George Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham

(George Frederick) D'Arcy Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham (5 September 1828 – 27 November 1879), styled Viscount Lambton from 1833 to 1840, was a British peer.


The Earl of Durham
Lord-Lieutenant of County Durham
In office
1854–1879
Preceded byThe Marquess of Londonderry
Succeeded byThe Marquess of Londonderry
Personal details
Born
George Frederick D'Arcy Lambton

(1828-09-05)5 September 1828
Copse Hill, Wimbledon, England
Died27 November 1879(1879-11-27) (aged 51)
Mayfair, London, England
Spouse(s)
Lady Beatrix Frances Hamilton
(
m. 1854; her death 1871)
Children13
ParentsJohn Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham
Lady Louisa Elizabeth
Alma materCambridge University

Early lifeEdit

Lambton was born on 5 September 1828 at Copse Hill, Wimbledon and was baptised at St Mary's Church, Wimbledon on 29 September that year.[1] He was the second (and, later, eldest surviving) son of John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham, and his second wife Lady Louisa Elizabeth.[2] His mother was a daughter of Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey. He was known by his third name of D'Arcy, the maiden name of an ancestor whose inheritance included land surrounding what would later become Lambton Castle. From his father's first marriage to Harriet Cholmondeley (the illegitimate daughter of George Cholmondeley, 1st Marquess of Cholmondeley), his elder half-sister was Lady Frances Charlotte Lambton, who married John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough.[1]

At age 11, Lambton inherited the earldom of Durham when his father, who served as British Ambassador to Russia and Governor-General of Canada, died in 1840. His mother died from a severe cold just over a year later. He attended Cambridge University in 1846.[3]

Public lifeEdit

Lord Durham served as Lord-Lieutenant of County Durham from 1854 to 1879.[3]

On 19 July 1877, the Earl of Durham signed a document giving an acre of his land to be used for the construction of a church in the newly formed parish of Fatfield.Fatfield, St George's church, Washington was completed in 1879 and was built in the Early English Gothic style.

Personal lifeEdit

On 23 May 1854, Lord Durham married Lady Beatrix Frances Hamilton (1835–1871) at St George's, Hanover Square. Lady Beatrix was the second daughter of James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn and Lady Louisa Jane Russell (a daughter of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford. Together, they had thirteen children:[1]

The Countess of Durham died on 21 January 1871, aged 35, and just three days after the birth of her youngest child. In 1876, Lord Durham had his right eye removed after he was shot by his son, Charles, while on a shooting party. Lord Durham died at 6:05pm on 27 November 1879 at his town house on Hill Street in Mayfair, aged 51, and was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest twin son John. The Earl and Countess and some of their children are buried in St Barnabas' Church, Burnmoor, which the Earl had built at his own expense when the parish was created in 1867.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Durham, Earl of (UK, 1833)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  2. ^ Dod, Charles Roger (1844). The Peerage Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland... Whittaker. p. 128. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b Colville, John (1988). Those Lambtons!: A Most Unusual Family. Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 9780340427682. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  4. ^ Dod's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, of Great Britain and Ireland, for ...: Including All the Titled Classes. S. Low, Marston & Company. 1908. p. 1138. Retrieved 29 September 2019.

External linksEdit

Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Marquess of Londonderry
Lord Lieutenant of Durham
1854–1879
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Londonderry
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
John Lambton
Earl of Durham
1840–1879
Succeeded by
John Lambton