Francis Burkitt

Francis Crawford Burkitt FBA (3 September 1864 – 1935) was an English theologian. As Norris Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge from 1905 until shortly before his death, Burkitt was a sturdy critic of the notion of a distinct "Caesarean Text" of the New Testament put forward by B. H. Streeter and others.

Francis Burkitt

Born
Francis Crawford Burkitt

(1864-09-03)3 September 1864
Died1935 (aged 70–71)
NationalityEnglish
Academic background
Alma materTrinity College, Cambridge
Influences
Academic work
Discipline
Sub-discipline
School or traditionAnglicanism[3]
InstitutionsTrinity College, Cambridge

Education and careerEdit

 
The inter-relationship between significant ancient manuscripts according to Burkitt

Burkitt was educated at Harrow School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read mathematics, graduating BA as 28th Wrangler in 1886, and gained first-class honours in the theological tripos in 1888.[4] Received MA in 1890, and Bachelor of Divinity and Doctorate in Divinity in 1915. Lecturer in Palaeography in 1903-1905, Norrisian Professor of Divinity, Cambridge 1905-1936[5] Chief promoter of and author of the Preface for the English translation of Albert Schweitzer's book, The Quest of the Historical Jesus, by W. Montgomery.

Burkitt accompanied Robert Bensly, James Rendel Harris, and sisters Agnes and Margaret Smith on the 1893 expedition to Saint Catherine's Monastery in Egypt to examine a Syriac palimpsest of the Gospels discovered there the previous year by the sisters. Burkitt played an important role in deciphering the text and in subsequent publication of the team's findings.[6]

Burkitt was a noted figure at Cambridge in 1912–1935 for his chairmanship of the Cambridge New Testament Seminar, attended by other prominent theologians, including Robert Newton Flew, who left an account of it in an obituary for Burkitt in the Proceedings of the British Academy.[7] He was also president of the Cambridge Philological Society from 1904 to 1905.[8]

The Burkitt Medal, awarded by the British Academy, is named in his honour.[9]

WorksEdit

 
Descriptions of end-time beliefs in Judaism and Christianity.
(The Schweich Lectures (1913).

BooksEdit

Edited byEdit

Journal articlesEdit

  • ——— (January 1900). "Notes. Saint Mark XV 34 in Codex Bobiensis". The Journal of Theological Studies. 1 (2): 278–279.[10]
  • ——— (January 1900). "Notes. On the Baptismal Rite in the Canons of Hippolytus". The Journal of Theological Studies. 1 (2): 279.
  • ——— (January 1900). "Notes. The Original Language or the Acts of Judas Thomas". The Journal of Theological Studies. 1 (2): 280–290.
  • ——— (October 1903). "Further Notes on codex k". The Journal of Theological Studies. 5 (17): 100–107.
  • ——— (October 1904). "The Palestinian Syriac Lectionary". The Journal of Theological Studies. 6 (21): 91–98.
  • ——— (October 1909). "The Oldest MS of St Justin's Martyrdom". The Journal of Theological Studies. 11 (41): 61–66.
  • ——— (January 1910). "Saint Augustine's Bible and the Itala". Journal of Theological Studies. 11 (42): 258–268.
  • ——— (April 1910). "The Peraean Ministry: A Reply". The Journal of Theological Studies. 11 (43): 412–415.
  • ——— (April 1910). "Saint Augustine's Bible and the Itala". The Journal of Theological Studies. 11 (43): 447–458.
  • ——— (July 1910). "Codex Alexandrinus". The Journal of Theological Studies. 11 (4): 603–606.
  • ——— (January 1911). "The Waters of Shiloah That Go Softly: A Note on Isaiah VIII 6". Journal of Theological Studies. 12 (46): 294–295.
  • ——— (January 1911). "On Matt. XI 27, Luke X 22". Journal of Theological Studies. 12 (46): 296–297.
  • ——— (April 1911). "Additional Note". Journal of Theological Studies. 12 (47): 457–459.
  • ——— (April 1911). "On Immediately in Matt. XXIV 29". Journal of Theological Studies. 12 (47): 460–461.
  • ——— (April 1912). "A New MS of the Odes of Solomon". Journal of Theological Studies. 13 (51): 372–385.
  • ——— (July 1912). "'Woman, What Have I To Do With Thee?'". Journal of Theological Studies. 13 (52): 594–595.
  • ——— (October 1919). "William Sanday". The Expository Times. 31 (1): 20–21.
  • ——— (February 1927). "The Baptism of Jesus". The Expository Times. 38 (5): 198–202.
  • ——— (October 1929). "A Further Note on the Pahlavi Crosses". The Journal of Theological Studies. 31 (121): 47–48.
  • ——— (April 1930). "The Didascalia". The Journal of Theological Studies. 31 (123): 258–265.
  • ——— (October 1934). "The Chester Beatty Biblical Papyri". The Journal of Theological Studies. 34 (136): 363–368.
  • ——— (July 1935). "The Dura Fragment of Tatian". The Journal of Theological Studies. 36 (143): 255–259.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chapman, Mark D. (2001). The Coming Crisis: The Impact of Eschatology on Theology in Edwardian England. Sheffield, England: Sheffield Academic Press. p. 81. ISBN 978-1-84127-185-9.
  2. ^ Lake, Kirsopp (1936). "F. C. Burkitt". Journal of Biblical Literature. 55 (1): 17. ISSN 0021-9231. JSTOR 3259687.
  3. ^ Lake, Kirsopp (1936). "F. C. Burkitt". Journal of Biblical Literature. 55 (1): 18. ISSN 0021-9231. JSTOR 3259687.
  4. ^ "Burkitt, Francis Crawford (BRKT882FC)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  5. ^ http://venn.lib.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/search-2018.pl?sur=Burkitt&suro=w&fir=Francis+Crawford&firo=c&cit=&cito=c&c=all&z=all&tex=&sye=&eye=&col=all&maxcount=50
  6. ^ Soskice, Janet (2010) Sisters of Sinai: How Two Lady Adventurers Found the Hidden Gospels. London: Vintage, pp. 146–87.
  7. ^ His account is quoted at length in Suffering and Martyrdom in the New Testament, ed. William Horbury and Brian McNeill (Cambridge: Cambridge UP), pp. xiii–xv.
  8. ^ https://archive.org/details/1910historicalreg00univuoft/page/1008/mode/2up?q=%22Francis+Crawford+Burkitt%22 p. 1008
  9. ^ "Burkitt Medal (Biblical Studies)". Prizes and Medals. British Academy. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  10. ^ "The Journal of theological studies JTS". 1900. pp. 278–279.

External linksEdit

Academic offices
Preceded by
Frederic Chase
Norrisian Professor
1905–1934
Succeeded by
Himself
as Norris–Hulse Professor
of Divinity
Preceded by
William Emery Barnes
as Hulsean Professor of Divinity
Norris–Hulse Professor of Divinity
1934–1935
Succeeded by
C. H. Dodd
Preceded by
Himself
as Norrisian Professor