Fujifilm X series

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The Fujifilm X series is a line of digital cameras produced by Fujifilm. The series encompasses fixed lens and interchangeable lens mirrorless cameras and premium compact point-and-shoot cameras aimed at consumer, enthusiast and professional photographers.[1] The X series is part of the larger FinePix range of digital cameras from Fujifilm.

Fujifilm XF1, X-E1 and X10

The X series models use either APS-C or ⅔ inch sensors. The common thread that unites and defines the series is cutting edge technology combined with traditional (even retro) styling.[2]

Fujifilm X series logo

X series model linesEdit

Since its introduction with the X100 in 2011, the X series has grown to encompass a wide variety of designs. These lines can be broken out into the following categories or model lines.

APS-C sensorEdit

The following lines are united by their use of APS-C-sized sensors measuring 25.1×16.7 mm, with an aspect ratio of 3:2 and Ø31.15 mm field diameter. They are listed here within each category in the order in which the initial model of each type was introduced.

Fixed lensEdit

  • X100 line — These models have a fixed focal length 23mm prime lens and a hybrid electronic/ optical viewfinder in a traditional rangefinder body style. The line originated with the Fujifilm FinePix X100 released in March 2011.[3] The X100 has an EXR CMOS sensor while the subsequent models use proprietary X-Trans sensors.[4] As of 2021, the X100 line includes five models.[5]
  • X/ XF line (APS-C) — The X70, which debuted in early 2016, is similar to the X100 line in that it has a fixed prime lens and an X-Trans APS-C sensor. Differences include lack of a viewfinder, a wider angle lens, and a tilting screen.[6] The X70's successor, the XF10 is similar, but relies on a Bayer sensor.[7] As of 2021, these are the only two models in this lineage.

Interchangeable lensEdit

  • X-Pro line — The X-Pro series are essentially an X100 adapted to utilize interchangeable lenses. Like the X100 they have a hybrid electronic/ optical viewfinder. The first X-Trans sensor was introduced in the X-Pro1, which debuted in March 2012.[8] Three X-Pro models have been produced as of 2021.[9]
  • X-E line — The X-E models offer an interchangeable lens mount, rangefinder styling, X-Trans sensors and electronic viewfinders in a more compact package than the X-Pro line.[10] As of 2021, five X-E cameras have been produced.[11]
  • X-M line — The X-M1, released in 2013, is the sole X-M model. This camera is basically an X-E minus the viewfinder, forcing the user to compose shots using the LCD display. Due to this design, the X-M1 is the smallest camera in the X series which uses interchangeable lenses and has an X-Trans sensor.[12]
  • X-A line – Like the X-M1 the X-A line eschews a viewfinder. The initial X-A model, the Fujifilm X-A1 which was introduced in 2013, is visually nearly identical to the X-M1, but has a different sensor. The X-A series use sensors equipped with a Bayer filter which uses a different pattern of color capturing pixels than the X-Trans filter used on the higher end X series cameras.[13] The line has since expanded to include seven models as of 2021.[14]
  • X-T line — The X-T models represent the X series' first move away from the rangefinder styling after the earlier small-sensor X-S1. They adopt a DSLR-style layout with the electronic viewfinder situated above the lens mount and a more pronounced grip. The X-T models feature the same X-Trans sensors as the rest of the series besides the X-A line. The line debuted with the Fujifilm X-T1 in 2014[15] and has since expanded to include ten models. The X-T models can be further split into three sub-lines, with the single-digit models — X-T1, X-T2, etc. — targeted at professionals with features like weather sealing, the two-digit models — X-T10, etc. — aimed at advanced amateurs,[16] and the three-digit models — X-T100, etc. — catering to budget-minded consumers and using Bayer rather than X-Trans sensors.[17]
  • X-H line — As of 2021, the X-H1 stands alone in this niche, offering a larger DSLR-style body than the X-T line along with a more aggressive grip and advanced features like sensor-shift image stabilization. Like the X-T line, the X-H1 relies on an X-Trans sensor.[18]
  • X-S line (APS-C) — The X-S designation, which previously had been used for a small-sensor bridge camera, the X-S1, was revived with the X-S10 in October 2020. This new X-S camera is a DSLR-style offering which slots between the X-T3 and the X-T30 and features in-body image stabilization. It is differentiated from the X-T line in using a PASM-style command dial rather than the individual dials to set shutter speed and ISO used by many of the other X series lines.[19]

Small sensorEdit

The following lines are united by their use of ⅔ inch sensors measuring 8.8 by 6.6mm, with an aspect ratio of 4:3. In addition to a shared sensor size, all of these model lines utilized fixed (non-interchangeable) zoom lenses. They are listed here in the order in which the initial model of each type was introduced.

  • X line (small sensor) — The X10 was the first model in this line when it debuted in late 2011. Models in this line feature a fixed zoom lens and a rangefinder-style body with an optical tunnel viewfinder.[20] There have been three such models as of 2021.[21]
  • X-S line (small sensor) — The X-S1 is the sole model in this category. It is a DSLR-styled, super-zoom, bridge camera with a fixed lens.[22]
  • XF line (small sensor) — The XF1 was released in September 2012. It is a compact, fixed lens zoom with no viewfinder and an EXR sensor.[23] As of 2021, it has no direct successor, although the XQ line is very similar.
  • XQ line — The XQ line are compact cameras with fixed zoom lenses, X-Trans sensors and no viewfinders. The initial model, the XQ1, came out in October 2013.[24] The XQ2 is the only other model in the line to date.[25]

X series chronologyEdit

Sensor
size
Lens
Type
2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
APS-C Fixed FinePix X100 FinePix X100S FinePix X100T FinePix X100F FinePix X100V
X70 XF10
MILC X-Pro1 X-Pro2 X-Pro3
X-H1
X-T4
X-T1 X-T2 X-T3
X-S10
X-T10 X-T20 X-T30 X-T30 II
X-E1 X-E2 X-E2s X-E3 X-E4
X-M1
X-T100 X-T200
X-A1 X-A2 X-A3 X-A5 X-A7
X-A10 X-A20
⅔" Fixed X10 X20 X30
X-S1
XQ1 XQ2
XF1

Image processor: Bayer | EXR | X-Trans | X-Trans II | X-Trans III | X-Trans IV


X series modelsEdit

Cameras and camera bodies released by Fujifilm as a part of the X series, in chronological order:

  • Fujifilm FinePix X100: Prime lens compact digital camera with custom APS-C sized CMOS sensor and hybrid viewfinder, and fixed 23 mm f/2.0 Fujinon lens. Announced at Photokina, the X100 launched globally in March 2011.[26][27][3]
  • Fujifilm X10: Advanced compact with a 23 inch (17 mm) 12 megapixel (MP), and a high-definition f/2.0 wide-angle and f/2.8 telephoto Fujinon 4x manual zoom lens (28–112 mm). Introduced Fujifilm's EXR-CMOS sensor, a variation on the Bayer filter pattern. Announced September 1, 2011.[28][29][20] Succeeded by Fujifilm X20.
  • Fujifilm X-S1: Advanced enthusiast's camera with the same 23 inch (17 mm) 12 MP EXR-CMOS sensor as the X10 compact. It has a fixed 26X zoom providing range equivalent to 24–624 mm at f/2.8-5.6 aperture. Announced November 24, 2011.[30][31][22]
  • Fujifilm X-Pro1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera that uses the "X-Trans CMOS" sensor and the Fujifilm X-mount system of lenses. It was announced on January 10, 2012, and launched in March 2012.[32][33][8]
  • Fujifilm X-E1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera which is a slimmed-down version of X-Pro1. The modifications include replacing the expensive hybrid viewfinder with an upgraded electronic viewfinder; the new EVF uses a 2.36M dot OLED unit, out-speccing the X-Pro1's 1.44M dot LCD finder.[10] It was announced on September 6, 2012.[34][35]
  • Fujifilm XF1: Enthusiast's compact camera with ⅔ inch EXR-CMOS sensor and Fujinon f/1.8 lens with a 4× optical zoom (25 mm–100 mm equivalent). It was announced on September 17, 2012.[36][37][23]
  • Fujifilm X20: Replacement for the X10 enthusiast compact camera with ⅔ inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor, EXR Processor II and a new advanced optical viewfinder. It was announced on January 7, 2013.[38][39] Succeeded by Fujifilm X30.
  • Fujifilm X100S: Redesigned version of the X100 with new sensor-based phase detection. It was announced January 7, 2013.[40][41] Introduced Fujifilm's Digital Split Image technology, allowing manual focus that appears to the user similar to a rangefinder camera's coincidence or split-image function.[42][4]
  • Fujifilm X-M1: Announced June 25, 2013.[43] It is the smallest X series model with an APS-C X-Trans sensor and an articulating screen.[44][12]
  • Fujifilm X-A1: Lowest priced interchangeable lens camera in the line-up, without X-Trans sensor, announced on September 17, 2013.[45][46][13]
  • Fujifilm X-E2: Successor to the X-E1, with an X-Trans CMOS II sensor (same as the X100S), larger 3 in (76 mm) screen with higher resolution (1.04 M), Digital Split Image technology, and wi-fi. Announced on October 18, 2013.[47][48]
  • Fujifilm XQ1: Premium compact camera with X-Trans CMOS II sensor. Announced on October 18, 2013.[49][50][24]
  • Fujifilm X-T1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera with a weather-sealed body, X-Trans CMOS II sensor, and tilting LCD screen. Announced on January 27, 2014.[51] Also the first X-series camera with an optional battery grip, and the first camera from any manufacturer to fully support UHS-II SD cards.[52][15]
  • Fujifilm X30: Successor to the X20. Announced August 26, 2014.[53][21]
  • Fujifilm X100T: Successor to the X100S. Announced September 10, 2014.[54]
  • Fujifilm X-A2: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera. Successor to the X-A1. Announced January 15, 2015.[55]
  • Fujifilm XQ2: Successor to the XQ1.[56][25]
  • Fujifilm X-T10: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera. Mass market version of X-T1.[57][16]
  • Fujifilm X-T1 IR: A full-spectrum version of the X-T1 useful for capturing infrared photographs.[58] It was developed and marketed specifically for law enforcement (forensic) as well as medical and scientific applications.[59]
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera, successor to the X-Pro1, with a new 24 MP X-Trans III sensor and higher resolution EVF. Announced January 15, 2016.[60]
  • Fujifilm X-E2S: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera, minor update to the X-E2. Announced January 15, 2016.[61]
  • Fujifilm X70: Smaller version of the Fujifilm X100T, with an 18.5 mm lens (28 mm-equivalent) rather than a 23 mm (35 mm-equivalent) on the X100/S/T. Announced January 15, 2016.[62][6]
  • Fujifilm X-T2: Upgraded model from X-T1 with similar weather-sealed body but same sensor and image processor as X-Pro2. Announced July 7, 2016.[63]
  • Fujifilm X-A3: Upgraded model from the X-A2, with 24.2 MP CMOS sensor, 11 types of film simulations, and rear LCD with touchscreen.[64]
  • Fujifilm X-A10: Entry-model camera, detuned from X-A2. Without accessory shoe. Sold worldwide except Japan.[65]
  • Fujifilm X100F: Successor to X100T. Equipped with the same sensor and processor as X-Pro2. Focus lever on the back of the body, built-in ISO dial on the top.[66]
  • Fujifilm X-T20: Successor to X-T10. Same sensor and processor as X-T2. The tilt LCD on the back of the body becomes a touch panel; it also supports touch-autofocus and touch-shooting.[67]
  • Fujifilm X-E3: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera, successor to X-E2s. Equipped with the same sensor and processor as X100F, X-Pro2, X-T2 and X-T20. The D-Pad has been replaced by swiping motions on the Touchscreen. Announced September 7, 2017.[68][69]
  • Fujifilm X-A5: Successor to X-A3. Improved autofocus with new CMOS sensor and processor, new high dynamic range, and 4K movie shooting modes. New kit lens with XC 15 mm–45 mm f/3.5-5.3 OIS PZ. Announced January 31, 2018[70] and on sale beginning on February 15, 2018.
  • Fujifilm X-A20: Similar specifications to X-A10 with an addition of a touch sensitive LCD display. The X-A20 was limited to primarily Asian markets.[71]
  • Fujifilm X-H1: Based on X-T2, newly equipped with In-Body Image Stabilizer (IBIS),10000 compute per second, stabilizing is effective with all genuine lenses. Announced February 15, 2018[72] and available from March 1, 2018.[18]
  • Fujifilm X-T100: Largely based on the X-A5 and is nearly identical to X-T20,[73] equipped with an electronic viewfinder, a fully articulating touchscreen (3-way tilt) and a hybrid autofocus. Announced 2018 May 24.[74][75][17]
  • Fujifilm XF10: Successor to X70, but equipped with the same 24 megapixel Bayer sensor as the X-A5 & X-T100. Announced on July 19, 2018.[76][77][7]
  • Fujifilm X-T3: Successor to X-T2, but equipped with a new 26 MP X-Trans IV sensor. 3" tilting screen. ISO sensitivity to 51200. 4K/60P 4:2:2 10-bit (HDMI) and 4K/60P 4:2:0 10-bit (SD Card).[78] Announced September 6, 2018.[79][80]
  • Fujifilm X-T30: Successor to X-T20, but equipped with 26 megapixel sensor. 3" tilting screen. ISO sensitivity to 51200. Announced February 14, 2019.[81]
  • Fujifilm X-A7: Successor the X-A5, equipped the new 24.2MP APS-C CMOS image sensor. 3.5" fully articulating touch screen. It can record 4K videos is 30P. Announced September 12, 2019.[82][14]
  • Fujifilm X-Pro3: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera, successor to the X-Pro2, with the 4th generation 26.1MP X-Trans. Announced October 23, 2019.[83][84][9]
  • Fujifilm X-T200: Successor the X-T100, equipped the new 24.2MP APS-C CMOS image sensor. 3.5" fully articulating touch screen. It features a digital gimbal and an digital image stabilization. It can record 4K videos is 30P. Announced January 23, 2020.[85]
  • Fujifilm X100V: Successor to X100F. Equipped with the 4th generation 26.1MP X-Trans. A new two-way tilting touchscreen LCD that folds down flush with the back of the bod is also equipped in the camera. Announced February 4, 2020.[86][87][5]
  • Fujifilm X-T4: Successor to X-T3, equipped with fully articulating screen and a new battery. It will have an in-body stabilization. Announced on February 26, 2020.[88][89]
  • Fujifilm X-S10: First of its generation, a mid-range camera equipped with a in-body image stabilization and a fully articulating screen. Announced on October 15, 2020.[90][91]
  • Fujifilm X-E4: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera, successor to X-E3. Thinner than its predecessor and contains no grip. Announced on January 27, 2021.[92][93][11]
  • Fujifilm X-T30 II: An update to the X-T30. Compared to the X-T30, the new model has a higher resolution LCD and additional memory to improve overall performance. Announced September 2, 2021 and will be available in late October 2021.[94][95]

Fujifilm X-mount lensesEdit

All X-series cameras with interchangeable lenses use Fujifilm X-mount lenses. The first such lenses were introduced along with the X-Pro1 in early 2012. The original three lenses for the new system were a set of fixed-focal length prime lenses: an 18mm f/2 wide-angle, a 35mm f/1.4 standard and a 60mm f/2.4 macro lens.[96] The first X-mount zoom lens, an 18-55mm f/2.8–4, was released later in 2012.[97]

As of 2021, Fujifilm has released over 35 lenses for the system, all of which offer autofocus. In addition, a host of third-party companies have extended the selection to over 200 lenses, many of which are manual focus only.

X series accessoriesEdit

A wide variety of accessories for X series cameras and X-mount lenses have been introduced, both from Fujifilm[98] and from third party suppliers. These include lens mount adapters; conversion lenses; camera grips; camera cases; lens hoods, caps, and filters; flashes and flash accessories; microphones; remote releases; and batteries and chargers.

Lens adaptersEdit

Due to the short 17.7mm flange focal distance of the Fujifilm X mount, lenses from a vast array of other systems can be adapted for use on X series cameras. An adapter to allow use of Leica M-mount lenses on X-mount cameras is offered by Fujifilm. This adapter provides a way to set the focal length of the lens which will appear in image Exif info, and correct for common color shift and vignetting problems when using M-mount lenses on digital cameras.[99]

Third-party suppliers have added adapters for just about any lens mount that's been produced.[100] Many of these offer no electrical connection meaning they require manual focusing with aperture controlled on the lens. Some, e.g. for Canon EF lenses, allow the use of autofocus, while still others include internal lenses which alter the effective focal length of the lens.[101]

Conversion lensesEdit

  • Wide conversion lens WCL-X100[102]

Camera gripsEdit

  • Fujifilm hand grip HG-XPro1[103]

Camera casesEdit

  • Fujifilm leather softcase[104]

Flashes and accessoriesEdit

  • Fujifilm EF-X20 shoe-mount flash[105] a dedicated TTL flash with 20 mm equivalent angle using the built-in defuser. Guide number 20' (6.1 m) ISO100 at 50 mm position.

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