Hall of Fame Nominees". motorsport.com. April 12, 1999. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  19. ^ MacIntyre, Iain (October 19, 1995). "Go-karts to IndyCar took Moore just five years". Vancouver Sun. p. E1. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ a b McDonald, Norris (October 31, 2009). "Greg Moore's passion took him right to the top". Toronto Sun. Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  21. ^ MacIntyre, Iain (September 2, 1994). "Death of illusions part of growing up on track for Moore". Vancouver Sun. p. D18. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b "Greg Moore – 1993 Firestone / Dayton Indy Lights Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  23. ^ "Moore becomes youngest Indy Lights race champion". Vancouver Sun. April 11, 1994. p. D3. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b "Greg Moore – 1994 Firestone / Dayton Indy Lights Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  25. ^ "Moore on move". Ottawa Citizen. November 19, 1994. p. G8. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Malsher, David (March 2005). "The Player's Player -- Greg Moore". Motor Sport. LXXXI (3): 74–77. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  27. ^ Moses, Sam (September 14, 1998). "Untapped Potential". Autoweek. 48 (38): 42. ISSN 0192-9674 – via ESBCO Academic Search Complete.
  28. ^ Cosgrove, Michael (March 3, 1995). "Moore expecting breakthrough year Driver happy with new Indy Lights team". The Globe and Mail. p. D13. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Biography in Context.
  29. ^ "Moore has savvy to know when to shift gears". Calgary Herald. August 9, 1995. p. D2. Retrieved May 19, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "CART – Drivers – Greg Moore – Career". Championship Auto Racing Teams. Archived from the original on December 1, 1998. Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  31. ^ a b "Greg Moore – 1995 Firestone / Dayton Indy Lights Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  32. ^ "PIR has matured in 10 years with Jobe". The Arizona Republic. September 16, 1995. p. C1. Retrieved May 21, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Sport in Brief: Auto racing Canadians wheel up". The Globe and Mail. October 19, 1995. p. E6. Retrieved May 21, 2019 – via Biography in Context.
  34. ^ Bartel, Mario (March 1996). "The Fastest Man From Maple Ridge". Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows News. Archived from the original on May 8, 2017. Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  35. ^ Harris, Mike (April 25, 1999). "Young not wasted on CART Leader: Moore learns lessons early". The Commercial Appeal. Associated Press. p. D4. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Infotrac Newsstand.
  36. ^ Lomas, Gordon (April 2, 1996). "Rookie Makes Stunning Impact". The Courier-Mail. p. 035. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Infotrac Newsstand.
  37. ^ Fox, John Jay (April 29, 1996). "Moore Ran Out of Time: The Canadian Rookie's Car Ran Perfectly As He Grabbed His Best Finish After Starting 13th". The Morning Call. p. C01. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Infotrac Newsstand.
  38. ^ Pruett, Marshall (October 31, 2017). "The Record Books Don't Tell the Whole Story of Greg Moore". Road & Track. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  39. ^ a b "Greg Moore – 1996 CART Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  40. ^ Beacon, Bill (March 2, 1997). "Canadians in the race for Indy". Winnipeg Free Press. The Canadian Press. p. A13. Retrieved May 21, 2019 – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  41. ^ a b c "Greg Moore – 1997 CART Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  42. ^ "All Time indy Car Records (1946-2014)" (PDF). IndyCar Series. 2014. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 21, 2018. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  43. ^ "Moore Holds On, Wins Miller 200: Driver Outduels Andretti to Post First CART Victory". Wisconsin State Journal. June 2, 1997. p. 1D. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Infotrac Newsstand.
  44. ^ "Moore Wins As Teammates Come Up Empty". Chicago Tribune. Tribune News Services. June 9, 1997. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  45. ^ Houghton, Richard (August 22, 1997). "More expected of Moore in sophomore season". Edmonton Journal. p. D3. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ LeBrun, Pierre (March 16, 1998). "Andretti edges hard-charging Moore by .075". Calgary Herald. The Canadian Press. p. D7. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ a b c d e "Greg Moore – 1998 CART Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  48. ^ Harris, Mike (July 27, 1998). "Greg Moore Wins Deadly U.S. 500". Associated Press. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  49. ^ "Moore edges Franchitti for pole". The News-Press. Associated Press. October 4, 1998. p. 9C. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ "Vasser shoots past Moore for victory". The Pantagraph. November 2, 1998. p. D5. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ Rosewater, Amy (January 1999). "CART's Hope for the Future". Auto Racing Digest. 27 (1): 14–16. ISSN 0090-8029. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via EBSCO's Academic Search.
  52. ^ a b c Grange, Michael (February 9, 2000). "Moore takes pole on CART's memory lane". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  53. ^ "Moore favoured to win CART". Winnipeg Free Press. January 8, 1999. p. C2. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  54. ^ Huff, Richard (March 31, 1999). "CART drivers realizes less is Moore". New York Daily News. p. 295. Retrieved May 19, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ "Moore is better at Grand Prix". The Palm Beach Post. March 22, 1999. p. 1C. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  56. ^ "Losing is part of maturing in CART". The Commercial Appeal. March 28, 1999. p. D10. Retrieved March 22, 2019 – via Infotrac Newsstand.
  57. ^ a b c d "Greg Moore 1999 Record". The Washington Post. 1999. Archived from the original on October 2, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  58. ^ Kingston, Gary (September 1, 1999). "Moore is not enjoying a vintage season". Vancouver Sun. p. E6. Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  59. ^ Ralph, Dan (July 14, 1999). "Moore talk of switch". Medicine Hat News. The Canadian Press. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via NewspaperArchives.com.
  60. ^ Margolis, Bob (June 15, 1999). "Greg Moore to NASCAR Winston Cup, Part II". GoRacing.com. Archived from the original on May 24, 1999. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  61. ^ Poole, David (May 1, 1999). "Another open-wheel crossover?". Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on August 17, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  62. ^ "Moore confirms NASCAR talks". The Sports Network. July 29, 1999. Archived from the original on January 27, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  63. ^ a b "June 1999 News Archives". Jayski's Silly Season Site. June 1999. Archived from the original on May 22, 2019. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  64. ^ "Forsythe: I did try to keep Moore". Autosport. October 7, 1999. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  65. ^ McGee, Ryan (March 24, 2009). "One turbulent ride for Castroneves". ESPN. Retrieved January 29, 2018.
  66. ^ Atkins, Harry (August 7, 1999). "De Ferran, Moore Ink Penske Deal". Associated Press. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  67. ^ "When will Formula One officials stop stepping on their tongues?". The Arizona Republic. June 14, 1997. p. C2. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  68. ^ "Complete Archive of Greg Moore". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  69. ^ "IROC Announces 1999 Drivers". The Auto Channel. February 5, 1999. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  70. ^ a b "Greg Moore – 1999 IROC Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2019.
  71. ^ a b c d Harris, Mike (October 31, 1999). "Moore killed in Marlboro 500 crash". Las Vegas Sun. Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  72. ^ a b c Kupper, Mike (November 1, 1999). "Crash Kills Canadian Driver". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  73. ^ a b c Callahan, Terry (October 31, 1999). "The Callahan Report: Tragedy strikes the Marlboro 500; Greg Moore killed". The Auto Channel. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  74. ^ Hinton, Ed (November 8, 1999). "Wheels Of Fortune Greg Moore's sudden death won't change the way open-wheel racers think". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  75. ^ Reininger, David (October 31, 1999). "CHAMPCAR/CART: Greg Moore Killed at California Speedway". motorsport.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  76. ^ a b "Ten years on: Greg Moore remembered". motorsport.com. November 4, 2009. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  77. ^ "Canada Sportsbreak: Hopes, dreams and huge potential die with young". Resource News International. November 1, 1999. p. 1008305u1957. Retrieved May 24, 2019 – via General OneFile.
  78. ^ a b c Glick, Shav (November 1, 1999). "Moore Dies in the Latest Racing Tragedy". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  79. ^ Houle, Bertrand (November 17, 2014). "L'énigme Greg Moore" (in French). Réseau des sports. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  80. ^ Miller, Jeff (November 2, 1999). "'Just Not Here For This': Auto racing stunned by Moore's death". The Post-Standard. p. C2. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019 – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  81. ^ a b c Mauk, Eric (December 20, 1999). "Data Inconclusive To Cause Of Greg Moore Crash". Racer. Archived from the original on March 4, 2000. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  82. ^ a b Miller, Robin (November 7, 1999). "Angle of impact caused Moore's death". The Indianapolis Star. p. C7. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  83. ^ "Tributes pour in for race car driver Greg Moore". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. November 3, 1999. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  84. ^ a b Harris, Mike (November 3, 1999). "'Things happen at speed,' Moore said". ESPN. Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  85. ^ Henderson, Martin (November 1, 1999). "ESPN Handles Fatal Crash Tastefully". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  86. ^ Peters, Ken (November 2, 1999). "CART banquet goes on, but with solemn overtone". The Independent. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  87. ^ MacQueen, Ken (November 2, 1999). "Tributes mount for racing hero". Vancouver Sun. p. 1. Retrieved May 24, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  88. ^ Ferriss, Paul (2001). Never Too Fast: The Paul Tracy Story. Toronto, Canada: ECW Press. p. 164. ISBN 978-1-55022-469-6. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  89. ^ "Greg Moore's life celebrated". Calgary Herald. The Canadian Press. November 4, 1999. p. D2. Retrieved May 24, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  90. ^ "Hundreds of Moore's fans pay respects". ESPN. Associated Press. November 5, 1999. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  91. ^ Morales, Enrique (October 31, 2009). "Red Gloves Still Rule: Remembering Greg Moore". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  92. ^ "The helmet is the one piece of equipment that says something about the Indy driver". Vancouver Sun. August 27, 1997. p. 56. Retrieved May 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  93. ^ a b Busbee, Jay (May 24, 2013). "James Hinchcliffe pays tribute to his friend Greg Moore at Indy 500". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  94. ^ MacIntyre, Iain (November 5, 1999). "Greg Moore surprised us in life and in death". Vancouver Sun. p. E6. Retrieved May 18, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  95. ^ a b Oreovicz, John (October 30, 2009). "When racing lost its brightest star ..." ESPN. Archived from the original on November 2, 2009. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  96. ^ a b Beamish, Mike (October 30, 2019). "Remembering racing champion Greg Moore 20 years after his death". National Post. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  97. ^ a b c Tomas, Erik (October 31, 2014). "Godspeed Greg Moore, you were taken far too soon". Sportsnet. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  98. ^ a b c Wallcraft, Stephanie (October 31, 2019). "20 Years On, Greg Moore's Legacy Endures Through Red Gloves". Wheels.ca. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  99. ^ a b El-Bashir, Tarik (May 2, 1999). "Auto Racing; Drivers Enjoying Life as Brat Pack". The New York Times. p. 8008004. Archived from the original on September 12, 2017. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  100. ^ a b Myslenski, Skip (July 8, 1999). "In Their Own World". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  101. ^ Hallbery, Andy; Husband, Johanna (October 31, 2019). "Remembering Greg Moore – the lost bright star of motorsport". Autosport. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  102. ^ a b c "CART Announces Creation of Greg Moore Legacy Award". Championship Auto Racing Teams. September 1, 2000. Archived from the original on February 10, 2001. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  103. ^ Garbutt, Herb (October 8, 2010). "Winning Greg Moore award extra special for Hinchcliffe". Oakville Beaver. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  104. ^ DiZinno, Tony (April 22, 2013). "Greg Moore would have been 38 today". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  105. ^ a b c Kerr, Grant (June 22, 2000). "Vancouver celebrates Moore's legacy". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on May 20, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  106. ^ a b Morris, Jim (June 21, 2000). "Vancouver Indy honours Moore". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  107. ^ "Greg Moore". Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  108. ^ "Greg Moore". BC Sports Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  109. ^ Weber, Marc (January 17, 2016). "Treasures of the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame: Greg Moore's Radio Flyer". The Province. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  110. ^ Gregg, Mike. "Greg Moore Raceway". West Coast Kart Club. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  111. ^ Melnychuk, Phil (October 21, 2011). "Maple Ridge youth centre 'a leading facility'". Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows News. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  112. ^ "New ER and Patient Care Centre Opens in Maple Ridge" (Press release). Government of British Columbia. January 29, 2009. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  113. ^ MacIntyre, Iain (August 30, 2000). "Greg Moore had strong ties to home". Vancouver Sun. p. K4. Retrieved May 24, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  114. ^ "CHAMPCAR/CART: Greg Moore documentary released". motorsport.com. June 22, 2001. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  115. ^ "Franchitti dedicates win to Moore". Crash. June 29, 2002. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  116. ^ "Franchitti victory for late friend Moore". Speedcafe. October 18, 2009. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  117. ^ "The top 50 drivers who never raced in F1". Autosport. July 26, 2013. Archived from the original on December 21, 2018. Retrieved December 21, 2018.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Gonzalo Rodríguez
Fatalities in CART/IndyCar
1999
Succeeded by
Tony Renna
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Steve Robertson
Indy Lights Champion
1995
Succeeded by
David Empringham