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The FIFA Congress is the supreme legislative body of the International Federation of Association Football (French: Fédération Internationale de Football Association), commonly known by the acronym FIFA /ˈffə/. FIFA is the international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer. The congress may be ordinary or extraordinary.

An ordinary congress meets every year, an extraordinary congress may be convened by the FIFA Council (formerly Executive Committee) at any time with the support of one fifth of the members of FIFA.[1]

Each of the 211 members of FIFA has one vote in the congress. The members of FIFA can propose candidates for the World Cup Host and Presidency of FIFA. The FIFA Presidential Election and FIFA World Cup Host country election takes place at the congress in the year following the FIFA World Cup.[2]

Contents

HistoryEdit

The FIFA Congress has been held annually since 1998. It was previously held every two years. Congresses were not held between 1915 and 1922 and 1939 to 1945, due to the First and Second World Wars.

FIFA Presidential Elections have taken place at the 1st, 3rd, 12th, 29th, 30th, 39th, 51st, 53rd, 61st and 65th congresses.

The 1961 FIFA Extraordinary Congress in London elected Stanley Rous as President.[3]

The 2016 FIFA Extraordinary Congress in Zürich elected Gianni Infantino as the new president on 26 February 2016.[4]

Only five elections have had two or more candidates: the 39th (1974), 51st (1998), 53rd (2002), 65th (2015), and 2016 Extraordinary Congress.

List of congressesEdit

  Congress voting for president
* Extraordinary Congress
  Congress vote for World Cup Host
Congress
number[5]
Year City Member associations
attending
1st 1904   Paris 5
2nd 1905 5
3rd 1906   Bern 7
4th 1907   Amsterdam 12
5th 1908   Vienna 16
* 1908   Brussels 7
6th 1909   Budapest 13
7th 1910   Milan 12
8th 1911   Dresden 11
9th 1912   Stockholm 17
10th 1913   Copenhagen 12
11th 1914   Christiania (Oslo) 17
12th 1923   Geneva 17
13th 1924   Paris 27
14th 1925   Prague 22
15th 1926   Rome 23
16th 1927   Helsinki 21
17th 1928   Amsterdam 29
18th 1929   Barcelona 23
19th 1930   Budapest 27
20th 1931   Berlin 25
21st 1932   Stockholm 29
22nd 1934   Rome 27
23rd 1936   Berlin 37
24th 1938   Paris 30
25th 1946   Luxembourg 34
26th 1948   London 48
27th 1950   Rio de Janeiro 35
28th 1952   Helsinki 56
* 1953   Paris 48
29th 1954   Bern 52
30th 1956   Lisbon 57
31st 1958   Stockholm 62
32nd 1960   Rome 69
* 1961   London 67
33rd 1962   Santiago 59
34th 1964   Tokyo 99
35th 1966   London 94
36th 1968   Guadalajara 78
37th 1970   Mexico City 86
38th 1972   Paris 102
39th 1974   Frankfurt 122
40th 1976   Montreal 108
41st 1978   Buenos Aires 107
42nd 1980   Zürich 103
43rd 1982   Madrid 127
44th 1984   Zürich 112
45th 1986   Mexico City 111
46th 1988   Zürich 111
47th 1990   Rome 130
48th 1992   Zürich 118
49th 1994   Chicago 164
50th 1996   Zürich 182
51st (details) 1998   Paris 196
* 1999   Los Angeles 195
52nd 2000   Zurich 200
* 2001   Buenos Aires 202
* 2002   Seoul 202
53rd (details) 2002 202
* 2003   Doha 204
54th 2004   Paris 203
55th 2005   Marrakesh 203
56th 2006   Munich 207
57th 2007   Zürich 206
58th 2008   Sydney 200
59th 2009   Nassau 205
60th 2010   Johannesburg 207
61st (details) 2011   Zürich 208
62nd 2012   Budapest 209
63rd 2013   Mauritius 208
64th 2014   São Paulo 209
65th (details) 2015   Zürich 210
* (details) 2016 207
66th 2016   Mexico City 209
67th 2017   Manama[6] 211
68th (details) 2018   Moscow 210
69th (details) 2019   Paris 211
70th 2020   Addis Ababa
71st 2021
72nd 2022   Doha

Extraordinary congressesEdit

A total of eight extraordinary congresses have taken place: 1908 (Brussels), 1953 (Paris), 1961 (London), 1999 (Los Angeles), 2001 (Buenos Aires), 2002 (Seoul), 2003 (Doha), and 2016 (Zürich).[7] In the 2016 Extraordinary Congress, FIFA President Sepp Blatter would have remained in his position until his successor is elected.[8] However, due to the fact he was suspended, the Acting FIFA President, Issa Hayatou was in charge of FIFA.[9]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIFA Statutes (2010 edition)" (PDF). 19 October 2003. p. 21.
  2. ^ "FIFA Congress". FIFA. Archived from the original on 2010-04-05.
  3. ^ "FIFA presidential elections". FIFA. Archived from the original on 2010-04-08.
  4. ^ Sweetman, Tom. "FIFA: Presidential election confirmed for February 26". CNN. 20 October 2015. Accessed on 22 December 2015.
  5. ^ "FIFA Congress venues 1904-2016" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  6. ^ "FIFA Council discusses vision for the future of football".
  7. ^ FIFA Congress venues from 1904 to 2011
  8. ^ "FIFA President to lay down his mandate at extraordinary elective Congress". FIFA. 2 June 2015. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  9. ^ https://www.fifa.com/about-fifa/acting-president/index.html

External linksEdit