Figure skating at the 1952 Winter Olympics – Men's singles

The men's figure skating competition at the 1952 Winter Olympics took place on 19 and 21 February at Jordal Amfi and Bislett stadion.[1] The compulsory figures were held at Jordal Amfi, while the Free skating was contested at Bislett stadion. The ice surface at Bislett was set inside the oval created by the speed skating track. It was also an outdoor arena, which was used for the opening and closing ceremonies.[2] There were no issues with the weather and the skating surface at Bislett was immaculate.[3] Computers were used for the first time during the figure skating competitions to help tabulate the judges' marks and relay the results instantaneously.[4]

Men's singles
at the VI Olympic Winter Games
Figure skating pictogram.svg
VenuesJordal Amfi (compulsory figures)
Bislett Stadion (free skate)
Dates19-21 February
Competitors14 from 11 nations
Medalists
1st place, gold medalist(s) Dick Button
 United States
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Hellmut Seibt
 Austria
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) James Grogan
 United States
← 1948
1956 →

American Dick Button was the dominant force in men's international skating, having won the Olympic title in 1948, and the World Championships in 1948, 1949, 1950 and 1951.[5] Only three men had come close to challenging him in the years since his first Olympic victory, teammates Hayes Jenkins and James Grogan, and Austrian Helmut Seibt, who had won the European Championships in 1951 and 1952.[5] Button took a strong lead after the compulsory figures and just needed to skate safely in the free skating to earn his second gold medal.[4][6] Instead he chose to perform the triple loop, which was the first triple jump ever performed in international competition.[4] He executed the jump without error and finished his skate cleanly, he was awarded perfect marks by the judges and won his second Olympic gold medal.[4][5]

The battle for second place was much closer and hotly contested between Hellmut Seibt and James Grogan. Seibt did well in the compulsories but faltered in the free skating. Grogan was third after the compulsories but could not overtake Seibt in the free skating. The final marks placed Seibt in second place by one-tenth of a point, the closest possible margin.[5] Hayes Jenkins placed fourth and went on to win the gold medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy.[7] One week later Button, Grogan and Jenkins swept the World Championships.[5] For Dick Button it was his fifth consecutive world title, it also marked the end of his competitive skating career.[8]

ResultsEdit

Here are the results of the men's figure skating competition.[5]

Rank Name Nation CF FS Points Places
1 Dick Button   United States 1 1 192.256 9
2 Hellmut Seibt   Austria 2 5 180.144 23
3 James Grogan   United States 3 2 180.822 24
4 Hayes Alan Jenkins   United States 5 3 174.589 40
5 Peter Firstbrook   Canada 4 4 173.122 43
6 Carlo Fassi   Italy 6 7 169.822 50
7 Alain Giletti   France 7 6 163.233 63
8 Freimut Stein   Germany 8 8 155.956 72
9 François Pache   Switzerland 9 11 139.922 92
10 Adrian Swan   Australia 12 9 138.689 95
11 Kurt Oppelt   Austria 11 10 137.033 98
12 György Czakó   Hungary 14 12 132.233 112
13 Kalle Tuulos   Finland 13 13 131.211 112
14 Per Cock-Clausen   Denmark 10 11 133.722 112

Referee:

Assistant Referee:

Judges:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Figure Skating at the 1952 Winter Olympics: Singles, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 3 July 2020.
  2. ^ Organising Committee for the VI Winter Olympic Games (1952), p. 28
  3. ^ "The Olympics: 1948 and 1952", Skating magazine, February 1960
  4. ^ a b c d "Oslo 1952". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 9 September 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Figure Skating at the 1952 Oslo Winter Games: Men's Singles". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 9 September 2010.
  6. ^ Judd (2008), p. 95
  7. ^ Comitato Olimpico Nazionale Italiano (1956), p. 662–667
  8. ^ Berkes, Howard (16 February 2010). "Dick Button: A Cutting Edge Behind The Olympic Mic". National Public Radio. Retrieved 9 September 2010.

External linksEdit