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The 4th Dáil was elected at the 1923 general election on 27 August 1923 and first met on 19 September when the 2nd Executive Council was appointed. The 4th Dáil lasted 1,382 days.

Government of the 4th Dáil
2nd Executive Council of the Irish Free State
William Thomas Cosgrave.jpg
Date formed19 September 1923
Date dissolved23 June 1927
People and organisations
Head of stateGeorge V
Governor-GeneralTim Healy
Head of governmentW. T. Cosgrave
Deputy head of governmentKevin O'Higgins
Total no. of ministers11 (inc. 4 non-members of the Executive Council)
Member partyCumann na nGaedheal
Status in legislatureMinority Government
Opposition leaderThomas Johnson (Labour Party)
History
Election(s)1923 general election
Legislature term(s)4th Dáil
Predecessor1st Executive Council
Successor3rd Executive Council

Contents

2nd Executive Council of the Irish Free StateEdit

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ "History of Government – Fourth Dáil". Department of the Taoiseach. Retrieved 20 October 2013.
  2. ^ On 6 June 1924 the Ministers and Secretaries Act,1924 came into effect and the title of Minister for Home Affairs was changed to the Minister for Justice.
  3. ^ Richard Mulcahy was forced to resign after criticism by the Executive Council over his handling of the so-called Army Mutiny.
  4. ^ Eoin MacNeill resigned in November 1925 following the report of the Irish Boundary Commission was published in a newspaper. MacNeill had represented the Free State on the commission.
  5. ^ Joseph McGrath resigned from office on 7 March 1924 because of dissatisfaction with government attitude to IRAO army officers.
  6. ^ On 6 June 1924 the Ministers and Secretaries Act 1924 came into effect and the title of Minister for Agriculture was changed to the Minister for Lands and Agriculture.
  7. ^ On 6 June 1924 the Ministers and Secretaries Act 1924 came into effect and the title of Minister for Local Government changed to the Minister for Local Government and Public Health.
  8. ^ On 6 June 1924 the Ministers and Secretaries Act 1924 came into effect and title of Postmaster-General was changed to the Minister for Posts and Telegraphs.