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Ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate

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Ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate is an organometallic compound with the formula [Fe(C5H5)2]BF4. This salt is composed of the cation [Fe(C5H5)2]+ and the tetrafluoroborate anion (BF
4
). The related hexafluorophosphate is also a popular reagent with similar properties. The cation is often abbreviated Fc+ or Cp2Fe+. The salt is deep blue in color and paramagnetic.

Ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate
Ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate.svg
Names
Other names
dicyclopentadienyl iron tetrafluoroborate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.156.161
Properties
C10H10BFeF4
Molar mass 272.84 g/mol
Appearance dark blue powder
Melting point 178 °C (352 °F; 451 K) (decomposes)
Solubility in acetonitrile Soluble[citation needed]
Hazards[1]
Safety data sheet External MSDS
GHS pictograms The corrosion pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word Danger
H314
P280, P305+351+338, P310
Related compounds
Related compounds
Ferrocene
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Ferrocenium salts are sometimes used as one-electron oxidizing agents, and the reduced product, ferrocene, is inert and readily separated from ionic products. The ferrocene–ferrocenium couple is often used as a reference in electrochemistry. The standard potential of ferrocene-ferrocenium is 0.400 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)[2] and is often assumed to be invariant between different solvents.

PreparationEdit

Commercially available, this compound may be prepared by oxidizing ferrocene typically with ferric salts followed by addition of fluoroboric acid.[3] A variety of other oxidants work well also, such as nitrosyl tetrafluoroborate.[4] Many analogous ferrocenium salts are known.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ferrocenium tetrafluoroborate 482358". Sigma-Aldrich.
  2. ^ Bard, A.J.; Parsons, R.; Jordan, J. (1985). Standard Potentials in Aqueous Solution. New York: IUPAC.
  3. ^ Connelly, N. G.; Geiger, W. E. (1996). "Chemical Redox Agents for Organometallic Chemistry". Chem. Rev. 96 (2): 877–910. doi:10.1021/cr940053x. PMID 11848774.
  4. ^ Nielson, Roger M.; McManis, George E.; Safford, Lance K.; Weaver, Michael J. (1989). "Solvent and electrolyte effects on the kinetics of ferrocenium-ferrocene self-exchange. A reevaluation". J. Phys. Chem. 93 (5): 2152. doi:10.1021/j100342a086.
  5. ^ Le Bras, J.; Jiao, H.; Meyer, W. E.; Hampel, F.; Gladysz, J. A. (2000). "Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Reactions of the 17-Valence-Electron Rhenium Methyl Complex [(η5-C5Me5)Re(NO)(P(4-C6H4CH3)3)(CH3)]+ B(3,5-C
    6
    H
    3
    (CF
    3
    )
    2
    )
    4
    : Experimental and Computational Bonding Comparisons with 18-Electron Methyl and Methylidene Complexes". J. Organomet. Chem. 616: 54–66. doi:10.1016/S0022-328X(00)00531-3.