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Gao Chengyong (Chinese: 高承勇; 10 November 1964 – 3 January 2019)[1] was a Chinese serial killer and rapist. He mutilated the corpses of his victims, leading to his nickname of the "Chinese Jack the Ripper" in Chinese media.[2] He is thought to have killed eleven women between 1988 and 2002.[3]

Gao Chengyong
Born(1964-11-10)10 November 1964
Died3 January 2019(2019-01-03) (aged 54)
Baiyin, Gansu, China
Other names"Chinese Jack the Ripper"
Conviction(s)Murder, Sexual assault, Robbery, Corpse insulting
Criminal penaltyDeath
Details
Victims11
Span of crimes
1988–2002
CountryChina
State(s)Baiyin, Gansu
Baotou, Inner Mongolia
Date apprehended
26 August 2016

Contents

MurdersEdit

Over the course of 14 years, Gao raped, killed and mutilated eleven women: nine in Baiyin, Gansu province, and two in Baotou, Inner Mongolia.[4] All his victims were dressed in red. The youngest victim was eight years old. The first murder is thought to have originated in a grocery store he managed with his wife in Baiyin.[5] He would normally operate in daytime and follow his victims home, where he would strike.[6]

Gao raped his victims sometimes while they were alive and sometimes after having stabbed them to death. He removed the reproductive organs of some women after killing them[7] and cut the hands and breasts off of at least one of his victims.[8]

Arrest and sentencingEdit

Police linked the eleven murders for the first time in 2004 and offered a reward of 200,000 yuan.[9] Gao avoided being arrested until a close relative was taken in for an unrelated, minor offence. During a routine DNA test, a close familial relationship to the serial killer was established. On the basis of this, Gao was arrested at the grocery store where he worked in Baiyin on 26 August 2016.[3][10] According to the Ministry of Public Security, he confessed to the eleven murders.[2] Gao was sentenced to death and stripped of all his assets on 30 March 2018,[11] and was executed on 3 January 2019.[1]

Personal lifeEdit

Gao was married and had two children. He was from Qingcheng Town, Yuzhong County, Lanzhou, Gansu.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "China's 'Jack the Ripper' Gao Chengyong executed for murders". BBC. 3 January 2019. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b "DNA tests lead police to Gansu 'Ripper'". China Daily. 29 August 2016. Archived from the original on 4 April 2018. Retrieved 1 April 2018.
  3. ^ a b Forsythe, Michael (29 August 2016). "Man Thought to Be China's Jack the Ripper Is Arrested". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  4. ^ "白银连环杀人案罪犯高承勇今日被执行死刑-新华网". www.xinhuanet.com. Retrieved 2019-01-06.
  5. ^ Connor, Neil (30 March 2018). "China's 'Jack the Ripper' sentenced to death for 11 grisly murders". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Revealed: the quiet, 'dutiful' son named one of China's most notorious serial killers". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 31 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  7. ^ Yi, Ding (30 August 2016). "Acquaintances of serial killer, Gao Chengyong, baffled with his behavior, children under fire". sino-us.com. Archived from the original on 29 April 2017. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  8. ^ Killalea, Debra (31 August 2016). "Jack the Ripper of China: Wife of accused serial killer 'can't accept' murders". www.news.com.au. Archived from the original on 5 November 2016. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  9. ^ France-Presse, Agence (29 August 2016). "Police snare 'China's Jack the Ripper' after 28-year search for killer – reports". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 31 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  10. ^ "The DNA breakthrough that led to Gansu Ripper's arrest, confession". NewsComAu. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  11. ^ Afp (30 March 2018). "China's 'Jack the Ripper' sentenced to death". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Archived from the original on 31 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.