Gloria Warren

Gloria Warren (born Gloria Weiman, April 7, 1926) is an American actress, soprano singer, and philanthropist.[2]

Gloria Warren
Gloria Warren.jpg
Gloria Warren in Dangerous Money (1946)
Born
Gloria Weiman[1]

(1926-04-07) April 7, 1926 (age 95)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationFilm actress
Years active1942–1947

Early yearsEdit

Warren was born Gloria Weiman on April 7, 1926, in Wilmington, Delaware. Warren's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Weiman,[3] were from Eastern Europe (her mother was from Budapest, Hungary).[4] Her father was a jeweler.[5] When she changed her last name to Warren, the rest of her family had their last names changed to Warren, too.[6] She started playing the piano at age eight, and was considered a prodigy by the time she was nine years old.[7] She attended Warner Junior High School.[3]

CareerEdit

Warren was discovered around 1940, when a radio producer saw her showcase her musical talent, including singing and dancing.[1] In 1942, she signed a seven-year[5] contract with the film studio Warner Bros..[8] That same year, she appeared in her first motion picture, Always in My Heart, alongside Kay Francis and Walter Huston. The film was written specifically with her in mind and she received praise for her debut.[8][9]

In 1943, Warren starred in Cinderella Swings It opposite Guy Kibbee. She was cast in a smaller role in the 1946 Charlie Chan film Dangerous Money. Her last film was Bells of San Fernando (1947), in which she was top-billed along with Donald Woods. She retired from film acting afterwards. Her singing voice was often compared to that of Deanna Durbin.[10]

Personal lifeEdit

She married businessman Peter Gold in 1946.[11] They had two children together, Melinda Wiltsie and Daniel Gold. They regularly donated to Pitzer College. Peter died on 17 April 2010 at the age of 85.[12]

FilmographyEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Gloria Warren, film starlet, returns home for world premiere". The Sunday Morning Star. January 25, 1942. Retrieved March 6, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Pitzer Receives Grant for Gold Center Renovations". The Student Life. April 14, 2011. Retrieved July 7, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b Waid, H. Warner (July 13, 1940). "Young Singer to Seek Career in Hollywood". The Morning News. Delaware, Wilmington. p. 17. Retrieved August 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)  
  4. ^ "The Beautiful Gloria Warren". Delaware Historical Society Blog. March 7, 2011. Retrieved September 30, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b Martin, Mildred (February 1, 1942). "Movie Mother Is Best Aid for Incipient Star". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. p. 69. Retrieved August 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)  
  6. ^ "They Change Names As Often As They Do Their Costumes". The Baltimore Sun. Maryland, Baltimore. March 8, 1942. p. 50. Retrieved August 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)  
  7. ^ "Nine-year-old girls wins high praise as pianist". The Morning News. May 24, 1935. Retrieved February 2, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ a b "Gloria Warren's role draws critic's praise". The Sunday Morning Star. February 1, 1942. Retrieved March 6, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Always in My Heart". Catholic Herald. July 31, 1942. Retrieved March 6, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Bubbeo, Daniel (2001). The Women of Warner Brothers: The Lives and Careers of 15 Leading Ladies. Mcfarland & Co Inc Pub. p. 97. ISBN 978-0786411375.
  11. ^ "At 15 a Star, at 39 a Homebody". The News Journal. March 9, 1966. p. 13. Retrieved September 30, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Pitzer College Mourns Peter Gold P'74, Former Chair of Pitzer College Board of Trustees". Pitzer College. April 20, 2010. Retrieved July 7, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit