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Graben-Neudorf is a town in Northern Karlsruhe Country in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It was created when the two communities of Graben and Neudorf were united on January 1, 1972. With this union Neudorf was transferred from the district of Bruchsal to the district of Karlsruhe. [2]

Graben-Neudorf
Coat of arms of Graben-Neudorf
Coat of arms
Location of Graben-Neudorf
Graben-Neudorf is located in Germany
Graben-Neudorf
Graben-Neudorf
Graben-Neudorf is located in Baden-Württemberg
Graben-Neudorf
Graben-Neudorf
Coordinates: 49°09′33″N 08°29′22″E / 49.15917°N 8.48944°E / 49.15917; 8.48944Coordinates: 49°09′33″N 08°29′22″E / 49.15917°N 8.48944°E / 49.15917; 8.48944
CountryGermany
StateBaden-Württemberg
Admin. regionKarlsruhe
DistrictKarlsruhe
Government
 • MayorChristian Eheim
Area
{{{area_footnotes}}}
 • Total28.80 km2 (11.12 sq mi)
Elevation
107 m (351 ft)
Population
 (2017-12-31)[1]
 • Total12,083
 • Density420/km2 (1,100/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
76676
Dialling codes07255
Vehicle registrationKA
Websitewww.graben-neudorf.de

For more information about Graben-Neudorf see the article on the German Wikipedia website.

HistoryEdit

The village of Graben was probably created between the 5th and 7th century, though this isn't entirely certain. An ancient Roman road (partly visible to this day) connecting Kehl, Mühlburg, Heidelberg, and Neuenheim runs north/south through the Graben area. The discovery of Roman coins in the area suggest a Roman camp was located around the current site of the city.

The first documentary evidence of Graben only dates back to 1306. By the 14th and 15th century was Graben already a regional hub for trade as well as the church.

Graben came under the jurisdiction of the Margraviate of Baden in 1312.[3] When the Margraviate of Baden was divided between brothers Bernhard III. and Ernst in 1535, Graben came under the Margraviate of Baden-Durlach.[4] In 1771 when the Margraviate of Baden was reestablished Graben came under its jurisdiction.[5]

In 1556, Margrave Charles II of Baden-Durlach introduced Lutheranism in the Margraviate of Baden-Durlach. He also moved his residence from Pforzheim to Durlach giving the Margraviate its name.[6]

The wars of the 17th century brought great misery to Graben. The Thirty Years' War from 1618 to 1648 took a heavy toll. In 1622, Graben had 145 citizens, by 1648 there were only 42 citizens.[7]

In the War of the Grand Alliance (1688-1697), the French destroyed Graben, so that only the church, city hall and some buildings remained. The inhabitants of the village were forced into the forests and in the surrounding area. Peace, order and prosperity did not return until the middle of the 18th century.

The village of Neudorf ("new village") resulted from merging two settlements, first noted in 1497 as "Nuwdorff".

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Bevölkerung nach Nationalität und Geschlecht am 31. Dezember 2017". Statistisches Landesamt Baden-Württemberg (in German). 2018.
  2. ^ de:Graben-Neudorf
  3. ^ "Geschichtliches zum Ortsteil Graben," Gemeinde Graben-Neudorf (https://www.graben-neudorf.de/index.php?id=212 : accessed 25 Jul 2018)
  4. ^ Friedrich Kemm, Burg und Dorf Graben einst und jetzt: Ein Beitrag zur Heimatgeschichte in Wort und Bild (Bruchsal, Germany: Oskar Katz, 1920), p. 24.
  5. ^ Friedrich Kemm, Burg und Dorf Graben einst und jetzt: Ein Beitrag zur Heimatgeschichte in Wort und Bild (Bruchsal, Germany: Oskar Katz, 1920), p. 36.
  6. ^ Friedrich Kemm, Burg und Dorf Graben einst und jetzt: Ein Beitrag zur Heimatgeschichte in Wort und Bild (Bruchsal, Germany: Oskar Katz, 1920), p. 25.
  7. ^ Friedrich Kemm, Burg und Dorf Graben einst und jetzt: Ein Beitrag zur Heimatgeschichte in Wort und Bild (Bruchsal, Germany: Oskar Katz, 1920), p. 31.