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Gary Cziko is an American researcher, and author[1] in the field of educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign who has worked on the philosophical model known as perceptual control theory (PCT) – a model whose original developer, William T. Powers, was his mentor.[2] He has written two introductory books on the subject, and in 1995 he introduced the concept of "universal selectionism" into the PCT model.[3]

Gary Cziko
Born
Gary A. Cziko
NationalityAmerican
Known forContributions to cognitive and educational psychology
Scientific career
Fields

Education and careerEdit

Cziko received a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Queens College, City University of New York, a Master of Arts degree in psychology from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1975, and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) from McGill University in 1978.[1] He was a post-doctoral research fellow for the Quebec Ministry of Education at the University of Montreal during 1978–79.[1] Since 1979, Cziko has been on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He became an associate professor in 1986 and a full professor in 1998.

Selected publicationsEdit

In 1989, Cziko published one of his first academic papers relating to PCT:

  • Cziko, Gary (1989). "Unpredictability and Indeterminism in Human Behavior: Arguments and Implications for" (PDF). Educational Researcher. 18 (3): 17–25. doi:10.3102/0013189X018003017.

He has also authored two introductions to PCT, both published by MIT Press:

Awards and recognitionsEdit

In 2008, Cziko was a Fulbright Scholar in Chile.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Gary Cziko". Faculty profile page at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.
  2. ^ a b Deacon, Terrence (2001). "Circling Back to an Organism-Centered Behavioral Biology". American Scientist. 89 (1).
  3. ^ Gontier, Nathalie (2002). "Evolutionary Epistemology". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. University of Tennessee at Martin. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  4. ^ Bradie, Michael (1997). "Without miracles: universal selection theory and the second Darwinian revolution". Book Reviews. Philosophical Psychology. 10 (3): 399–401. doi:10.1080/09515089708573229.
  5. ^ Ogden, Dawn (1997). "Review of Gary Cziko, Without Miracles: Universal Selection Theory and the Second Darwinian Revolution". Philosophy in Review. 17 (3): 160–162.
  6. ^ Salthe, Stanley N. (1996). "Without Miracles: Universal Selection Theory and the Second Darwinian Revolution. Gary Cziko". New Biological Books: Reviews and Brief Notices. The Quarterly Review of Biology. 72 (2): 275. doi:10.1086/419392.
  7. ^ Shapiro, Arthur M. (1996). "Seeing everything through Darwin's eyes (review of Without Miracles)". Books. BioScience. 46 (11): 872–873. doi:10.2307/1312973.
  8. ^ Shanks, Niall (2004). "The Things We Do : Using The Lessons of Bernard and Darwin to Understand The What, How, and Why of Our Behavior". Book Reviews. Philosophical Psychology. 17: 2. doi:10.1080/0951508042000239093.
  9. ^ Simonton, Dean Keith (2001). "The Things We Do: Using the Lessons of Bernard and Darwin to Understand the What, How, and Why of Our Behavior. Gary Cziko". New Biological Books: Reviews and Brief Notices. The Quarterly Review of Biology. 76 (2): 268. doi:10.1086/393971.
  10. ^ Larivière, Serge (2001). "The Things We Do: Using the Lessons of Bernard and Darwin to Understand the What, How and Why of Our Behaviour". Book Reviews. Journal of Mammalogy. 82 (3): 882–883. doi:10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082<0883:>2.0.CO;2.
  11. ^ Prusik, Laura (December 6, 2007). "Ten at U. of I. awarded Fulbright Scholar Grants". Illinois News Bureau, University of Illinois.