G.W. Rogers

G.W. Rogers was a tugboat active on the Great Lakes.

Tugboat G.W. Rogers moored in Toronto in 1976.
Tugboat G.W. Rogers moored in Toronto in 1976.
History
Canada
Name: G.W. Rogers
Owner: Canadian Dredging Company
Builder: Great Yarmouth, England
Launched: 1919
Out of service: December 1987
Homeport: Midland, Ontario
Identification:
Fate: Sank at her moorings, December 1987
General characteristics [1]
Class and type: Steam Tug
Tonnage: 164 GT
Length: 88 ft 5 in (26.95 m)
Beam: 21 ft 2 in (6.45 m)
Draft: 10 ft 6 in (3.20 m)
Installed power: 35 hp (26 kW)
The G.W. Rogers, and three other tugs, The tugs William Rest, Lac Como, and the Bagotville tried to free the lake freighter George M. Carl, when she beached off the Humber River in October 1975.

She was built in 1919, at Great Yarmouth, in the United Kingdom.[1] Her previous names included: Ballen Balloch, West Hope and Ocean Gull.

She helped free the lake freighter George M. Carl, when she ran aground off the mouth of the Humber River, in 1975.[2]

The G.W. Rogers sank at her moorings at Rensselaer, New York in December 1987.[3] A port official told the Schenectady Gazette that the vessel was so rusty her name was "nearly illegible". The Schenectady Gazette reported that a floating crane would have to be brought from New York City to salvage the tug, as the combined weight of the vessel and a land-based crane would overwhelm the moorings.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Steam screw G.W. ROGERS". Maritime History of the Great Lakes. Archived from the original on 11 December 2012.
  2. ^ "Tugs Lac Como, William Rest, G.W. Rogers and Bagotvilee tried to free George M. Carl". Maritime History of the Great Lakes. 27 December 1975. Archived from the original on 11 December 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2012.
  3. ^ Brian Nearing (9 December 1987). "Floating Crane needed to raise Tug". Schenectady Gazette. p. 13. Retrieved 11 December 2012.