First Biesheuvel cabinet

The First Biesheuvel cabinet was the executive branch of the Dutch Government from 6 July 1971 until 9 August 1972. The cabinet was formed by the christian-democratic Catholic People's Party (KVP), Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) and Christian Historical Union (CHU), the conservative-liberal People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and the social-democratic Democratic Socialists '70 (DS'70) after the election of 1971. The cabinet was a centrist coalition and had a slim majority in the House of Representatives with Protestant Leader Barend Biesheuvel a former Minister of Agriculture serving as Prime Minister. Prominent Catholic politician Roelof Nelissen the Minister of Economic Affairs in the previous cabinet served as Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Finance and was given the portfolio of Suriname and Netherlands Antilles Affairs, former Liberal Leader Molly Geertsema served as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Interior.

First Biesheuvel cabinet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
53rd Cabinet of the Netherlands
Kabinet 1971-07-06 - SFA001006592.jpg ZetelsBiesheuvel.svg
The installation of the First Biesheuvel cabinet on 6 July 1971
Date formed6 July 1971 (1971-07-06)
Date dissolved9 August 1972 (1972-08-09)
1 year, 34 days in office
(Demissionary from 19 July 1972 (1972-07-19))
People and organisations
MonarchQueen Juliana
Prime MinisterBarend Biesheuvel
Deputy Prime MinisterRoelof Nelissen
Molly Geertsema
No. of ministers16
Ministers removed2
Total no. of members16
Member partyCatholic People's Party
(KVP)
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy

(VVD)
Anti-Revolutionary Party
(ARP)
Christian Historical Union
(CHU)
Democratic Socialists '70
(DS'70)
Status in legislatureCentrist
Majority government
History
Election(s)1971 election
Outgoing election1972 election
Legislature term(s)1971–1972
Incoming formation1971 formation
Outgoing formation1972–1973 formation
PredecessorDe Jong cabinet
SuccessorSecond Biesheuvel cabinet

The cabinet served in the early years of the radical 1970s. Domestically it had to deal with the peak of the counterculture and a growing inflation but it was able to implement several social reforms to the public sector and stimulating deregulation and privatization. The cabinet suffered several major internal conflicts between the cabinet members of the Democratic Socialists '70 and the rest of the coalition which lead to the fall of the cabinet just 1 year into its term on 19 July 1972 with the Democratic Socialists '70 cabinet members resigning on 21 July 1972 and the cabinet continued in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced with the caretaker Second Biesheuvel cabinet on 9 August 1972.[1][2][3][4][5]

TermEdit

Problems of the cabinet were the release of war criminals (three of Breda) and the increasing inflation, combined with a stagnating economy (stagflation). The decision to cut government expenses was not supported by DS'70, so the cabinet lost its majority in the parliament, resulting in Biesheuvel II.

Minister Stuyt, the first minister for environmental affairs, issued an urgency-note concerning the environment. In 1972, the first report from the Club of Rome was published, which showed that the environment is in a bad state worldwide and that resources will eventually run out.

The cabinet recognised the GDR and voted to allow China back into the United Nations.

 
Princess Joséphine Charlotte of Belgium, Queen Juliana, Grand Duke Jean of Luxembourg and Minister of Foreign Affairs Norbert Schmelzer at Luxembourg Airport on 7 July 1971.
 
Prime Minister of Norway Trygve Bratteli and Prime Minister Barend Biesheuvel at the Catshuis on 8 January 1972.

Cabinet MembersEdit

Ministers Title/Ministry/Portfolio(s) Term of office Party
  Barend Biesheuvel
(1920–2001)
Prime Minister General Affairs 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Roelof Nelissen
(1931–2019)
Deputy
Prime Minister
Finance 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
Minister
  Molly Geertsema
(1918–1991)
Deputy
Prime Minister
Interior 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
Minister
  Norbert Schmelzer
(1921–2008)
Minister Foreign Affairs 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dries van Agt
(born 1931)
Minister Justice 6 July 1971 –
8 September 1977
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Harrie Langman
(1931–2016)
Minister Economic Affairs 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
  Hans de Koster
(1914–1992)
Minister Defence 6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
  Dr.
Louis Stuyt
(1914–2000)
Minister Health and
Environment
6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Jaap Boersma
(1929–2012)
Minister Social Affairs 6 July 1971 –
19 December 1977
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Chris van Veen
(1922–2009)
Minister Education and
Sciences
6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
  Dr.
Willem Drees Jr.
(1922–1998)
Minister Transport and
Water Management
6 July 1971 –
21 July 1972
[Res]
Democratic
Socialists '70
  Bé Udink
(1926–2016)
21 July 1972 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
  Pierre Lardinois
(1924–1987)
Minister Agriculture and
Fisheries
5 April 1967 –
1 January 1973
[Retained] [Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Bé Udink
(1926–2016)
Minister Housing and
Spatial Planning
6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
  Piet Engels
(1923–1994)
Minister Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
Ministers without portfolio Title/Ministry/Portfolio(s) Term of office Party
  Roelof Nelissen
(1931–2019)
Minister Interior Suriname and
Netherlands
Antilles Affairs
6 July 1971 –
28 January 1972
Catholic
People's Party
  Pierre Lardinois
(1924–1987)
28 January 1972 –
1 January 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Kees Boertien
(1927–2002)
Minister Foreign Affairs Development
Cooperation
6 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Jonkheer
Mauk de Brauw
(1925–1984)
Minister Education and
Sciences
Higher
Education

Science Policy
6 July 1971 –
21 July 1972
[Res]
Democratic
Socialists '70
  Chris van Veen
(1922–2009)
21 July 1972 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
State Secretaries Title/Ministry/Portfolio(s) Term of office Party
  Jan van
Stuijvenberg

(born 1928)
State Secretary Interior Municipalities
Civil Service
17 July 1971 –
21 July 1972
[Res]
Democratic
Socialists '70
  Tjerk Westerterp
(born 1930)
State Secretary Foreign Affairs European Union
Benelux
17 August 1971 –
7 March 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Willem Scholten
(1927–2005)
State Secretary Finance Fiscal Policy
Tax and Customs
14 July 1971 –
19 March 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
  Fons van der Stee
(1928–1999)
Governmental
Budget
14 July 1971 –
12 March 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Hans Grosheide
(born 1930)
State Secretary Justice Immigration
and Asylum

Civil Law
• Youth Justice
Penitentiaries
28 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Jan Oostenbrink
(born 1936)
State Secretary Economic Affairs Small and
Medium-sized
Businesses

• Consumer
Protection
Tourism
17 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Vice admiral
Adri van Es
(1913–1994)
State Secretary Defence Human
Resources

Equipment
14 August 1963 –
16 September 1972
[Retained] [Continued]
Anti-Revolutionary
Party
  Koos Rietkerk
(1927–1986)
State Secretary Social Affairs • Social Security
• Unemployment
Occupational
Safety

• Social Services
28 July 1971 –
23 April 1973
[Continued]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
  Kees Schelfhout
(1918–1983)
State Secretary Education and
Sciences
Primary
Education

Special
Education

Preschool
28 July 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Dr.
Roelof Kruisinga
(1922–2012)
State Secretary Transport and
Water Management
Public
Infrastructure

Public
Transport

Rail Transport
Water
Management

Postal Service
Weather
Forecasting
28 July 1971 –
20 March 1973
[Continued]
Christian
Historical Union
  Werner Buck
(1925–2010)
State Secretary Housing and
Spatial Planning
Urban Planning
Spatial Planning
17 August 1971 –
11 May 1973
[Continued]
Catholic
People's Party
  Fia van
Veenendaal-
van Meggelen

(1918–2005)
State Secretary Culture, Recreation
and Social Work
• Social Services
Disability Policy
28 July 1971 –
21 July 1972
[Res]
Democratic
Socialists '70
  Henk Vonhoff
(1931–2010)
Youth Care
• Nature
Culture
Art
• Recreation
Sport
28 July 1971 –
23 April 1973
[Continued]
People's Party
for Freedom and
Democracy
Resigned
Retained from the previous cabinet
Continued in the next cabinet

TriviaEdit

  • Six cabinet members (later) served as Party Leaders and Lijsttrekkers: Barend Biesheuvel (1963–1973) of the Anti-Revolutionary Party, Molly Geertsema (1969–1971) of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy, Norbert Schmelzer (1963–1971) of the Catholic People's Party, Dries van Agt (1976–1982) of the Christian Democratic Appeal, Willem Drees Jr. (1971–1977) of the Democratic Socialists '70, Bé Udink (1970–1971) and Roelof Kruisinga (1971–1977) of the Christian Historical Union.
  • Five cabinet members had previous experience as scholars and professors: Dries van Agt (Criminal Law and Procedure), Louis Stuyt (Internal Medicine), Willem Drees Jr. (Public Economics), Kees Boertien (Commercial Law) and Roelof Kruisinga (Otorhinolaryngology).
  • Four cabinet members (later) served as Queen's Commissioner: Molly Geertsema (Gelderland), Dries van Agt (North Brabant), Kees Boertien (Zeeland) and Henk Vonhoff (Groningen).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ideeën van Drees jr. waren te afwijkend" (in Dutch). Volkskrant. 8 September 1998. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  2. ^ (in Dutch) Mooie Barend. De vergeten premier, Volkskrant, 9 June 2012
  3. ^ (in Dutch) De driftbuien van Mooie Barend, Historischnieuwsblad.nl, 6 May 2001
  4. ^ "Biesheuvel, Barend Willem (1920–2001)" (in Dutch). Huygens ING. 12 November 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  5. ^ (in Dutch) Mr. B. W. (Barend) Biesheuvel 6 juli 1971 – 11 mei 1973, Geschiedenis24.nl, 9 December 2005

External linksEdit

Official