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Ghatotkacha (Sanskrit: घटोत्कच Ghaṭōtkaca "Bald Pot") is an important character in the Mahabharata.[1] His name comes from his head, which was hairless (utkaca) and shaped like a ghatam.[2] Ghatotkacha was the son of the Pandava Bhima and the Rakshasi Hidimbi. His maternal parentage made him half-Rakshasa and gave him many magical powers such as the ability to fly, to increase or decrease his size and to become invisible. He was an important fighter from the pandava side in the Kurukshetra war.

Ghatotkacha
Mahabharata Edit this on Wikidata character
The death of ghatotkacha.jpg
A mughal depiction of Ghatotkacha (top) getting killed by Karna (top left)
Information
Parent(s) Bhima Edit this on Wikidata
Hidimbi Edit this on Wikidata

Contents

MahabharataEdit

 
Bhimsen and Ghatotkacha

Ghatotkacha was born to Hidimbi and the Pandava Bhima. When traveling the countryside with his brothers and mother as a brahmin, having escaped the lakshagraha, Bhima saved Hidimbi from her wicked brother Hidimba. Soon after Ghatotkacha was born, Bhima had to leave his family, as he still had duties to complete at Hastinapura. Ghatotkacha grew up under the care of Hidimbi. One day he received a pearl which he later gave to his cousin Abhimanyu. Like his father Ghatotkacha primarily fought with the mace. Lord Krishna gave him a boon that no one in the world would be able to match his sorcery skills (except Krishna himself).[3] His wife was Ahilawati and his sons were Barbarika, Anjanaparvan and Meghvarna.[citation needed]

Kurukshetra WarEdit

In the Mahābhārata, Ghatotkacha was summoned by Bhima to fight on the Pandava side in the Kurukshetra battle. Invoking his magical powers, he wrought great havoc in the Kaurava army. In particular, after the death of Jayadratha on the fourteenth day of battle, when the battle continued on past sunset, his powers were at their most effective.[citation needed]

At this point in the battle, being badly beaten by Ghatotkacha's attacks, the Kaurava leader Duryodhana appealed to Karna to use his divine weapon called the Vasavi Shakti. The Vasavi Shakti had been granted to Karna by the god Indra, but under the condition that Karna could only use it once. Karna had been saving it for his battle with Arjuna, but realized he had no choice and hurled the weapon at Ghatotkacha. Mortally wounded, Ghatotkacha flew into the air and caused his body to grow to a gigantic size, so when he fell to the ground he crushed one akshauhini of the Kaurava army.[4] After his death Krishna was glad Karna no longer had Vasavi Sakthi to use against Arjuna.[5]

 
Death of Ghatotkacha

In popular cultureEdit


In MediaEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Datta, Amaresh (2006-01-01). "The Encyclopaedia of Indian Literature (Volume Two) (Devraj to Jyoti)". ISBN 978-81-260-1194-0. 
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 10 January 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2006. 
  3. ^ Dutt, Romesh. "Maha-Bharata, The Epic of Ancient Indi". 
  4. ^ Amar Chitra Katha #592, ISBN 9788184821994
  5. ^ www.wisdomlib.org (2015-01-10). "The Death of Ghatotkacha [Chapter 10]". Wisdom Library. Retrieved 2017-03-16. 
  6. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/report/ssg/20080512.htm

External linksEdit