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A gentleman farmer is a landowner who has a farm (gentleman's farm) as part of his estate and who farms mainly for pleasure rather than for profit or sustenance.[1][2]

The estate can vary from under ten to hundreds or even thousands of acres, and may produce any number of types of grains, poultry or other livestock. A gentleman farmer can employ labourers and farm managers. The chief source of income for a gentleman farmer was derived not from any income that the landed property may generate. He invariably had his own private income, worked as a professional, owned a large business elsewhere, or some combination of the three.[3][4][5][6]

Some notable gentleman farmers include James Roosevelt I, the father of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt; Dwight D. Eisenhower who retired to a farm near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania after leaving the White House; George Washington, who farmed at Mount Vernon; Winthrop Rockefeller, son of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. who moved to Arkansas in 1953 and established Winrock Farms atop Petit Jean Mountain; Frederick Hinde Zimmerman;[7] Frank C. Rathje; and William Locke Allison, known for Allison Woods, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Definition - "Gentleman Farmer"". Oxford University Press. 2016. Retrieved 25 June 2016. A country gentleman who has a farm as part of his estate.
  2. ^ "Definition - Gentleman farmer". Merriam-Webster, An Encyclopædia Britannica Company. Retrieved 25 June 2016. A man who farms mainly for pleasure rather than for profit
  3. ^ Claudius Loudon, John (1839). "An encyclopædia of agriculture ... Fourth edition, etc - Book I Agricultural Artists (Page 1123)". Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, &Longmans. Retrieved 25 June 2015.
  4. ^ Kames, Lord Henry Home (1776). "The Gentleman Farmer: Being an Attempt to Improve Agriculture by Subjecting it to the Test of Rational Principles". W. Creech. Retrieved 25 June 2015.
  5. ^ Quinn, Tom (1 April 2012). "Life on the Old Farm (Chapter - A Farming Dynasty)". David & Charles. Retrieved 25 June 2016. My father was a gentleman farmer in the sense that he had a private income... he didn't need to worry too much if the farm itself didn't make any money.
  6. ^ "Gentleman farmer". Encarta. Archived from the original on 20 September 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  7. ^ Unsigned (22 September 1924). "Fred Zimmerman Obituary". Daily Republican Register.
  8. ^ National Park Service (9 July 2010). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.