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Gordon Prentice (born 28 January 1951) is a British Labour Party politician, who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Pendle in Lancashire, from 1992 to 2010.

Gordon Prentice
Member of Parliament
for Pendle
In office
9 April 1992 – 12 April 2010
Preceded byJohn Lee
Succeeded byAndrew Stephenson
Personal details
Born (1951-01-28) 28 January 1951 (age 68)
Edinburgh, Scotland
NationalityScottish
Political partyLabour
Spouse(s)Bridget Corr (m. 1975–2000)
Alma materUniversity of Glasgow

Early lifeEdit

He was educated at the independent George Heriot's School in Edinburgh, and the University of Glasgow, where he received an MA in Politics and Economics in 1972, and was president of the union. From 1982 to 1992, he worked for the Labour Party Policy Directorate.

Parliamentary careerEdit

Prentice was first elected at the 1992 General Election, for Pendle. He was one of the few Labour MPs not to endorse Gordon Brown for the 2007 Labour Leadership, instead nominating left winger John McDonnell. On 28 July 2008, he became the second MP, after Graham Stringer, to call for Gordon Brown to resign.[1] He was a member of the Public Administration Committee, during the 2005–10 Parliament.

In May 2010, soon after leaving office, he described the moment he was nearly killed by a sledgehammer wielding man in August 1998.[2] He also announced he wouldn't stand in Pendle in the next election, stating he was now a private citizen.[3]

Personal lifeEdit

He married Bridget Prentice (née Corr), later also an MP, whom he had met while at university, on 20 December 1975. The couple divorced in 2000.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Prentice calls on Gordon Brown to step down". burnleyexpress.net. 28 July 2008. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  2. ^ "Ex-Pendle MP Gordon Prentice: I thought I was going to die". lancashiretelegraph.co.uk. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  3. ^ "Prentice: I won't stand in Pendle at next election". lancashiretelegraph.co.uk. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  4. ^ "BBC NEWS | VOTE 2001 | CANDIDATES". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 27 August 2018.

External linksEdit