Frederick D. Goodwin

Frederick Deane Goodwin (November 5, 1888 – January 13, 1968) was bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, serving from 1944 to 1960. He served as coadjutor from 1930 to 1944.

The Right Reverend

Frederick D. Goodwin

D.D., LL.D.
Bishop of Virginia
Frederick Deane Goodwin.jpg
ChurchEpiscopal Church
DioceseVirginia
In office1944–1960
PredecessorHenry St. George Tucker
SuccessorRobert F. Gibson Jr.
Orders
OrdinationJune 1918
by Robert Atkinson Gibson
ConsecrationOctober 16, 1930
by Henry St. George Tucker
Personal details
Born(1888-11-05)November 5, 1888
DiedJanuary 13, 1968(1968-01-13) (aged 79)
Wheeling, West Virginia, United States
BuriedYeocomico Church
NationalityAmerican
DenominationAnglican
ParentsEdward Lewis Goodwin & Maria Love Smith
SpouseBlanche Elbert Moncure (m. October 6, 1917)
Children3
Previous post(s)Coadjutor Bishop of Virginia (1930–1944)

BiographyEdit

Goodwin was born on November 5, 1888, in Cismont, Virginia. He attended Episcopal High School, The College of William and Mary, and the Virginia Theological Seminary, from where he graduated in 1917. During the same year he was ordained deacon. Prior to his election as coadjutor bishop of Virginia, he served as rector of Cople, Lunenburg and North Farnham in Virginia.

On May 22, 1930, he was elected coadjutor Bishop of Virginia. He was elected on the first ballot at the 135th annual council of the diocese. He was consecrated bishop on October 16, 1930, by Henry St. George Tucker, Bishop of Virginia and future Presiding Bishop.[1] He succeeded as diocesan bishop on January 1, 1944, upon the resignation of Bishop Tucker. He served in that post until 1960 when he reached the mandatory age of retirement. He died on January 13, 1968, in Wheeling, West Virginia after a long illness.[2]

Goodwin was married to Blanche who died in 1955 and had 3 children.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Goodwin, Frederick Deane D.D.", The Living Church, New York, 1932. Retrieved on 07 October 2018.
  2. ^ "Bishop Goodwin dies", The Living Church, New York, 04 February 1968. Retrieved on 07 October 2018.

External linksEdit