Galaktoboureko

Galaktoboureko (Greek: γαλακτομπούρεκο, Turkish: Laz böreği, Arabic: شعيبيات‎, Laz: Paponi) is a Greek, Turkish, and Syrian dessert[1][2] of semolina custard baked in filo.[4] Turkish Laz böreği is made with a type of pudding called muhallebi instead of semolina custard. It is popular in Rize and Artvin provinces in the Black Sea Region, home of many Laz people.[1][2]

Galaktoboureko
Three pieces of galaktoboureko
Three pieces of galaktoboureko
TypePastry
Region or stateGreece, Turkey, Syria[1][2]
Main ingredientsPhyllo, semolina custard[3]

PreparationEdit

It may be made in a pan, with filo layered on top and underneath and cut into square portions, or rolled into individual servings (often approximately 10 cm (4 in) long). It is served or coated with a clear, sweet syrup. The custard may be flavored with lemon, orange, or rose. Unlike mille-feuille, which it otherwise resembles, the custard is baked with the pastry,[5] not added afterwards.

Laz böreğiEdit

 
Laz böreği

Turkish Laz böreği is made with a variation of the pudding called muhallebi with the inclusion of cornmeal and ground black pepper, instead of semolina custard. It is popular in Rize and Artvin provinces in the Black Sea Region, home of many Laz people.[1][2] Its ingredients are thin filo dough, butter, muhallebi, black pepper and simple syrup. Today, it's possible to eat Laz böreği at some restaurants in big cities which serve traditional dishes from the Black Sea region.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Timothy G. Roufs; Kathleen Smyth Roufs (29 July 2014). Sweet Treats around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. ABC-CLIO. p. 341. ISBN 978-1-61069-221-2.
  2. ^ a b c d Özhan Öztürk (2005). Karadeniz: ansiklopedik sözlük. Heyamola Yayınları. ISBN 978-975-6121-00-9.
  3. ^ "Galaktoboureko". Allrecipes.com. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Semolina custard pastry with syrup (galaktoboureko)". SBS Food. Special Broadcasting Service. May 2014. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Galaktoboureko". Food.com. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  6. ^ "A Cozy Cafe Serving Black Sea Specialties in Istanbul". Culinary Backstreets. October 22, 2012.

External linksEdit