Fukui (city)

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Fukui (福井市, Fukui-shi) is the capital city of Fukui Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 July 2018, the city had an estimated population of 264,217, and a population density of 69.2 persons per km2, in 102,935 households.[1] Its total area is 536.41 square kilometres (207.11 sq mi). Most of the population lives in a small central area; the city limits include rural plains, mountainous areas, and suburban sprawl along the Route 8 bypass.

Fukui
福井市
From top left: Ichijōdani Asakura Family Historic Ruins, Kitanosho Castle, Fukui Castle and Fukui Prefectural Government, Cherry trees along the Asuwa River, Echizen-Kaga Kaigan Quasi-National Park
From top left: Ichijōdani Asakura Family Historic Ruins, Kitanosho Castle, Fukui Castle and Fukui Prefectural Government, Cherry trees along the Asuwa River, Echizen-Kaga Kaigan Quasi-National Park
Flag of Fukui
Official seal of Fukui
Location of Fukui in Fukui Prefecture
Location of Fukui in Fukui Prefecture
Fukui is located in Japan
Fukui
Fukui
 
Coordinates: 36°3′50.6″N 136°13′10.5″E / 36.064056°N 136.219583°E / 36.064056; 136.219583Coordinates: 36°3′50.6″N 136°13′10.5″E / 36.064056°N 136.219583°E / 36.064056; 136.219583
CountryJapan
RegionChūbu (Hokuriku)
PrefectureFukui
Government
 • - MayorShin'ichi Higashimura
Area
 • Total536.41 km2 (207.11 sq mi)
Population
 (July 1, 2017)
 • Total264,217
 • Density490/km2 (1,300/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
City symbols 
-TreePine
-FlowerHydrangea
Phone number0776-20-5111
Address3-10-1 Ōte, Fukui-shi, Fukui-ken 910-8511
Websitewww.city.fukui.lg.jp

HistoryEdit

OriginsEdit

Fukui was part of ancient Echizen Province.

Sengoku PeriodEdit

In 1471, Asakura had displaced the Shiba clan as the shugo military commander of Echizen Province.[2] The same year, Asakura Toshikage (1428–1481) fortified the Ichijōdani by constructing hilltop fortifications on the surrounding mountains and constructing walls and gates to seal off the northern and southern end of the valley. Within this area, he contracted a fortified mansion, surrounded by the homes of his relatives and retainers, and eventually by the residences of merchants and artisans, and Buddhist temples. He offered refuge to people of culture or skills from Kyoto attempting to escape the conflict of the Ōnin War, and the Ichijōdani became a major cultural, military, and population center, and by the time of Asakura Takakage (1493–1548) it had a peak population of over 10,000 inhabitants. Yoshikage succeeded his father as head of the Asakura clan and castle lord of Ichijōdani Castle in 1548.[3][4]

The Asakura maintained good relations with the Ashikaga shogunate, and thus eventually came into conflict with Oda Nobunaga. Following Nobunaga's capture of Kyoto, Shōgun Ashikaga Yoshiaki appointed Asakura Yoshikage as regent and requested aid in driving Nobunaga out of the capital.[5] As a result, Nobunaga launched an invasion of Echizen Province. Due to Yoshikage's lack of military skill, Nobunaga's forces were successful at the Siege of Kanegasaki and subsequent Battle of Anegawa in 1570, leaving the entire Asakura Domain open to invasion.[2][6][7]

Ichijōdani was razed to the ground by Nobunaga during the 1573 Siege of Ichijōdani Castle.[8]

Kitanosho Castle is known, though that it was built by Shibata Katsuie in 1575. Also, it appears that the tenshu (keep) was nine stories high, making it the largest of the time.

Edo PeriodEdit

Castle town and centre of Fukui Domain during the Edo period Tokugawa shogunate. Fukui Domain played a key role in the Meiji restoration. The modern city of Fukui was founded with the creation of the modern municipalities system on April 1, 1889.

Meiji & Taisho PeriodEdit

During the pre-war period, Fukui grew to become an important industrial and railroad centre. Factories in the area produced aircraft parts, electrical equipment, machine motors, various metal products and textiles.

Fukui was largely destroyed on June 19, 1945 during the Bombing of Fukui during World War II. Of the city's 1.9 Sq. Miles at the time, 84.8% of Fukui was destroyed, per the United States Army Air Forces's Strategic Bombing Survey (Pacific War)

Modern FukuiEdit

Fukui was again devastated by a major earthquake in 1948.

On February 1, 2006, the town of Miyama (from Asuwa District), the town of Shimizu, and the village of Koshino (both from Nyū District) were merged into Fukui.

Fukui's city status was designated a core city on April 1, 2019.[9]

GeographyEdit

Fukui is located in the coastal plain in north-central part of the prefecture. It is bordered by the Sea of Japan to the west and the Ryōhaku Mountains to the east. The Kuzuryū River flows through the city.

ClimateEdit

Fukui has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa) with hot, humid summers and cool winters. Precipitation is high throughout the year, and is especially heavy in December and January.

Climate data for Fukui (1991−2020 normals, extremes 1897−present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 19.9
(67.8)
21.8
(71.2)
26.2
(79.2)
32.0
(89.6)
34.5
(94.1)
36.4
(97.5)
38.6
(101.5)
38.5
(101.3)
37.7
(99.9)
32.3
(90.1)
27.5
(81.5)
24.6
(76.3)
38.6
(101.5)
Average high °C (°F) 6.7
(44.1)
7.8
(46.0)
12.2
(54.0)
18.3
(64.9)
23.3
(73.9)
26.5
(79.7)
30.4
(86.7)
32.2
(90.0)
27.7
(81.9)
22.1
(71.8)
16.0
(60.8)
9.8
(49.6)
19.4
(66.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 3.2
(37.8)
3.7
(38.7)
7.2
(45.0)
12.8
(55.0)
18.1
(64.6)
22.0
(71.6)
26.1
(79.0)
27.4
(81.3)
23.1
(73.6)
17.1
(62.8)
11.3
(52.3)
5.9
(42.6)
14.8
(58.6)
Average low °C (°F) 0.5
(32.9)
0.3
(32.5)
2.8
(37.0)
7.8
(46.0)
13.4
(56.1)
18.2
(64.8)
22.7
(72.9)
23.7
(74.7)
19.4
(66.9)
13.1
(55.6)
7.3
(45.1)
2.7
(36.9)
11.0
(51.8)
Record low °C (°F) −15.1
(4.8)
−14.3
(6.3)
−9.9
(14.2)
−2.6
(27.3)
1.3
(34.3)
7.3
(45.1)
12.8
(55.0)
13.4
(56.1)
7.7
(45.9)
0.5
(32.9)
−1.5
(29.3)
−11.2
(11.8)
−15.1
(4.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 284.9
(11.22)
167.7
(6.60)
160.7
(6.33)
137.2
(5.40)
139.1
(5.48)
152.8
(6.02)
239.8
(9.44)
150.7
(5.93)
212.9
(8.38)
153.8
(6.06)
196.1
(7.72)
304.0
(11.97)
2,299.6
(90.54)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 85
(33)
58
(23)
14
(5.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
31
(12)
186
(73)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.5 mm) 24.3 20.0 17.4 13.3 12.0 11.9 13.5 9.9 12.4 13.4 17.5 23.5 189.2
Average relative humidity (%) 82 78 71 68 68 74 76 73 76 76 78 81 75
Mean monthly sunshine hours 65.4 88.4 136.3 172.3 191.1 146.8 155.4 205.7 151.2 154.4 114.4 72.2 1,653.7
Source: Japan Meteorological Agency[10]

CityscapeEdit

DemographicsEdit

Per Japanese census data, the population of Fukui has remained relatively steady over the past 40 years.

Census data
YearPop.±%
1873 39,784—    
1970 231,901+482.9%
1980 259,638+12.0%
1990 270,911+4.3%
2000 269,557−0.5%
2010 266,796−1.0%
Source: Fukui population statistics, Japanese Imperial Commission [1] (1873)

Neighbouring municipalitiesEdit

Fukui Prefecture

GovernmentEdit

 
Fukui City Hall

Fukui has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 32 members. The city also contributes 12 members to the Fukui Prefectural Assembly. In terms of national politics, Fukui forms part of Fukui 1st district, a single-member constituency of the House of Representatives in the national Diet of Japan.

EconomyEdit

The economy of Fukui is mixed. The city is a regional commercial and finance centre; however, manufacturing, agriculture and commercial fishing also are contributors to the local economy.

Primary sector of the economyEdit

 
Fukui Prefecture Agricultural Cooperatives
 
Fisheries Cooperative Association of FukuiCity

AgricultureEdit

Japan Agricultural Cooperatives(JA)
  • Fukui Prefecture Agricultural Cooperatives(JA FukuiPrefecture)

Fishing industryEdit

Japan Fisheries cooperative(JF)
  • FukuiCity Fisheries cooperative(JF FukuiCity)

Secondary sector of industryEdit

Manufacturing industryEdit

Fukui is home to several companies, including:

Tertiary sector of industryEdit

Service industryEdit

EducationEdit

Universities and collegesEdit

Secondary schoolsEdit

  • Fujishima Senior High School
  • Koshi Senior High School
  • Fukui Commercial Senior High School
  • Usui Senior High School
  • Asuwa Senior High School
  • Michimori Senior High School
  • Kagaku-Gijutsu Senior High School
  • Fukui Norin Senior High School
  • Hokuriku Senior High School
  • Fukui University of Technology - Fukui Senior High School
  • Jin-ai Girl's Senior High School
  • Keishin Senior High School
  • Fukui Minami Senior High School

Other schoolsEdit

TransportEdit

 
Fukui-kita IC
Hokuriku Expressway
 
Port of Takasu

RailwayEdit

 West Japan Railway Company (JR West)
  Fukui Railway
  Echizen Railway

RoadsEdit

HighwayEdit

Japan National RouteEdit

Sea PortEdit

  • Port of Takasu

Visitor attractionsEdit

CultureEdit

SportsEdit

BaseballEdit

HandballEdit

  • Hokuriku Electric Power Company Blue Thunder(JHL

SoccerEdit

Twin towns – sister citiesEdit

Fukui is twinned with:[14]

Friendship citiesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Official home page
  2. ^ a b "Asakura Yoshikage". Encyclopedia of Japan. Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  3. ^ "朝倉 義景" [Asakura Yoshikage]. Nihon Jinmei Daijiten (日本人名大辞典) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  4. ^ "朝倉 義景" [Asakura Yoshikage]. Nihon Kokugo Daijiten (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  5. ^ "朝倉 義景" [Asakura Yoshikage]. Kokushi Daijiten (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 683276033. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  6. ^ "朝倉義景" [Asakura Yoshikage]. Dijitaru Daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  7. ^ Turnbull, Stephen (1987). Battles of the Samurai. Arms and Armour Press. p. 60. ISBN 978-0853688266.
  8. ^ "Ichijodani Asakura Family Site Museum". Retrieved 2017-10-10.
  9. ^ "平成31年4月 中核市『福井市』誕生!". Official website of Fukui. April 1, 2019. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  10. ^ 気象庁 / 平年値(年・月ごとの値). Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  11. ^ "Company Profile". Matsuura Machinery. Retrieved on May 7, 2019.
  12. ^ "Corporate Profile Archived 2017-12-09 at the Wayback Machine." Kumagai Gumi. Retrieved on August 31, 2017."
  13. ^ "Archived copy". www.hks35.ac.jp. Archived from the original on 21 November 2003. Retrieved 11 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "市政情報". city.fukui.lg.jp (in Japanese). Fukui. Retrieved 2020-04-11.

External linksEdit