Open main menu

Gisimba Memorial Centre

  (Redirected from Gisimba Orphanage)

Gisimba Memorial Centre is an after-school centre for disadvantaged children in Kigali, Rwanda. Formerly, it was the oldest and best-known orphanage in Rwanda, however, in 2016 the government began closing orphanages and transferring the children under foster care and adoption to families.[1] It was founded by Peter and Dancilla Gisimba in the 1980s.[2] They took orphans into their home from the local community, until there were too many to house, at which point they transferred to a larger location.[3] It was renamed the Gisimba Memorial Centre in 1990.[2]

Gisimba Memorial Centre
FounderPeter and Dancilla Gisimba
Location
  • Kigali, Rwanda
Coordinates1°58′23″S 30°02′57″E / 1.973136°S 30.049185°E / -1.973136; 30.049185Coordinates: 1°58′23″S 30°02′57″E / 1.973136°S 30.049185°E / -1.973136; 30.049185
Director
Damas Gisimba
Websitegisimba.org
Formerly called
Gisimba Orphanage

In the Rwandan genocide of 1994, the Damas and Jean-Francois Gisimba (the founder's sons) along with American aide worker Carl Wilkens help hide and save 400 children, and even more adults, within the orphanage from the Interahamwe, or Hutu militia.[3] On November 21, 2017, the former orphanage officially changed its mission.[4] In a statement to the press, the director said, "We have turned the orphanage to Gisimba after School Initiative – it is a training centre which will bring the youth together for several entertainment and education activities."[4]

MediaEdit

Brandon Stanton, the creator of Humans of New York, visited Rwanda in September 2018.[5] Beginning on October 16, 2018, he began covering the genocide on his site through a series of interviews and photos from persons who were affected.[6] On his site, he stated his objective: "During my week in Rwanda, I focused on the stories of people who took a moral stand during the genocide. These are members of the Hutu majority who risked their lives to shield and protect Tutsis. In Rwanda they are known as ‘The Rescuers.'"[7] In conjunction with the series, he hosted a GoFundMe campaign to benefit the Gisimba Memorial Centre in Rwanda and the planned the yet-to-be-built Gisimba House in Uganda.[8] He supplemented the campaign with $13,000 from HONY's Patreon fund, as well as with $1 for every donation beyond the 5,000th donation.[8][9] The campaign reached its goal of $200,000 in 18 hours,[9][10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bisumba, Nasra (31 August 2018). "Rwanda phasing out orphanages, pushes for local adoptions | DW | 31.08.2016". DW.COM. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b Fallon, Amy (11 July 2014). "Future of Rwanda's Orphans Still Uncertain". Inter Press Service (Press release). Kigali. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b Wynne-Jones, Ros (21 June 2011). "Rwanda heroes: 17 years on". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b Tabaro, Jean de la Croix (20 November 2017). "Gisimba Orphanage Turns into Training Centre". KT PRESS. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  5. ^ Stanton, Brandon (13 September 2019). "Feeling Grateful". Patreon. Archived from the original on 26 October 2018. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  6. ^ Stanton, Brandon (16 October 2018). "Humans of New York". Facebook. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  7. ^ Stanton, Brandon (16 October 2018). "Humans of New York". Humans of New York. Archived from the original on 26 October 2018. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  8. ^ a b Stanton, Brandon (27 October 2018). "Humans of New York". Facebook. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  9. ^ a b Stanton, Brandon (27 October 2018). "Humans of New York". Facebook. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  10. ^ Tabaro, Jean de la Croix (29 October 2018). "American Author Raises $400,000 to Build 'Gisimba House' in Rwanda, Uganda". KT PRESS. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.

External linksEdit