F minor

F minor is a minor scale based on F, consisting of the pitches F, G, A, B, C, D, and E. Its key signature consists of four flats. Its relative major is A-flat major and its parallel major is F major. Its enharmonic equivalent, E-sharp minor, has eight sharps, including the double sharp Fdouble sharp, which makes it rarely used.

F minor
A-flat-major f-minor.svg
Relative keyA-flat major
Parallel keyF major
Dominant keyC minor
SubdominantB-flat minor
Component pitches
F, G, A, B, C, D, E

The F natural minor scale is:

 {
\override Score.TimeSignature #'stencil = ##f
\relative c' {
  \clef treble \key f \minor \time 7/4
  f4^\markup "F natural minor scale" g aes bes c des es f es des c bes aes g f2
  \clef bass \key f \minor
} }

Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The F harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:

 {
\override Score.TimeSignature #'stencil = ##f
\relative c' {
  \clef treble \key f \minor \time 7/4
  f4^\markup "F harmonic minor scale" g aes bes c des e f e des c bes aes g f2
} }
 {
\override Score.TimeSignature #'stencil = ##f
\relative c' {
  \clef treble \key f \minor \time 7/4
  f4^\markup "F melodic minor scale (ascending and descending)" g aes bes c d e f es! des! c bes aes g f2
} }

Music in F minorEdit

Famous pieces in the key of F minor include Beethoven's Appassionata Sonata, Chopin's Piano Concerto No. 2, Haydn's Symphony No. 49, La Passione and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4.

Glenn Gould once said if he could be any key, he would be F minor, because "it's rather dour, halfway between complex and stable, between upright and lascivious, between gray and highly tinted... There is a certain obliqueness."[1]

Helmholtz once described F minor as harrowing and melancholy. Schubart described this key as "Deep depression, funereal lament, groans of misery and longing for the grave". [2]

Notable compositionsEdit

E-sharp minorEdit

E-sharp minor
 
Relative keyG-sharp major
Parallel keyE-sharp major
Dominant keyB-sharp minor
SubdominantA-sharp minor
EnharmonicF minor
Component pitches
E, F , G, A, B, C, D

E-sharp minor is a theoretical key based on the musical note E and consisting of the pitches E, F , G, A, B, C and D. Its key signature has six sharps and one double sharp (or eight sharps).

The E-sharp natural minor scale is:

 

Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The E-sharp harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:

 
 

Its relative major is G-sharp major, which is usually replaced by A-flat major. Its parallel major, E-sharp major, is usually replaced by F major, due to the presence of 4 double-sharps in the E-sharp major scale causing it to be one of the more impractical key signatures in music to use. Although E-sharp minor is usually notated as F minor, it could be used on a local level, such as bars 17 to 22 in Johann Sebastian Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1, Prelude and Fugue No. 3 in C-sharp major. (E-sharp minor is the mediant minor key of C-sharp major.)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Cathering Meng, Tonight's the Night (Apostrophe Books, 2007): 21
  2. ^ https://www.wmich.edu/mus-theo/courses/keys.html

External linksEdit

  •   Media related to F minor at Wikimedia Commons