Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

The Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC) is a series of conferences designed to bring the research and career interests of women in computing to the forefront. It is the world's largest gathering of women in computing. The celebration, named after computer scientist Grace Hopper, is organized by the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. GHC 2022 conference was held hybrid in Orlando and virtually at the end of September 2022.

Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing
AbbreviationGHC
DisciplineComputer science
Publication details
PublisherAnita Borg Institute for Women and Technology and Association for Computing Machinery
History1994-current
FrequencyAnnual

HistoryEdit

In 1994, Anita Borg and Telle Whitney founded the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. With the initial idea of creating a conference by and for women computer scientists, Borg and Whitney met over dinner, with a blank sheet of paper, having no idea how to start a conference, and started to plan out their vision. The first Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing was held in Washington, D.C., in June 1994, and brought together 500 technical women.[1] More than a dozen conferences have been held from 1994 to the present; the second was held in 1997 and the conference has been held annually since 2006.[2] The sold-out 2010 conference attracted 2,147 attendees from 29 countries. Beginning in 2011, the conference has been held in a convention center to accommodate its growing size.[3]

Conference structureEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration consists of a combination of technical sessions and career sessions and includes a poster session, career fair, awards ceremony, and more. The conference features 650 presenters. Potential presenters submit proposals for panels, workshops, presentations, Birds of a Feather sessions, New Investigators papers, PhD Forum, and Poster Session, including ACM Student Research Competition.[4]

Tracks/ContentEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration 2022 featured content in 14 tracks:

  1. Academic
  2. Artificial Intelligence
  3. Career
  4. Computer Systems Engineering
  5. Data Science
  6. Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging
  7. Extended Reality, Media and Gaming
  8. Hardware
  9. Human Computer Interaction
  10. Non- Traditional Technology
  11. Open Source & Open Source Day
  12. Product Management
  13. Security/Privacy
  14. Software Engineering

Keynote SpeakersEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration features prominent women in technology. Keynote speakers at Grace Hopper Celebration 2022 included Daphe Koller, Dr. Anita Hill, Megan Rapinoe, Anne Neuberger and Frances Haugen.[5]

Past keynote speakers included Sheryl Sandberg, Shirley Jackson, Carol Bartz, Duy-Loan Le, Kathy Pham, Megan Smith, Ginni Rometty, Nonny de la Peña, Maria Klawe, Frances E. Allen, Mary Lou Jepsen, Barbara Liskov, Susan Landau, Jennifer Mankoff, Vivienne Ming, Susan L. Graham, Melinda Gates, and Fernanda Viegas. Speaker presentations are available to watch online after the conference.[6][7]

Poster Session and ACM Student Research CompetitionEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration features one of the largest technical poster sessions of any conference, with over 175 posters.[8] Presenters can choose to have their posters considered for the ACM Student Research Competition (SRC) at the Grace Hopper Celebration, the largest SRC of any technical conference.[9]

AwardsEdit

The Abie Awards honor women technologists and those who support women in tech. The 2022 Abie Award Winners were:

  1. Daphne Koller (San Francisco, California) - Technical Leadership Award Winner
  2. Kris Dorsey (Boston, Massachusetts) - Emerging Leader Award in Honor of Denice Denton Award Winner
  3. Katherine Vergara (Santiago, Chile) - Student of Vision Award Winner
  4. Paula Coto (Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina) - Change Agent Award Winner
  5. Neha Narkhede (Menlo Park, California) - Technology Entrepreneurship Award Winner

Past Abie Award winners include Ruzena Bajcsy, BlogHer, Elaine Weyuker and Unoma Ndili Okorafor.

CRA-W Career Mentoring WorkshopsEdit

The Computing Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W) sponsors a series of sessions at the Grace Hopper Celebration aimed at undergraduates, graduates, and early career researchers. Sessions cover topics such as applying to graduate school, publishing papers, networking, work-life balance, and more.[10]

K-12 Computing Teachers WorkshopEdit

Hosted by the Computer Science Teachers Association and the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology, the K-12 Computing Teachers Workshop is a two-day event for K-12 teachers, covering challenges and ways to involve more girls in computer science. The workshop began in 2009, attracting more than 650 applications its first year.[11]

Technical Executive ForumEdit

Begun in 2007, the Technical Executive Forum convenes high-level technology executives to discuss challenges and share solutions for recruiting, retaining, and advancing technical women. In 2010, 65 executives attended the event, from companies including Microsoft, Google, and Symantec.[12]

Senior Women’s SummitEdit

The Senior Women's Summit is a one-day event held at the Grace Hopper Celebration, that brings together senior-level women to discuss issues facing senior technical women and provide a learning and networking platform.[13]

Grace Hopper Open Source DayEdit

Grace Hopper Open Source Day was held for the first time in 2011. One-day registration is open to the public and included for all conference attendees. The event includes a codeathon, skill-building workshop, and exhibition space featuring open source projects.[14]

 
Group collaborating on Wikimedia projects at Grace Hopper Open Source Day

Participating organizations have included Google Crisis Response, Mozilla, Sahana Software Foundation, The Women's Peer-to-Peer Network, ODK, Microsoft Disaster Response, OpenHatch, Wikimedia Foundation, E-Democracy, Systers, WordPress and OpenStack.[15]

Career FairEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration features a career fair with over 70 high-tech companies, government labs, and universities.[16]

ScholarshipsEdit

Students make up approximately half of the attendees at the Grace Hopper Celebration. The Anita Borg Institute offers scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students to attend the conference. The scholarship includes:

  • Individual registration for the three-day conference
  • Hotel accommodations
  • Meal card for use at the convention center during the conference
  • Airfare
  • Travel stipend

In 2010, 321 scholarships were awarded.[17] In addition to the GHC Scholarship, Anita Borg Institute offers the ABI-Heinz College Partnership Program. This is designed for students who have successfully completed their bachelor's degree, have been named a GHC Scholar by AnitaB.org, and are interested in obtaining a master's degree from the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University. GHC Scholars who are accepted into master's programs at the Heinz college are eligible for tuition scholarships of a minimum of $6,000 per semester.[18]

Childcare and nursing mothers' roomEdit

The Grace Hopper Celebration offers free childcare to all attendees, as well as an on-site nursing mothers' room.[19]

Open Source DayEdit

Open Source Day (OSD) is the largest celebration of women in open source. OSD is an all-day hackathon (including workshops) at Grace Hopper Celebration in which participants of all skill levels learn about Open Source while contributing to projects designed to solve real-world problems. OSD is organized in two parts: projects for contributions and hands-on workshops for upskilling.

Open Source Day 2022Edit

Open Source Day 2022 (OSD22) took place virtually on September 16, 2022 and was open to all GHC22 ticket holders for participation.[20] The Opening Ceremony of OSD22 featured Anne Neuberger, Nithya Ruff and Mishi Choudhary. OSD22 hosted 27 open source projects and 10 workshops.

Participants contributed code to 27 open source projects.

CriticismsEdit

The GHC conference has been criticized for a lack of diversity, particularly racial diversity,[21] and financial inaccessibility due to the high cost of attendance.[22][23] In 2019, the cost of registration, not including hotel, transportation, or other costs, was $450 for students, $600 for academics, and $1,150 for general registration.[24]

In 2015, GHC faced criticism, including from engineer Erica Baker, when two White men and zero black women were featured as "headline" speakers.[25] The organization responded by targeting more diversity in speakers and collecting race and ethnicity data at the following year's event.[26]

GHC does not pay its speakers. In past years GHC required speakers to purchase their own conference ticket, but as of 2020, speakers receive complimentary registration. (In the case of two selected poster presenters, only one will receive complimentary registration.) Speakers are not paid and travel and hotel expenses are not covered.[27] The "pay to speak" approach has been criticized by people including author and software engineer Gayle Laakmann McDowell.[28]

List of Grace Hopper CelebrationsEdit

Past Grace Hopper Celebrations include:[29]

Year Location Theme Date # of attendees Links
2022 Orlando, Florida & Virtual event ”Next is Now” September 20 – 23 Website
2021 Virtual event September 27 – Oct 1 29,120[30] Website
2020 Virtual event "Together We Build" September 26, 29 - Oct 3 Website
2019 Orlando, Florida "We Will Change the World" October 2-4 25,000[31] Website Archived 2019-03-24 at the Wayback Machine
2018 Houston, Texas "We Are Here" September 26–28 20,000[32] Website
2017 Orlando, Florida October 4 – 6 18,000[33] Website Archived 2017-10-04 at the Wayback Machine
2016 Houston, Texas October 19 – 21 15,000[34] Website
2015 Houston, Texas "Our Time to Lead" October 14 – 16 11,702[35] Website
2014 Phoenix, Arizona "Everywhere. Everyone." October 8 – 10 7,830[35] Website
2013 Minneapolis, Minnesota "Think Big. Drive Forward" October 2 – 5 4,758[35] Website Archived 2013-03-14 at the Wayback Machine
2012 Baltimore, Maryland “Are We There Yet?” October 3 – 6 3,592[35] Website
2011 Portland, Oregon “What If…?” November 9 – 12 2,784[35] Website
2010 Atlanta, Georgia “Collaborating Across Boundaries” Sep. 28 – Oct. 2 2,070[35] Website
2009 Tucson, Arizona “Creating Technology for Social Good” Sep. 30 – Oct. 3 1,571[35] Website
2008 Keystone, Colorado “We Build a Better World” Oct. 1 – 4 1,446[35] Website
2007 Orlando, Florida “I Invent the Future” Oct. 17 – 20 1,430[35] Website
2006 San Diego, California “Making Waves” Oct. 3 – 7 1,347[35] Website
2004 Chicago, Illinois “Making History” Oct. 6 – 9 899[35] Website
2002 Vancouver, Canada “Ubiquity” Oct. 9 – 12 630[35]
2000 Hyannis, Massachusetts “Interconnections” Sep. 14 – 16 550[35]
1997 San Jose, California Sep. 19 – 21 600[35]
1994 Washington, D.C. June 9 – 11 500[35]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Anita Borg Celebration: Changing the World for Women and Technology". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. YouTube. 14 June 2011. Retrieved 22 June 2011.
  2. ^ Colborn, Kate (December 2008 – January 2009). "2008 Grace Hopper Celebration: "We build a better world"". Diversity/Careers. Diversity/Careers. Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  3. ^ Colborn, Kate (December 2010 – January 2011). "Largest ever Grace Hopper Celebration brings tech women together "across boundaries"". Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  4. ^ "Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Opens Call for Participation". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Retrieved 26 June 2011.
  5. ^ "GHC 2022 S&S". Grace Hopper Celebration. Retrieved 2022-10-16.
  6. ^ "Grace Hopper 2010". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. YouTube. Retrieved 26 June 2011.
  7. ^ "vGHC 21 Speaker Certificate List". Grace Hopper Celebration. Retrieved 2022-09-19.
  8. ^ "Call for Participation". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Retrieved 27 June 2011.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ "ACM Student Research Contest Honors Student Innovations". Association for Computing Machinery. 7 June 2011. Archived from the original on 18 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  10. ^ Ordille, Joann J. (January 2010). "CRA-W Showcases Its Programs at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing". Computing Research News. Computing Research Association. Retrieved 26 June 2011.
  11. ^ "Dr. Suzanne Westbrook Brings First K-12 Computing Teachers Workshop to Tucson". University of Arizona Computer Science Events & News. Arizona Board of Regents. 4 November 2009. Retrieved 28 June 2011.
  12. ^ Vivek, Wadwa; Whitney, Telle] (8 October 2010). "Practical Ways to Get More Women to Lead Businesses". Bloomberg Businessweek. Bloomberg. Retrieved 28 June 2011.
  13. ^ "Senior Women's Summit". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  14. ^ "Grace Hopper Open Source Day". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  15. ^ "Grace Hopper Open Source Day 2013". Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Archived from the original on 5 October 2013. Retrieved 5 October 2013.
  16. ^ "Registration Now Open for the 2011 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. 7 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  17. ^ Gilmartin, Shannon. "Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 2010 Evaluation and Impact Report". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  18. ^ "Heinz College Admissions". heinz college.
  19. ^ "2019 Child Care and Nursing Mothers". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Retrieved 22 Oct 2019.
  20. ^ "Open Source Day". Grace Hopper Celebration. Retrieved 2022-10-16.
  21. ^ Dickey, Megan Rose (20 October 2016). "Grace Hopper organizers struggle to practice the diversity they advocate". TechCrunch. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  22. ^ Hinchliffe, Emma (10 October 2017). "The energy at the Grace Hopper Celebration is enough to make you less cynical about tech". Mashable. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  23. ^ Muthukumar, Raksha (12 November 2019). "The case against Grace Hopper Celebration". TechCrunch. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  24. ^ "2019 FAQ". Grace Hopper Celebration. AnitaB.org. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  25. ^ Baker, Erica Joy (7 October 2015). "#FFFFFF Diversity". Medium. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  26. ^ "GHC 16: Reflecting Our Community's Diversity". Grace Hopper Celebration. AnitaB.org. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  27. ^ "GHC 20 Speakers FAQ". Grace Hopper Celebration. AnitaB.org. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  28. ^ Laakman McDowell, Gayle (29 February 2016). "Why I Won't Be Speaking at the Grace Hopper Conference". Medium. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  29. ^ "History of the Conference". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 22 June 2011.
  30. ^ "GHC 22 Prospectus".
  31. ^ "GHC 19 Impact Report".
  32. ^ "Attend GHC 18 - Grace Hopper Celebration".
  33. ^ "Attend GHC 17 - Grace Hopper Celebration".
  34. ^ "Attend GHC 16 - Grace Hopper Celebration".
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "GHC 2015 Impact Report" (PDF). Anita Borg Institute. 2016.

External linksEdit