Frank Mandel

Frank Mandel (1884 – April 20, 1958) was an American playwright and producer.[1][2][3] He co-wrote several productions. Some of his works were adapted by others. Several of his collaborations were adapted into films. UCLA's libraries have a collection of his papers.[4]

He was born Frank Armand Mandel in San Francisco.[5] He attended the University of California where he was interested in the public speaking society, the Student's Congress and debating team, as well as being active in the Glee Club, along with Richard Walton Tully.[5] H graduated in 1904 with a Bachelor of Letters degree then enteres Hastings Law School.[5] After his education he started selling suits with his father, working in real estate, and writing plays. When real estate took a dive after the 1905 earthquake and fire he got together L5ua00 and headed East to write plays.[5]

After writing No, No, Nanette, he formed the production team of Schwab and Mandel with Laurence Schwab. They produced works such as Follow Thru, Good News, The Firebrand and America's Sweetheart.[6]

He died on April 20, 1958, in Hollywood.[7]

TheaterEdit

FilmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Frank Mandel – Broadway Cast & Staff | IBDB". www.ibdb.com.
  2. ^ "Frank Mandel | Biography & History". AllMusic.
  3. ^ Feinstein, Michael (October 16, 2012). The Gershwins and Me: A Personal History in Twelve Songs. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9781451645330 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ "Finding Aid for the Frank Mandel Papers, 1892-1950". oac.cdlib.org.
  5. ^ a b c d "Oakland Tribune Newspaper Archives, Apr 27, 1958, p. 65 - Frank A. Mandel Obituary". NewspaperArchive.com. 27 April 1958. p. 65. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  6. ^ "Pasadena Independent Archives, Apr 22, 1958, p. 1". NewspaperArchive.com. 22 April 1958. p. 1. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  7. ^ "Tucson Daily Citizen Archives, Apr 22, 1958, p. 35". NewspaperArchive.com. 22 April 1958. p. 35. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  8. ^ "Kokomo Tribune Newspaper Archives, Mar 10, 1921, p. 12 - "My Lady Friends" at Strand Tonight". NewspaperArchive.com. 10 March 1921. p. 12. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  9. ^ "The Writer". The Writer. May 19, 1917 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ "Cincinnati Commercial Tribune Archives, Apr 27, 1924, p. 31". NewspaperArchive.com. 27 April 1924. Retrieved 9 June 2020.