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Gallatin County is a county in the U.S. state of Montana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 89,513,[1] making it the third-most populous county in Montana. Its county seat is Bozeman,[2] home of Montana State University. The county was founded in 1865.[3]

Gallatin County, Montana
Looking ENE - Gallatin County Courthouse - Bozeman Montana - 2013-070-09.jpg
Gallatin County Courthouse
Seal of Gallatin County, Montana
Seal
Map of Montana highlighting Gallatin County
Location in the U.S. state of Montana
Map of the United States highlighting Montana
Montana's location in the U.S.
Founded 1865
Named for Albert Gallatin
Seat Bozeman
Largest city Bozeman
Area
 • Total 2,632 sq mi (6,817 km2)
 • Land 2,603 sq mi (6,742 km2)
 • Water 29 sq mi (75 km2), 1.1%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 104,502
 • Density 40/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Website www.gallatin.mt.gov

Gallatin County comprises the Bozeman, MT Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The county's prominent physical feature is the Gallatin River, named by Meriwether Lewis in 1805 for Albert Gallatin,[4] U.S. Treasury Secretary from 1801-14. A small part of Yellowstone National Park lies in the county's southeastern portion. The Big Sky Resort is about midway between West Yellowstone and Bozeman, though the ski area lies mostly in neighboring Madison County, Montana. The Gallatin River canyon is accessed by U.S. Highway 191. In the mid-19th century, a portion of Gallatin County was left over after the division of the Dakota Territory into other states. In 1873, the patch was attached to Montana and became part of Gallatin County.[5]

Contents

HistoryEdit

Lost Dakota, is a portion of land that was left over after the division of the Dakota Territory into other states in the late 19th century, was made part of Gallatin County in 1873.[6]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,632 square miles (6,820 km2), of which 2,603 square miles (6,740 km2) is land and 29 square miles (75 km2) (1.1%) is water.[7] The county attained its present boundaries in 1978, when the former Yellowstone National Park (part) county-equivalent was dissolved and apportioned between Gallatin County and Park County. Gallatin County received 99.155 square miles (256.8 km2) of land area and 0.119 square miles (0.3 km2) of water area, whereas Park County received 146.229 square miles (378.7 km2) of land area and 0.608 square miles (1.6 km2) of water area. The geographies transferred are known now as Census Tract 14 in Gallatin County, and as Census Tract 6 in Park County.

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areasEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1870 1,578
1880 3,643 130.9%
1890 6,246 71.5%
1900 9,553 52.9%
1910 14,079 47.4%
1920 15,864 12.7%
1930 16,124 1.6%
1940 18,269 13.3%
1950 21,902 19.9%
1960 26,045 18.9%
1970 32,505 24.8%
1980 42,865 31.9%
1990 50,463 17.7%
2000 67,831 34.4%
2010 89,513 32.0%
Est. 2016 104,502 [8] 16.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2015[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 67,831 people, 26,323 households, and 16,188 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km²). There were 29,489 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was:

1.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.7% were of German, 11.2% Irish, 10.4% English, 9.0% Norwegian and 5.5% American ancestry.

There were 26,323 households out of which 29.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 6.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.50% were non-families. 24.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.00% under the age of 18, 18.50% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 8.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 108.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,120, and the median income for a family was $46,639. Males had a median income of $30,866 versus $21,330 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,074. About 6.30% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.50% of those under age 18 and 5.60% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 89,513 people, 36,550 households, and 21,263 families residing in the county.[14] The population density was 34.4 inhabitants per square mile (13.3/km2). There were 42,289 housing units at an average density of 16.2 per square mile (6.3/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 95.1% white, 1.1% Asian, 0.9% American Indian, 0.3% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 0.7% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.8% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 32.2% were German, 18.1% were Irish, 14.7% were English, 9.4% were Norwegian, and 3.5% were American.[16]

Of the 36,550 households, 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 41.8% were non-families, and 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.90. The median age was 32.5 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,136 and the median income for a family was $65,029. Males had a median income of $42,245 versus $31,349 for females. The per capita income for the county was $27,423. About 7.4% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Government and PoliticsEdit

Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 44.2% 23,802 45.1% 24,246 10.7% 5,771
2012 50.8% 24,358 45.8% 21,961 3.3% 1,589
2008 46.8% 22,578 50.1% 24,205 3.1% 1,489
2004 56.2% 22,392 41.2% 16,405 2.6% 1,045
2000 58.8% 18,833 31.2% 10,009 10.0% 3,198
1996 50.1% 14,559 37.7% 10,972 12.2% 3,547
1992 38.6% 11,109 33.1% 9,535 28.3% 8,135
1988 56.9% 13,214 41.1% 9,527 2.0% 464
1984 64.8% 15,643 33.8% 8,163 1.4% 334
1980 58.6% 12,738 26.5% 5,747 14.9% 3,241
1976 63.4% 11,062 35.6% 6,215 1.1% 183
1972 66.3% 10,663 31.7% 5,096 2.1% 329
1968 62.1% 7,433 31.9% 3,818 6.1% 727
1964 50.0% 5,621 49.8% 5,600 0.2% 27
1960 64.5% 6,870 35.3% 3,761 0.2% 21
1956 67.2% 6,680 32.8% 3,260 0.0% 0
1952 71.9% 6,998 27.7% 2,697 0.4% 34
1948 53.1% 4,220 44.6% 3,548 2.3% 182
1944 47.0% 3,120 52.5% 3,479 0.5% 33
1940 41.8% 3,430 57.6% 4,718 0.6% 50
1936 30.0% 2,151 65.5% 4,697 4.5% 320
1932 36.0% 2,553 61.4% 4,359 2.6% 183
1928 61.1% 3,861 38.4% 2,423 0.5% 34
1924 44.4% 2,494 27.8% 1,564 27.8% 1,565
1920 54.7% 3,238 40.0% 2,370 5.3% 312
1916 40.1% 2,527 58.1% 3,661 1.9% 118
1912 21.1% 683 43.4% 1,407 35.5% 1,151
1908 47.2% 1,519 46.1% 1,485 6.7% 215
1904 55.8% 1,700 37.1% 1,130 7.2% 218

Gallatin County has traditionally favored Republican presidential candidates, often by large margins. Recent changes to Gallatin County's demographic profile (including immigration from Democratic-leaning areas,[19] and younger voters adopting more liberal political positions)[20] have made the county more competitive.

Democratic candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton narrowly won Gallatin County in 2008 and 2016 respectively, with Republican Mitt Romney winning in 2012.

CommunitiesEdit

Notable residentsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 15, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Montana Place Names Companion". Montana Place Names From Alzada to Zortman. Montana Historical Society Research Center. Retrieved December 1, 2014. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 133. 
  5. ^ Beyond 50: American States That Might Have Been : NPR
  6. ^ Beyond 50: American States That Might Have Been. NPR. Retrieved June 22, 2013.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 28, 2014. 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-10. 
  18. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  19. ^ https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/presidential-geography-montana/
  20. ^ http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/03/20/a-wider-partisan-and-ideological-gap-between-younger-older-generations/

External linksEdit