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Grammy Award for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

The Grammy Award for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards.[1] According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide it is designed for pop recordings by duo/groups or collaborative performances (vocal or instrumental) and is limited to singles or tracks only.[2]

Grammy Award for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance
Awarded forquality vocals or instrumental duo/group or collaborative pop recordings
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
Currently held byLady Gaga & Bradley Cooper, "Shallow" (2019)
Websitegrammy.com

It was one of several new categories for the annual Grammy Awards ceremony to start from 2012. It combines the previous categories for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals, Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals and Best Pop Instrumental Performance. The restructuring of these categories was a result of the Recording Academy's wish to decrease the list of categories and awards and to eliminate the distinctions between collaborations and duo or groups.

Contents

RecipientsEdit

 
2012 winner Amy Winehouse received her first posthumous award along with Tony Bennett
 
Three-time nominee and 2015 winner Christina Aguilera
 
2019 winners Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper
Year[I] Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
2012 Tony Bennett and Amy Winehouse "Body and Soul" [3]
2013 Gotye featuring Kimbra "Somebody That I Used to Know" [4]
2014 Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers "Get Lucky" [5]
2015 A Great Big World and Christina Aguilera "Say Something" [6]
2016 Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars "Uptown Funk" [7]
2017 Twenty One Pilots "Stressed Out"
[8]
2018 Portugal. The Man "Feel It Still" [9]
2019 Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper "Shallow" [10]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

Artists with multiple nominationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  2. ^ "Category Mapper". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on June 4, 2012. Retrieved November 25, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ "2011 – 54th Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees And Winners: Pop Field". The Recording Academy. November 30, 2011.
  4. ^ "Grammys 2013: Winners List". Billboard. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  5. ^ "56th GRAMMY Awards: Full Winners List". Billboard. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  6. ^ "57th Grammy Nominees". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 5, 2014.
  7. ^ "58th Grammy Nominees". Grammy. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. ^ "59th Grammy Nominees". Grammy. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ Grammy.com, 28 November 2017
  10. ^ Grammy.com, 07 December 2018

External linksEdit