Grdelica

Grdelica (Serbian Cyrillic: Грделица) is a town in southern Serbia. It is situated in the Leskovac municipality, in the Jablanica District. The total population of the town was 3,194 people as of the 2011 census. For census purposes, Grdelica is divided into two adjacent parts, southern "Grdelica town" (Grdelica varoš; population 2,136) and northern "Grdelica village" (Grdelica selo; 1,058).[1]

Grdelica

Грделица
Grdelica.jpg
Grdelica is located in Serbia
Grdelica
Grdelica
Coordinates: 42°53′33″N 22°04′21″E / 42.89250°N 22.07250°E / 42.89250; 22.07250Coordinates: 42°53′33″N 22°04′21″E / 42.89250°N 22.07250°E / 42.89250; 22.07250
CountrySerbia
DistrictJablanica District
MunicipalityLeskovac
Population
 (2011)[1]
 • Town3,194
 • Urban
2,136
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
16220
Area code(s)016
Vehicle registrationLE

Grdelica lies at the South Morava river, on the mountainous terrain at the entrance of the Grdelica Gorge. It lies at an important transport route, on the main road and railway corridor linking Serbia with Macedonia and Greece. As of 2016, the section around Grdelica is the last part of the A1 motorway to be completed to a full dual carriageway profile.

It is the largest settlement on the route from Leskovac to Vranje, and it was a seat of a municipality until absorbed by the Leskovac municipality in the 1960s.

Grdelica has a football stadium (the name of the football team is "FK Jedinstvo"), a basketball court and a swimming pool. "Desanka Maksimović" is the name of the primary school. Woodworks "Danilo Bošković" and "Textile Industry Grdelica (TIG)" are two major factories.

HistoryEdit

It was part of an Iron Age culture, with 8th-century-BC pottery found in the downstream river.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "2011 Census of Population, Households and Dwellings in the Republic of Serbia: Comparative Overview of the Number of Population in 1948, 1953, 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991, 2002 and 2011, Data by settlements" (PDF). Statistical Office of Republic Of Serbia, Belgrade. 2014. p. 109. ISBN 978-86-6161-109-4. Retrieved 2014-06-27.
  2. ^ http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0350-0241/2007/0350-02410757175S.pdf