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State Route 29 (SR 29) is a 98.1-mile-long (157.9 km) state highway that travels southeast-to-northwest through portions of Toombs, Montgomery, Treutlen, Laurens, Wilkinson, and Baldwin counties in the central part of the U.S. state of Georgia. The highway connects the Vidalia area with the Milledgeville area, via the Dublin area.

State Route 29 marker

State Route 29
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length98.1 mi[2] (157.9 km)
Existed1919[1]–present
Major junctions
South end US 1 / SR 4 / SR 15 in South Thompson
 
North end US 441 / US 441 Bus. / SR 24 in Milledgeville
Location
CountiesToombs, Montgomery, Treutlen, Laurens, Wilkinson, Baldwin
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
US 29SR 30

SR 29 was originally designated on a path from Jeffersonville to Irwinton and Milledgeville before being shifted to its current path. It was then extended to its southern terminus.

Route descriptionEdit

SR 29 begins at an intersection with US 1/SR 4 in the unincorporated community of South Thompson, which is about 8 miles (13 km) south-southeast of the central part of Vidalia in Toombs County. At its southern terminus, it is concurrent with SR 15, which is concurrent with US 1/SR 4 south of this point. SR 15/SR 29 head northwest and curve to the north-northwest and enter Vidalia. In town, they curve to the northeast and intersect US 280/SR 30. The four highways travel concurrent to the northwest, intersect SR 130, and then curve to the west-southwest. Then, they enter Montgomery County right before leaving town. They travel north of Rocky Creek Golf Club and enter Higgston, where they meet the northern terminus of SR 135. At this intersection, SR 15/SR 29 depart the concurrency to the north-northwest. They meet the western terminus of SR 292 before leaving town. They travel through Tarrytown before entering Treutlen County. In Soperton, they intersect US 221/SR 56 (2nd Street). At this intersection, SR 15 turns to the right, onto US 221/SR 56 north. Two blocks later, they intersect SR 46. After that, SR 29 continues to the northwest and leaves town. It travels through rural areas of town and has an interchange with Interstate 16 (I-16) southeast of Rockledge. Just over 2,000 feet (610 m) later, it crosses over the Mercer Elias Branch into Laurens County. The highway travels through Rockledge and meets the western terminus of SR 86. Then, it enters East Dublin, where it first meets the northern terminus of SR 199 (Coleman Avenue). In the main part of town, it intersects US 80/SR 26 (Savannah Avenue). The three highways begin a concurrency to the northwest. Approximately 500 feet (150 m) later, US 319/SR 31 (Wrightsville Avenue) join the concurrency. They head west-northwest and then curve to the southwest. They cross over the Oconee River on the Herschel Lovett Bridge into Dublin. At Jefferson Street, the concurrency intersects US 441. Here, SR 29 departs the concurrency to the north-northwest, concurrent with US 441. The two highways head to the northwest and meet the northern terminus of US 441 Byp./SR 117. Then, they meet the northern terminus of SR 338 before entering Wilkinson County. In Nicklesville, they intersect SR 112. The two highways begin to curve to the north-northwest and meet the eastern terminus of SR 96. After that, they travel to the west of Bearcamp Lake and enter Irwinton. There, they intersect SR 57 (Main Street). Then, they travel through McIntyre. They have an interchange with SR 540 (Fall Line Freeway) before entering Baldwin County. In Scottsboro is an intersection with SR 243. This intersection also marks the southern terminus of US 441 Bus. US 441/SR 29 act as a bypass of the main part of Milledgeville. At an intersection with SR 49 (West Hancock Street), they enter the city limits of Milledgeville and travel through the western part of the city. Then, they intersect SR 22 (Glynn Street). Next to Hatcher Square Mall they intersect US 441 Bus./SR 24 (North Columbia Street). This intersection marks the northern terminus of both US 441 Bus. and SR 29.[2]

The following segments of SR 29 are included as part of the National Highway System, a system of routes determined to be the most important for the nation's economy, mobility, and defense:

  • From the southern terminus to Soperton[3]
  • From the intersection with US 441 Byp./SR 117 northwest of Dublin to Milledgeville[3]

HistoryEdit

SR 29 was established at least as early as 1919 on a path from Jeffersonville northeast to Irwinton and then north-northwest to Milledgeville. At this time, an unnumbered road was established on the current path of SR 29 from Dublin north-northwest to Irwinton.[1] By the end of September 1921, the portion from Jeffersonville to Irwinton was shifted eastward onto the previously unnumbered road.[1][4]

In January 1932, the highway was extended east-northeast on US 80/SR 15/SR 26 to North Dublin and then southeast to US 1/SR 4 in South Thompson.[5][6] About five years later, the path of SR 29 in the Vidalia area was slightly shifted westward, onto a concurrency with US 280/SR 30 from Vidalia to Higgston.[7][8]

In 1942, the entire length of SR 29 had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] Between January 1945 and November 1946, US 319 was designated on the path of SR 29 from North Dublin and Dublin.[11][12] Between February 1948 and April 1949, US 441 was designated on it from Dublin to Milledgeville.[13][14]

Between July 1957 and June 1960, the path of SR 15 was shifted eastward, off of the North Dublin–Dublin segment, to travel concurrently with SR 29 from South Thompson to Soperton. Its former path, on SR 29, was redesignated as SR 31.[15][16] Between June 1963 and January 1966, US 441/SR 29 was indicated to enter Milledgeville on Wayne Street. SR 29 ended at the intersection with SR 22/SR 24 (Hancock Street). US 441 turned left and continued to the west-southwest on SR 22/SR 24.[17][18]

In 1971, the path of SR 29 in Milledgeville was shifted west a few blocks, off of US 441 (Wayne Street north of Franklin Street) and onto Franklin Street west-southwest to Clarke Street and then north-northwest on Clarke Street to US 441 and the northern terminus of SR 49.[19][20]

In 1985, the path of US 441 in Milledgeville, on Wayne Street north of Franklin Street, and on Hancock Street, was shifted southwestward, onto SR 29 (Franklin and Clarke streets).[21][22] In 1989, the path of US 441/SR 29 in Milledgeville was shifted westward, onto a bypass of the city. The former path of SR 29 was redesignated as US 441 Bus. and a northern extension of SR 243.[23][24]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmi[2]kmDestinationsNotes
ToombsSouth Thompson0.00.0    US 1 / SR 4 / SR 15 southSouthern end of SR 15 concurrency; southern terminus
Vidalia8.513.7   US 280 east / SR 30 east (1st Street)Southern end of US 280 east/SR 30 east concurrency; eastbound lanes of US 280/SR 30 on one-way pairs
8.613.8   US 280 west / SR 30 west (Main Street)Northern end of US 280 east/SR 30 east concurrency; southern end of US 280 west/SR 30 west concurrency; westbound lanes of US 280/SR 30 on one-way pairs
MontgomeryHiggston11.919.2    US 280 west / SR 30 west / SR 135 south – Mount Vernon, UvaldaNorthern end of US 280/SR 30 concurrency; northern terminus of SR 135
13.020.9  SR 292 east – VidaliaWestern terminus of SR 292
TreutlenSoperton26.342.3    US 221 / SR 56 / SR 15 north (2nd Street) – Mount Vernon, Swainsboro, AdrianNorthern end of SR 15 concurrency
26.542.6  SR 46 (Eastman Road / Metter Road) – Eastman, Oak Park
32.952.9  I-16 (SR 404 / Jim Gillis Historic Savannah Parkway) – Macon, SavannahI-16 exit 67
Mercer Elias Branch33.754.2Unnamed bridge over Mercer Elias Branch, marking the Treutlen–Laurens county line
Laurens42.568.4  SR 86 east (Old Savannah Road) – Oak ParkWestern terminus of SR 86
East Dublin46.274.4  SR 199 south (Coleman Avenue) – Mount VernonNorthern terminus of SR 199
46.775.2   US 80 east / SR 26 east (Savannah Avenue) – SwainsboroSouthern end of US 80/SR 26 concurrency
46.875.3   US 319 north / SR 31 north (Wrightsville Avenue) – WrightsvilleSouthern end of US 319/SR 31 concurrency
East DublinDublin line48.177.4Herschel Lovett Bridge over the Oconee River
Dublin   US 319 south / SR 31 south (Washington Street) – McRaeNorthern end of US 319/SR 31 concurrency
48.878.5     US 80 west / SR 19 / SR 26 west / US 441 south – Macon, Cochran, McRaeNorthern end of US 80/SR 26 concurrency; southern end of US 441 concurrency
54.086.9   US 441 Byp. south / SR 117 southNorthern terminus of US 441 Byp./SR 117
56.991.6  SR 338 south – DudleyNorthern terminus of SR 338
WilkinsonNicklesville64.1103.2  SR 112 – Allentown, Toomsboro
69.9112.5  SR 96 west – JeffersonvilleEastern terminus of SR 96
Irwinton75.3121.2  SR 57 (West Main Street) – Macon, Wrightsville
  SR 540 (Fall Line Freeway) – Ivey, Gordon, Augusta, MaconInterchange
BaldwinScottsboro91.2146.8   US 441 Bus. north / SR 29 Bus. north / Gordon Highway SW – MilledgevilleSouthern terminus of US 441 Bus. and SR 29 Bus.; former SR 243
Milledgeville95.2153.2  SR 49 (West Hancock Street) – Macon
97.0156.1    SR 22 / SR 212 west (Glynn Street) – Gray, Macon, Milledgeville, Central Georgia Technical CollegeEastern terminus of SR 212; SR 22 east provides access to Navicent Health Baldwin
98.1157.9     US 441 north / US 441 Bus. south / SR 24 / SR 29 Bus. south (North Columbia Street) / Dunlap Road east – Eatonton, SandersvilleNorthern end of US 441 concurrency; northern terminus of US 441 Bus., SR 29, and SR 29 Bus.; western terminus of Dunlap Road
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routeEdit

Milledgeville business loopEdit

 

State Route 29 Business
LocationScottsboroMilledgeville
Length7.1 mi[25] (11.4 km)
Existed2016[26][27]–present

State Route 29 Business (SR 29 Bus.) is a business route of SR 29 that exists in Scottsboro and Milledgeville. It is entirely concurrent with U.S. Route 441 Business (US 441 Bus.). Most of its path was formerly signed as part of SR 243. SR 29 Bus. was designated in 2016.[26][27]

Milledgeville spur routeEdit

 

State Route 29 Spur
LocationMilledgeville
Existed1946[11][12]–1960[15][16]

State Route 29 Spur (SR 29 Spur) was a spur route of SR 29 that existed in the southern part of Milledgeville. Between January 1945 and November 1946, it was established on the northern part of Vinson Highway, from the southern part of Vinson Highway in the southeastern part of the city north-northwest and northwest to US 441/SR 29 (Wayne Street) in the southern part of the city.[11][12] Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was redesignated as SR 112 Spur. The southern part of Vinson Highway was designated as part of SR 112.[15][16]

The entire route was in Milledgeville, Baldwin County.

mikmDestinationsNotes
Vinson Highway southSouthern terminus
   US 441 / SR 29 (Wayne Street)Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Google (August 22, 2013). "Overview map of SR 29 (Southern terminus to Milledgeville)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 22, 2013.
    Google (August 22, 2013). "Overview map of SR 29 (Milledgeville)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 22, 2013.
  3. ^ a b National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. May 8, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  4. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  5. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  6. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (February 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  7. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1943). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  12. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017. (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017. (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017. (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  15. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017. (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  16. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 30, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved July 1, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  20. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1972). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  21. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1984). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1984–1985 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  22. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–1987 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  23. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1989). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1989–1990 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  24. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1990). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1990–1991 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  25. ^ Google (January 13, 2019). "Overview map of US 441 Bus. (Milledgeville, Georgia)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  26. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2016). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (Centennial ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  27. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2017). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2017–2018 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 1, 2019.

External linksEdit