Giuseppe Pella (18 April 1902 – 31 May 1981) was an Italian Christian Democratic politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of Italy from 1953 to 1954. He was also President of the European Parliament from 1954 to 1956 after the death of Alcide De Gasperi.[1] His economic and monetary policies in the ministry of finance based Italian reconstruction solidly on the best liberal traditions of Western capitalism.[2]

Giuseppe Pella
Giuseppe Pella.jpg
31st Prime Minister of Italy
In office
17 August 1953 – 18 January 1954
PresidentLuigi Einaudi
Preceded byAlcide De Gasperi
Succeeded byAmintore Fanfani
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
15 February 1959 – 25 March 1960
Prime MinisterAntonio Segni
Preceded byAmintore Fanfani
Succeeded byAntonio Segni
In office
19 May 1957 – 1 July 1958
Prime MinisterAdone Zoli
Preceded byGaetano Martino
Succeeded byAmintore Fanfani
In office
17 August 1953 – 18 January 1954
Prime MinisterHimself
Preceded byAlcide De Gasperi
Succeeded byAttilio Piccioni
Minister of Treasury
In office
2 February 1952 – 17 August 1953
Prime MinisterAlcide De Gasperi
Preceded byEzio Vanoni
Succeeded bySilvio Gava
In office
23 May 1948 – 26 July 1951
Prime MinisterAlcide De Gasperi
Preceded byGustavo Del Vecchio
Succeeded byEzio Vanoni
President of the European Parliament
In office
29 November 1954 – 27 November 1956
Preceded byAlcide De Gasperi
Succeeded byHans Furler
Personal details
Born(1902-04-18)18 April 1902
Valdengo, Piedmont, Kingdom of Italy
Died31 May 1981(1981-05-31) (aged 79)
Rome, Lazio, Italy
NationalityItalian
Political partyChristian Democracy

BiographyEdit

Giuseppe Pella was born in Valdengo, Piedmont. After graduation in Economy and Commerce, he adhered to the Christian Democracy (DC), in the right wing of the party. His first government position was as under-secretary of Finances in the II and III De Gasperi cabinets. In the IV De Gasperi he was Minister of Finances.

Pella was Minister of Treasure in 1948–1953, gaining the enmity of the Communist and Socialist parties, as well as some DC members due to his liberal and monetarist policies. After the political crisis caused by the failure of the Cheat Law, Pella was appointed Prime Minister in a deliberately provisional government. Pella gained further critics when, by issuing nationalistic declarations, he created strife with Josip Broz Tito regarding the Free Territory of Trieste. Pella resigned on 12 January 1954.

Later he was Minister of Foreign Affairs under Adone Zoli (1957–1958) and Antonio Segni (1959–1960), and Minister of Balance under Amintore Fanfani (1960–1962). Hostile to the alliance between DC and the Socialist Party, he retreated from frontline politics until 1972, when he became minister of Finances in the short-lived government led by Giulio Andreotti.

Pella was Senator until 1976. He died on 31 May 1981 in Rome, at the age of 79.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Harris M. Lentz (2014). Heads of States and Governments Since 1945. Routledge. pp. 440–43.
  2. ^ D. Ivone, "Giuseppe Pella e la politica liberista nella ricostruzione economica del secondo Dopoguerra." Rivista internazionale di storia della banca (1982): vol 24-25 pp 104-20.

Further readingEdit

  • Gilbert, Mark; Robert K. Nilsson (2010). The A to Z of Modern Italy. Scarecrow Press. pp. 340–41.
  • Ivone, D. "Giuseppe Pella e la politica liberista nella ricostruzione economica del secondo Dopoguerra." Rivista internazionale di storia della banca (1982): vol 24-25 pp 104–20.
  • Lentz, Harris M. (2014). Heads of States and Governments Since 1945. Routledge. pp. 440–43.

External linksEdit

Political offices
Preceded by
Luigi Einaudi
Italian Minister of Finance
1947–1948
Succeeded by
Ezio Vanoni
Preceded by
Gustavo Del Vecchio
Italian Minister of Treasury
1948–1951
Succeeded by
Ezio Vanoni
Preceded by
Luigi Einaudi
Italian Minister of Budget
1948–1954
Succeeded by
Ezio Vanoni
Preceded by
Ezio Vanoni
Italian Minister of Treasury
1952–1953
Succeeded by
Silvio Gava
Preceded by
Alcide De Gasperi
President of the Italian Council of Ministers
1953–1954
Succeeded by
Amintore Fanfani
Preceded by
Alcide De Gasperi
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
1953–1954
Succeeded by
Attilio Piccioni
Preceded by
Alcide De Gasperi
Italy
President of the European Parliament
1954–1956
Succeeded by
Hans Furler
West Germany
Preceded by
Gaetano Martino
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
1957–1958
Succeeded by
Amintore Fanfani
Preceded by
Amintore Fanfani
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
1958–1960
Succeeded by
Antonio Segni
Preceded by
Fernando Tambroni
Italian Minister of Budget
1960–1962
Succeeded by
Ugo La Malfa
Italian Chamber of Deputies
Preceded by
None, Parliament re-established
Member of Parliament for Turin
Legislatures: CA, I, II, III, IV

1946–1968
Succeeded by
Title jointly held
Italian Senate
Preceded by
Title jointly held
Italian Senator for Piedmont
Legislatures: V, VI

1968–1976
Succeeded by
Title jointly held