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Greer County is a county located along the southwest border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,239.[1] Its county seat is Mangum.[2] From 1860 to 1896, the state of Texas claimed an area known as Greer County, Texas, which included present-day Greer County along with neighboring areas. In 1896 it was designated as a county in Oklahoma Territory under a ruling by the US Supreme Court.[3]

Greer County
Greer County Courthouse in Mangum
Greer County Courthouse in Mangum
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Greer County
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Map of the United States highlighting Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°56′N 99°34′W / 34.93°N 99.56°W / 34.93; -99.56
Country United States
State Oklahoma
Founded1896
SeatMangum
Largest cityMangum
Area
 • Total644 sq mi (1,670 km2)
 • Land639 sq mi (1,660 km2)
 • Water4.3 sq mi (11 km2)  0.7%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2013)
6,171
 • Density9.8/sq mi (3.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitegreer.okcounties.org

The rural Greer County is home to Quartz Mountain Nature Park, near the community of Lone Wolf, Oklahoma (known until 2002 as Quartz Mountain State Park). It is also home to the Oklahoma State Reformatory, located in Granite.[4] Its population has declined since 1930 due to changes in agriculture and migration to cities for work.

HistoryEdit

After a dispute over the 1819 Adams-Onís Treaty and the related 1828 Treaty of Limits, the governments of both the United States and the state of Texas claimed ownership of some 1.5 million acres (6,000 km²) in what was then operated as Greer County, Texas. The county was named for former Texas lieutenant governor, John A. Greer.[4] Litigation followed, and in the case of United States v. State of Texas 162 U.S. 1 (1896), with a ruling issued on March 16, the Supreme Court, having original jurisdiction over the case, decided in favor of the United States.

The county was assigned to the Oklahoma Territory on May 4, 1896. When Oklahoma was admitted as a state, Greer County was established according to its current boundaries; the remaining former county area was organized as Harmon, Jackson, and part of Beckham counties. The town of Mangum, designated as the county seat in 1886 when this was part of Texas, continued as the seat of Greer County, Oklahoma.[4] From its establishment until at least 1903, Greer County was a sundown county, prohibiting African Americans from living in the county.[5]

Originally developed for agriculture, the rural county had its peak of population in 1930. Mechanization of agriculture reduced the need for farm labor, and the population has declined as people migrated to cities for work.

Among the county attractions is Quartz Mountain Nature Park (known until 2002 as Quartz Mountain State Park), near the community of Lone Wolf.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 644 square miles (1,670 km2), of which 639 square miles (1,660 km2) is land and 4.3 square miles (11 km2) (0.7%) is water.[6]

Western Greer County lies in the Gypsum Hills, while the eastern one-third is in the Red Bed Plains physiographic region. The county is drained by the North Fork Red River, Elm Fork Red River, and Salt Fork Red River.[4]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
191016,449
192015,836−3.7%
193020,28228.1%
194014,550−28.3%
195011,749−19.3%
19608,877−24.4%
19707,979−10.1%
19807,028−11.9%
19906,559−6.7%
20006,061−7.6%
20106,2392.9%
Est. 20165,998[7]−3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 6,061 people, 2,237 households, and 1,442 families residing in the county. The population density was 10 people per square mile (4/km²). There were 2,788 housing units at an average density of 4 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 81.46% White, 8.78% Black or African American, 2.47% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.99% from other races, and 3.02% from two or more races. 7.44% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,237 households out of which 25.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.00% were married couples living together, 9.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.50% were non-families. 33.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the county, the population was spread out with 20.00% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 28.40% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 20.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 123.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 129.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,793, and the median income for a family was $30,702. Males had a median income of $24,318 versus $18,641 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,053. About 15.00% of families and 19.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.40% of those under age 18 and 14.80% of those age 65 or over.

PoliticsEdit

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019[13]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 1,546 55.85%
Republican 890 32.15%
Others 332 11.99%
Total 2,768 100%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 78.2% 1,482 17.0% 323 4.8% 91
2012 73.4% 1,344 26.6% 488
2008 73.2% 1,548 26.8% 566
2004 68.0% 1,529 32.0% 719
2000 59.8% 1,287 39.0% 839 1.2% 26
1996 36.0% 905 49.3% 1,240 14.8% 372
1992 34.7% 964 41.8% 1,162 23.5% 653
1988 48.9% 1,225 50.2% 1,256 0.9% 22
1984 57.4% 1,664 42.1% 1,220 0.6% 17
1980 49.5% 1,535 48.1% 1,492 2.3% 72
1976 35.2% 1,164 63.9% 2,113 0.9% 31
1972 66.4% 2,154 31.0% 1,004 2.7% 86
1968 35.3% 1,225 40.9% 1,419 23.9% 830
1964 31.8% 1,247 68.2% 2,671
1960 56.0% 2,158 44.0% 1,698
1956 44.0% 1,499 56.0% 1,907
1952 48.1% 2,147 52.0% 2,321
1948 19.0% 713 81.0% 3,044
1944 26.5% 1,075 73.4% 2,984 0.1% 5
1940 25.2% 1,195 74.4% 3,524 0.4% 21
1936 16.9% 766 82.8% 3,745 0.2% 11
1932 9.0% 418 91.0% 4,240
1928 57.5% 2,262 41.8% 1,645 0.7% 28
1924 19.5% 551 70.1% 1,982 10.4% 293
1920 32.8% 1,013 59.9% 1,854 7.3% 226
1916 14.6% 369 66.3% 1,675 19.1% 483
1912 16.8% 351 63.9% 1,334 19.3% 404

EconomyEdit

The county's economy has been based on farming and raising livestock. In 1907, the main crops were cotton, corn, oats, wheat and alfalfa. Livestock raised includes cattle, horses, mules, swine, sheep and goats.[4]

The Oklahoma State Reformatory is located in Granite in the county and provides some jobs.[4]

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

Mangum (county seat)

TownsEdit

Granite

Willow

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Brinkman

Reed

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 9, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "Oklahoma: Individual County Chronologies". Oklahoma Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. Retrieved February 24, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Greer County. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  5. ^ "Ban Placed on Negroes". Scott County Kicker. Benton, Missouri. September 5, 1903. p. 2 – via Chronicling America. Because the ban has been placed on the negroes by the citizens of Greer county, Okla., there will be an estimated loss of 5,000 bales of this year's cotton crop. Greer county, which, until a few years ago, was a part of Texas, is one of the big cotton producers of the territory. This year the farmers raised 20 per cent. increased acreage and a 15-per-cent. increase yield, but there is a labor famine. The growers have been threatened by the citizens in general upon every attempt to import negroes, but unless the necessary laborers are secured in the immediate future the financial loss will be great. The growers now have a movement on foot to bring 100 Mexican families to pick the cotton crop. Since the organization of Greer county no negroes have been allowed to live within its boundaries.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  13. ^ "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov. January 15, 2019. Retrieved 2019-02-27.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-29.

External linksEdit