Govia Thameslink Railway

Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) is a train operating company that operates the Thameslink, Southern and Great Northern (TSGN) rail franchise in England. Within the franchise, GTR runs the Thameslink, Great Northern, Southern and Gatwick Express services.[2] GTR is a subsidiary of Govia, which is itself a joint venture between the British Go-Ahead Group (65%) and French company Keolis (35%).

Govia Thameslink Railway
GoviaThameslinkRailway.png
700019 Shepreth Branch Junc 210619.jpg
A Thameslink Class 700 at Shepreth Branch Junction, south of Cambridge in 2019
Overview
Franchise(s)
Main region(s)
  • South East England
  • Greater London
  • East Anglia
Stations operated238
Parent company
Reporting markGN, GX, SN, TL
Other
Websitegtrailway.com

The franchise was awarded, after repeated delays, to Govia Thameslink Railway on 23 May 2014. On 14 September 2014, GTR took over operations for the prior franchisee First Capital Connect; during July 2015, both Southern and Gatwick Express operations were integrated into GTR. This change made it the largest rail franchise in terms of passengers, staff and fleet in the UK.[3] The franchise has an unusual structure involving a management contract that sees all fare revenues going straight to the Department for Transport (DfT), which in turn pays GTR fixed amounts that add up to £8.9 billion across its first seven years of operation.

GTR introduced several fleets of new trains, including Class 387s, Class 700s, and Class 717s. In terms of infrastructure, Govia planned to invest £50 million into the 239 stations it manages to improve accessibility, replace information systems, and increase staffing hours, alongside general redevelopment work. Various measures at increasing capacity and improving service were also planned, such as the doubling of overnight Thameslink services, half-hourly King's Lynn to London services, and extending the Oyster card network.

As early as June 2016, GTR was facing public criticism from officials over its performance, including calls from the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan for it to be stripped of the franchise. In May 2018, the company introduced a new timetable which included the first regular services through the Canal Tunnels and to other new destinations previously not served by Thameslink; however, an interim timetable that ran less trains had to be adopted due to frequent service issues. In response to the significant decline of passenger travel amid the COVID-19 pandemic, GTR considerably curtailed its services by mid-2020. GTR was one of several train operators that experienced severe disruption of services due to the 2022 United Kingdom railway strike.

HistoryEdit

BackgroundEdit

During 2006, the Thameslink and Great Northern services were merged into a single franchise due to the upcoming Thameslink Programme. In 2012, the British government announced that services of First Capital Connect, Southern (with Gatwick Express) and some Southeastern routes would be merged into a single Thameslink, Southern and Great Northern franchise (TSGN).[4] The Invitation to Tender was to have been issued in October 2012, with the successful bidder announced during Spring 2013 and TSGN originally due to start in September 2013. However, following the collapse of the InterCity West Coast re-franchising process, it was decided to enact a temporary freeze on all franchising competitions until January 2013.[5]

In January 2013, the government announced that it would extend the existing contract through to March 2014, and that it intended to negotiate with FirstGroup to operate the franchise under a management contract for up to two years.[6] In March 2013, the Secretary of State for Transport announced that the franchise would be extended again to run up to 13 September 2014, and that the future franchise would be a management-style contract due to the level of investment and change on the route.[7] During September 2013, a revised invitation to tender was issued.[8] On 23 May 2014, it was announced that Govia Thameslink Railway had been awarded the franchise.[9][10][11]

On 14 September 2014, Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) took over services from First Capital Connect; at the commencement of operations, it served 122 stations and operated a fleet of 226 trains.[12] The separate Thameslink and Great Northern brands were maintained upon the GTR takeover. During December 2014, full control was taken of the Sevenoaks Thameslink service, previously operated jointly with Southeastern. During July 2015, both Southern and Gatwick Express became a part of GTR, making it the largest rail franchise in terms of passengers, staff and fleet in the UK.[3][13]

The franchise has an unusual structure: it is a management contract where fare income does not go to GTR. Under their original contract, the Department for Transport pays GTR £8.9 billion over the first seven-year period and receives all revenue.[2] Consequently, the company carries less revenue risk. This form of franchise was chosen because of long-term engineering works anticipated around London, which would be a significant challenge to organise within the normal form of franchise.[14][15]

Changes and disruptionsEdit

During December 2015, GTR announced that the majority of its ticket prices would be frozen, and that the average fare rise for the coming year would be only 0.8%.[16]

In June 2016, amongst criticism of the performance of its services, Go-Ahead warned of lower than anticipated profits on the franchises, leading to 18% drop in the Go-Ahead share price. Passengers had previously rated its Thameslink service as the worst in the country. Only 20% of Southern trains arrived on time in the year from April 2015 to March 2016, and there was an ongoing industrial dispute over driver-only operated trains.[17][18][19] On 12 July 2016, after 15% of Southern services were cancelled for a period of weeks to improve service reliability, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan called for GTR to be stripped of the franchise.[20] On 15 July 2016, citing the issues, Rail Minister Claire Perry resigned from her position.[21]

In response to the significant decline of passenger travel amid the COVID-19 pandemic, GTR considerably curtailed its services by mid-2020.[22][23] Between 30 March 2020 and 3 April 2022, Gatwick Express services were suspended.[24][25]

GTR was one of several train operators impacted by the 2022 United Kingdom railway strike, which was the first national rail strike in the UK for three decades.[26] Its workers were amongst those who voted in favour of taking industrial action due to a dispute over pay and working conditions.[27] GTR was only capable of operating a very minimal timetable on any of the planned dates for the strikes due to the number of staff involved.[28][29]

Thameslink and Great Northern servicesEdit

Govia Thameslink Railway has operated Thameslink and Great Northern services since 14 September 2014. Thameslink is a 68-station main-line route running 225 km (140 mi) north to south through London from Bedford to Brighton, serving both London Gatwick Airport and London Luton Airport, with a suburban loop serving Sutton, Mitcham and Wimbledon and on weekdays a suburban line via Catford and Bromley South to Sevenoaks. Great Northern is the name of the suburban rail services run on the southern end of Britain's East Coast Main Line and associated branches. Services operate to or from London King's Cross and Moorgate. Destinations include Hertford North, Welwyn Garden City, Stevenage, Peterborough, Cambridge and King's Lynn.

In May 2018, the company introduced a new timetable which included the first regular services through the Canal Tunnels and to other new destinations previously not served by Thameslink. However, due to frequent disruption of services on the whole network, Govia decided to create a new interim timetable with a reduced number of trains; this came into operation in July 2018.[30]

Thameslink service patternEdit

Off-peakEdit

The published Thameslink off-peak service pattern as of December 2022, with frequencies in trains per hour (tph), includes:

Route tph Calling at
Letchworth Garden City to London King's Cross[31] 1
Cambridge to London King's Cross[31] 1
Cambridge to Brighton[31][32] 2
Peterborough to Horsham via Redhill[31][33] 2
Bedford to Brighton[34][32] 2
Bedford to Three Bridges via Redhill[34][35] 2
Luton to Rainham via Greenwich[34][36] 2
St Albans City to Sutton via Wimbledon (loop)[34][37] 2
  • Services then continue to/from St Albans City via Mitcham Junction (see below)
St Albans City to Sutton via Mitcham Junction (loop)[34][37] 2
  • Radlett
  • Elstree & Borehamwood
  • Mill Hill Broadway
  • Hendon
  • Cricklewood
  • West Hampstead Thameslink
  • Kentish Town
  • St Pancras International
  • Farringdon
  • City Thameslink
  • London Blackfriars
  • Elephant & Castle
  • Loughborough Junction
  • Herne Hill
  • Tulse Hill
  • Streatham
  • Mitcham Eastfields
  • Mitcham Junction
  • Hackbridge
  • Carshalton
  • Services then continue to/from St Albans City via Wimbledon (see above)
London Blackfriars to Sevenoaks via Catford and Otford[38] 2

Peak hoursEdit

During peak hours, the 1tph Letchworth Garden City to London King's Cross service (from the table above) is extended to/from Cambridge, with extra calls at Baldock, Ashwell & Morden, Royston, Meldreth, Shepreth and Foxton, thereby creating a 2tph Cambridge to London King's Cross (and return) stopping service during these hours only.[31]

Also during peak hours, the 2tph London Blackfriars to Sevenoaks service (from the table above) is extended through the 'core tunnel' to/from Welwyn Garden City (though a few services originate at Finsbury Park), with extra calls at City Thameslink, Farringdon, St Pancras International, Finsbury Park, New Southgate, Oakleigh Park, New Barnet, Potters Bar and Hatfield.[38][39]

As well as these services, during peak hours, several trains in each direction (approximately 2tph) run to/from Orpington (originating/terminating at either London Blackfriars, Luton, West Hampstead Thameslink or Kentish Town), all calling at Petts Wood in lieu of stations from St Mary Cray to Bat & Ball.[38]

In addition, some very limited services run: In each direction there are 6 trains per day that operate to/from East Grinstead (originating/terminating at either Bedford, West Hampstead Thameslink, St Pancras International or London Bridge)[40] and beginning on the 16th of January, there is 1 service per day that operates to/from Littlehampton (originating/terminating at London Bridge).[41]

Great Northern service patternEdit

Since the introduction of regular services through the Canal Tunnels during May 2018, many GTR services on the East Coast Main Line were rebranded from Great Northern to Thameslink. Most of these services have been extended through central London and incorporated into the Thameslink network (as per above), although as of October 2019 some services are yet to be extended. The only services to retain the Great Northern brand are those on the Northern City Line and the express services to/from Cambridge, Ely and King's Lynn, as well as Peterborough at peak times.[42]

The Great Northern off-peak service pattern, with frequencies in trains per hour (tph), consists of the following:[43][44]

Route tph Calling at
London King's Cross to Ely 1
London King's Cross to King's Lynn 1
Moorgate to Welwyn Garden City 2
Moorgate to Stevenage via Hertford North 2

Southern and Gatwick Express servicesEdit

The Southern and Gatwick Express brands joined Govia Thameslink Railway on 26 July 2015. Southern routes run from London Victoria and London Bridge through the South London suburbs of Battersea, Norbury, Peckham, Sydenham, Crystal Palace, Norwood, Croydon, Streatham, Purley and Sutton to towns surrounding London including Caterham, Epsom and Tadworth. Further afield, Southern also serve Redhill, Tonbridge, Uckfield, East Grinstead, Gatwick Airport, Brighton, Ashford (Kent), Worthing, Hastings, Portsmouth, Eastbourne, Horsham, Southampton, Littlehampton and Bognor Regis. Additionally, Southern run West London route services from Milton Keynes to South Croydon via Watford and Clapham Junction. Since 2008, Southern has operated the Gatwick Express service from London Victoria to Gatwick Airport and Brighton.[45]

Gatwick ExpressEdit

Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaBrighton 2 Gatwick Airport, Haywards Heath[46]

SouthernEdit

Details of each route, including maps and timetables, are on Southern's website (see External links below). As of December 2022, the off-peak Monday-Saturday service pattern, with frequencies in 'trains per hour' (tph), consists of:[47]

Brighton Mainline
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaLittlehampton 2
London Victoria – Eastbourne 1
London Victoria – Ore 1
Arun Valley
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaSouthampton Central via Crawley 1
London Victoria – Portsmouth & Southsea via Crawley 1
  • Clapham Junction, East Croydon, Gatwick Airport, Three Bridges, Crawley, Horsham, Barnham, Chichester, Havant, Fratton
London Victoria – Bognor Regis via Crawley 2
Coastway East
Route tph Calling at
BrightonSeaford 2
Brighton – Hastings 1
Eastbourne – Ashford International 1
  • Three Oaks and Winchelsea are served by alternate trains.
Coastway West
Route tph Calling at
BrightonHove 2 Shuttle service
Brighton – Southampton Central 1
Brighton – Portsmouth Harbour 1
Littlehampton – Portsmouth & Southsea 1
Littlehampton – Bognor Regis 1
  • Ford, Barnham
Barnham – Bognor Regis 1 Shuttle service
Oxted
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaEast Grinstead 1
London BridgeUckfield 1
Redhill
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaReigate 2
Redhill – Tonbridge 1
West London
Route tph Calling at
Watford JunctionEast Croydon 1
Mole Valley line
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaDorking via Carshalton 1
London Victoria – Horsham via Carshalton 1
London Victoria – Epsom Downs via Norbury 2
London Bridge – Epsom 2
  • Norwood Junction, West Croydon, Waddon, Wallington, Carshalton Beeches, Sutton, Cheam, Ewell East
Caterham and Tattenham Corner lines
Route tph Calling at
London Bridge – Caterham 2
  • This route splits/merges at Purley with the route to Tattenham Corner, see below.
London Bridge – Tattenham Corner 2
  • This route splits/merges at Purley with the route to Caterham, see above.
London via Crystal Palace and/or Tulse Hill
Route tph Calling at
London VictoriaWest Croydon via Crystal Palace 2
London Victoria – London Bridge via Crystal Palace 2
London Bridge – East Croydon via Tulse Hill 2
London Bridge – Beckenham Junction via Tulse Hill and Crystal Palace 2
  • South Bermondsey, Queens Road Peckham, Peckham Rye, East Dulwich, North Dulwich, Tulse Hill, West Norwood, Gipsy Hill, Crystal Palace, Birkbeck

Franchise commitmentsEdit

 
An example of widescale upgrade works at Harpenden station including the extension of platforms for 12 carriage trains, a new footbridge with lifts, new waiting rooms, brighter lighting, new ticket gates and automatic passenger information screens

This franchise is different from many other franchises let since the start of railway privatisation in 1996. Under the agreed terms of the franchise, the operator, in this case Govia, gives all revenue to the government, rather than paying set premiums. The Department for Transport will pay Govia, totalling around £8.9 billion over the franchise period of seven years, from the expected revenues of £12.4 billion. From these payments, Govia expects to generate a 3% profit, and the risks on operating costs will be Govia's, while the DfT will profit or lose from fluctuations in revenue.[48]

Prior to the start of the franchise, Govia stated its plans to invest £50 million in all 239 stations that it would manage. The specifics of these plans include:[49]

  • Enhance all 239 stations including improving access, replace electronic information screens and working with local authorities on the redevelopment of St Albans and Luton stations.
  • Increase staffing hours at many stations, with the 100 busiest stations staffed from first to last train, like London Overground stations.
  • Extension of 'the key' smartcard which Southern has been introducing.
  • Provide 104 stations with free Wi-Fi.
  • £1.5 million on station access improvements including increased cycle storage and electrical vehicle charging points.

Govia also stated its intention to bring about the following:[50]

  • Half-hourly King's Lynn to London services
  • Direct Peterborough, Cambridge, Welwyn Garden City and Finsbury Park to Tattenham Corner, Caterham, Horsham services.[51]
  • Increasing Great Northern suburban services to four trains per hour via Enfield Chase and New Barnet
  • Great Northern suburban services to run to Moorgate at weekends and on weekday evenings
  • 50% increase in capacity from Uckfield to London in the peaks.
  • Doubling overnight Thameslink services
  • Sevenoaks Thameslink services to run on Saturdays
  • Working to extend Oyster to Epsom, Gatwick Airport, Luton Airport Parkway, Welwyn Garden City and Hertford North[52]
  • Class 387 Electrostars for King's Lynn express services, releasing Class 317s, 321s and some Class 365s for newly electrified routes elsewhere.[53]
  • Creating an alliance arrangement with Network Rail in 2016, like South West Trains.[54]

Rolling stockEdit

In order to replace the Class 319 trains and to operate the expanded Thameslink network, a fleet of 115 eight- and twelve-car Class 700 trains had been procured during the franchise term of First Capital Connect. These entered service between 2016 and 2019.

As a consequence of the delayed procurement of the Class 700 trains, 29 Class 387 trains had also been ordered for the Thameslink route to release the Class 319 trains to newly electrified routes. Deliveries were completed during 2014 and the trains entered service later that year.[8][55] It was originally planned that once the Class 700s began entering service, the Class 387s would be transferred to Great Western Railway for use on routes in the Thames Valley.[56] However, a change of plans saw GWR order an entirely new fleet of Class 387s, so the Thameslink units were instead cascaded to the Great Northern route following delivery of the Class 700s.[57][58]

In addition to these, GTR ordered 25 new six-car trains to replace 40-year-old Class 313 units,[48] which were being run on the Great Northern suburban services out of Moorgate. During December 2015, Siemens was selected to provide these as a follow-on to the Class 700 order.[59][60] They were designated as the Class 717 in June 2016, and were first introduced in September 2018.[61][62]

Current fleetEdit

Family Class Image Type Top speed Cars Number Routes operated Built
mph km/h
Southern
Bombardier Turbostar

171

  DMU 100 161 2 11 Oxted line (London Bridge - Uckfield)
East Coastway line (Eastbourne - Hastings)
Marshlink line (Hastings - Ashford Int'l)
2003–2004
4 6
 

 

BREL 1972

313

  EMU 75 120 3 18 West Coastway line (Brighton / Littlehampton / Barnham - Hove / West Worthing / Bognor Regis / Portsmouth Harbour / Portsmouth & Southsea)
East Coastway line (Brighton - Lewes)
Seaford branch line (Lewes - Seaford)
1976–1977
 

 

Bombardier Electrostar

377

  EMU 100 160 3 28 Entire Southern network apart from Oxted line (Hurst Green - Uckfield) & Marshlink line (Ore - Ashford Int'l) sections 2001–2005
4 152
5 34 2012–2014
 
 
 
 
 
387/2   EMU 110 177 4 4[63] TBA 2016–2017
 
Gatwick Express
Bombardier Electrostar

387/2

  EMU 110 177 4 18 Gatwick Express services between London Victoria & Gatwick Airport / Brighton 2015–2016
 
Great Northern
Bombardier Electrostar 387/1   EMU 110 177 4 29 Great Northern express services between London King's Cross & Ely / King's Lynn / Peterborough 2014–2015
 
387/2   EMU 110 177 4 1[63] Great Northern semi-fast services between London King's Cross & Ely / Peterborough 2016–2017
 
387/3   EMU 110 177 4 6[63] Great Northern semi-fast services between London King's Cross & Ely / Peterborough 2016
 
Siemens Desiro

717 Desiro City[62]

  EMU 85 137 6 25 Northern City Line services between Moorgate & Welwyn Garden City / Stevenage via Hertford North 2018
 
Thameslink
Siemens Desiro 700/0 & 700/1 Desiro City  
 
EMU 100 161 8 60 All Thameslink services 2015–2018
12 55
 
 

Past fleetEdit

Former units operated by Thameslink, Southern and Great Northern include:

Class Image Type Top speed Carriages Number Built Routes Withdrawn
mph km/h
365 Networker Express   EMU 100 161 4 40 1994-95 Express services between London King's Cross and / Ely / King's Lynn / Peterborough 2018–2021
 
313   EMU 75 121 3 44 1976–1977 Northern City Line 2019
 
319   EMU 100 161 4 86
  • 1987–1988
  • 1990
All Thameslink services 2015–2017
321   EMU 100 161 4 13 1989–1990 Express services between London King's Cross to Peterborough and Cambridge 2016
377 Electrostar   26 2008–2009 Some Thameslink services 2017
455   EMU 75 120 4 46[64] 1982–1984 Metro and commuter services from London Victoria & London Bridge 2022
 
171   DMU 100 161 4 3[65] 2003-2004 Oxted line (London Bridge - Uckfield)
East Coastway line (Eastbourne - Hastings)
Marshlink line (Hastings - Ashford Int'l)
2022

PerformanceEdit

 
Govia and Thameslink passenger numbers 2010–11 to 2018–19 Q4, annual rolling average[66][67]

In February 2015, Thameslink and Great Northern came at the bottom of Which? magazine's Best and worst UK train companies customer survey, scoring a customer satisfaction score of 43%. Thameslink and Great Northern were also scored 2/5 stars in each of the specific categories covered by the survey (including Reliability, Punctuality and Cleanliness of toilets) – which is the worst performance of any UK train operator. In the Which? 2017 survey, Thameslink and Great Northern improved their performance slightly with a rating of 46% also, their position in the table was second to bottom[68](Southern were in bottom place, but had been subject huge disruption due to industrial action).

Passenger numbers on Govia Thameslink Railway (which also includes Southern and Gatwick Express) have risen from 262 million annually in 2010–11 to 327 million annually in 2015–16.[67]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Trains reverse here

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "National Rail Contract awarded to Govia Thameslink Railway". Go Ahead News. Retrieved 25 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b Topham, Gwyn (23 May 2014). "FirstGroup loses Thameslink franchise to Go-Ahead joint venture". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  3. ^ a b McEwan, Fergus (24 July 2015). "Ambitious plans to improve Southern rail network under new franchise". getsurrey.co.uk.
  4. ^ "Consultation on the combined Thameslink, Southern and Great Northern franchise". Department for Transport. 26 September 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  5. ^ "Expanding and improving the rail network". Department for Transport. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  6. ^ "Rail franchising future programme". Department for Transport. 31 January 2013.
  7. ^ "Railway plan puts new focus on passengers". Secretary of State for Transport statement. 26 March 2013.
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  16. ^ "GTR freezes thousands of fares and caps season tickets to rate of inflation". mynewsdesk.com. 4 December 2015.
  17. ^ "Thameslink woes hit Go-Ahead shares". BBC News. 14 June 2016. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  18. ^ Richard, Craig (17 June 2016). "Boss of Epsom's main train operator Govia Thameslink Railway takes home £2.1m paycheck despite "appalling service"". Your Local Guardian. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  19. ^ Watts, Joseph (17 June 2016). "Govia Thameslink Railway boss refuses to defend CEO £2m pay". Evening Standard. London. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
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  28. ^ Powling, Joshua (24 June 2022). "Rail strikes in Sussex: Southern, Thameslink and Southeastern services running on Friday, June 24". getsurrey.co.uk.
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  31. ^ a b c d e "A: King's Lynn, Ely, Cambridge, Peterborough and Stevenage to London, Gatwick Airport, Horsham and Brighton". Thameslink. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
  32. ^ a b "Q: London, Croydon and Gatwick Airport to Haywards Heath and Brighton". timetables.thameslinkrailway.com. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
  33. ^ "P: London, Croydon and Gatwick Airport to Crawley and Horsham". timetables.thameslinkrailway.com. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
  34. ^ a b c d e "C: Bedford, Luton and St Albans to London, Sutton, Medway Towns, Gatwick Airport and the South Coast". timetables.thameslinkrailway.com. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
  35. ^ "O: London and Croydon to Redhill, Reigate, Tonbridge, Gatwick Airport and Three Bridges". timetables.thameslinkrailway.com. Retrieved 6 September 2022.
  36. ^ "F: The Medway Towns, Gravesend, Dartford and Woolwich to London and Luton".
  37. ^ a b "H: Sutton and Wimbledon to London via Streatham and Tulse Hill".
  38. ^ a b c "E: Sevenoaks, Swanley, Orpington, Bromley South and Catford to London".
  39. ^ "B: Stevenage, Hertford North, Enfield Chase, Welwyn Garden City, Hatfield and Potters Bar to London".
  40. ^ "N: London and Croydon to Oxted, East Grinstead and Uckfield".
  41. ^ "S: London, Croydon, Gatwick Airport and Brighton to Hove, Worthing and Littlehampton".
  42. ^ "Train Routes". greatnorthernrail.com. Retrieved 25 July 2022.
  43. ^ Table 24 National Rail timetable, May 2020
  44. ^ Table 25 National Rail timetable, May 2020
  45. ^ "Our History". Gatwick Express. Retrieved 21 February 2010.[permanent dead link]
  46. ^ Table 184 National Rail timetable, May 2020
  47. ^ Table 170 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (via Selhurst)
    Table 171 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (via Gipsy Hill)
    Table 172 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Sutton and Epsom Downs services)
    Table 173 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (via Peckham Rye)
    Table 176 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (West London Line services)
    Table 177 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (via Sydenham)
    Table 180 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Epsom, Dorking and Horsham services)
    Table 181 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Tattenham Corner and Caterham services)
    Table 182 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (via Oxted)
    Table 183 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Redhill services)
    Table 184 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Brighton Main Line services)
    Table 186 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Arundel Line and via Chichester)
    Table 188 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (West Coastway Line via Worthing)
    Table 189 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Lewes and Seaford services)
    Table 190 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Eastbourne and Ore services)
    Table 192 National Rail timetable, May 2022 (Marshlink Line services)
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  49. ^ "Govia awarded TSGN franchise" (Press release). Govia. 23 May 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  50. ^ "TSGN". Govia. Archived from the original on 25 May 2014. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  51. ^ "Proposed Thameslink service pattern" (PDF). Thameslink Programme. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  52. ^ "Easier journeys and better information". Govia. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
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  54. ^ "More reliable and faster services". Govia. Archived from the original on 15 July 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
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  65. ^ "EMR EVOLVES FOR THE FUTURE". Modern Railways, October 2022 page 52.
  66. ^ "Table 1223 - Passenger journeys by operator | ORR Data Portal". dataportal.orr.gov.uk. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  67. ^ a b "Govia Thameslink Railway - Table 2.8". Archived from the original on 1 May 2017. Retrieved 25 April 2021.
  68. ^ "Best train companies overall". Which?. Archived from the original on 3 June 2017.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Govia Thameslink Railway at Wikimedia Commons

Preceded by
First Capital Connect
Thameslink and Great Northern franchise
Operator of Thameslink, Southern
and Great Northern franchise

2014/2015 – 2025
Incumbent
Preceded by
Southern
South Central (incl Gatwick Express) franchise