Curzon Park Abbey

(Redirected from Feltham Priory)

Curzon Park Abbey is one of three monasteries of nuns in the English Benedictine Congregation.

Curzon Park Abbey
Curzon Park Abbey is located in Cheshire
Curzon Park Abbey
Location within Cheshire
Monastery information
Full nameCurzon Park Abbey
OrderBenedictine
Established24 June 1868
Dedicated toOur Lady Help of Christians
DioceseShrewsbury
Controlled churchesCurzon Park Abbey
People
Founder(s)Mother Hilda Stewart
Site
LocationCurzon Park, Chester, England
Coordinates53°10′51″N 2°54′14″W / 53.180833°N 2.903889°W / 53.180833; -2.903889Coordinates: 53°10′51″N 2°54′14″W / 53.180833°N 2.903889°W / 53.180833; -2.903889

HistoryEdit

It began as an Anglican Benedictine convent at Feltham, Middlesex, founded by Father Ignatius on 24 June 1868. Feltham Priory, or Feltham Nunnery, was dedicated to Saints Mary and Scholastica (twin sister of St Benedict).[1]

The community spent 5 years in Feltham[1] before moving to Twickenham, West Malling and Milford Haven before settling in Talacre, North Wales in 1920, having been received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1913. In 1921, the nuns were accepted as members of the English Benedictine Congregation, thus inheriting a venerable tradition and a more deeply rooted Catholic identity. The changes heralded by Vatican II led to an increasing simplification in the style of monastic life. The present Community is responding to the call for renewal within the Church, and finding an authentic role in society today.

In July 1988 the community of nuns moved to a much smaller property in Curzon Park, Chester, where they also have a small retreat house. The main Abbey building is a converted late 19th Century mansion constructed mainly of red brick. A chapel was built on the Curzon Park Abbey site in 1997.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b William Page, ed. (1911). "Spelthorne Hundred: Feltham". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 2: General; Ashford, East Bedfont with Hatton, Feltham, Hampton with Hampton Wick, Hanworth, Laleham, Littleton. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 15 April 2011.

External linksEdit