Open main menu

Fútbol Club Motagua (Spanish pronunciation: [moˈtaɣwa]), formerly Club Deportivo Motagua up to 2017,[1] is an association football club, located in Tegucigalpa, capital of Honduras.[2]

Motagua
C.D. Motagua badge.png
Full nameFútbol Club Motagua
Nickname(s)Ciclón Azul (Blue Cyclone)
Aguilas (Eagles)
Azul Profundo (Deep Blue)
Los Mimados (The Loved Ones)
Founded29 August 1928; 91 years ago (1928-08-29)
GroundEstadio Nacional
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Capacity35,000
PresidentPedro Atala Zablah
CoachDiego Vásquez
LeagueLiga Nacional
2018–19Winners (Apertura and Clausura)
Current season

F.C. Motagua was founded as Club Deportivo Motagua on 29 August 1928. The club competes in the Honduran top division playing its home games at the Estadio Nacional. The club is one of the most successful and renowned in Honduras.

HistoryEdit

The club was founded on 29 August 1928. Three previous clubs, América, Honduras Atlética and Águila, were in the process of falling apart. Marco Antonio Ponce and Marco Antonio Rosa called a meeting and proposed that the clubs unite to form a new club, Motagua (named for a nearby river). After the success of the meeting, a board of directors was appointed.

The first game, played on 25 November, 1928 was against Tejeros del España at La Isla.[3] Constantine Gálvez "Tatino" was the captain and Daniel Bustillo the manager. The team fought to a 1–1 draw.

The first international game was played on 9 April 1939 against Costa Rican side Orión at the San Felipe field in Tegucigalpa; Motagua were managed by Honduran coach Lurio Martínez and won the match 3–0 with three goals from "Gorgojo" Ramos.[4]

Professional EraEdit

The team debuted professionally in the 1965–66 season. It took them only three years to win their first-ever championship. Under the leadership of manager Rodolfo Godoy, Motagua surged past two-time defending champions Olimpia to win the 1968–69 title, with 39 points to the Olimpia's 36. Godoy's club completed the double that season by winning the first-ever Honduran Cup.

This was the beginning of a long run at or near the top of the table for Motagua; they finished second behind Olimpia in 1969–70, then won the 1970–71 crown. That last season ended with Motagua and Olimpia level on points, with Motagua hoisting the crown on goal difference. They would likely have won a third championship in 1972–73, as they led the table halfway through the season. However, the season was cancelled at its midway point, and the records expunged.

The rest of the 1970s remained a good time for Motagua. They won titles in 1973–74 and 1978–79, while finishing second in 1974–75 and 1976–77. The club had become established as one of the nation's strongest, and when the Honduras national football team qualified to the World Cup Finals, they featured five Motagua's players.

However, the 1980s were not as strong. Between 1979 and 1992, the club was locked out of the Honduran crown. It wasn't until the end of the 1991–92 season that the drought was over. They claimed that title by beating Real España 1–0 in the championship playoffs. With the drought broken, Motagua began winning titles regularly. They claimed the Honduran Cup in 1993 and 1995, then claimed an unexpected championship in the 1998 Apertura, beating Real España 5–2 on aggregate in the championship final. They repeated as champions that October, beating Olimpia 1–0.

They did it again in 1999-200, beating Olimpia on penalties in both the Apertura and Clausura finals. They added another title in the 2002 Apertura, beating Marathón a thrilling 5–3 on penalties. After a drought of nearly five years, Motagua returned to the top with a title in the 2006 Apertura (over Olimpia) and 2011 Clausura (again over Olimpia).

In 2013, a new golden age began. Diego Vásquez, a veteran Honduran keeper who had played in two stints for Motagua, took over. In just his second full season, Vasquez steer Motagua to the 2014 Apertura crown, beating Real Sociedad 2–1 in the championship final (Rubilio Castillo's header was the winner). Three near misses followed, but in 2016–2017, Vasquez would lead the team to new heights.

It started in the 2016 Apertura. After taking 4th in the regular season, Motagua battled their way through the quarterfinals and semi-finals (beating Olimpia). Then they held off Platense 2–1 on aggregate to win the Apertura title. In the Clausura, they finished 2nd in the regular season, then stormed to the title, crushing Honduras Progreso 7–1 on aggregate.

Vasquez, who remains Motagua's manager, is the longest tenured manager in the history of Honduras's top-flight; he has managed 200 consecutive matches with Las Aguilas.

Overall, between both amateur and professional seasons, Motagua has won 27 titles. They have won 16 professional titles. The club has participated in all Honduran top division seasons since its inception in 1965 and is one of the few unrelegated teams.

The clubEdit

Colours and badgesEdit

 
 
 
 
 
Home: 1928–present
 
 
 
 
 
 
Home: 1984
 
 
 
 
 
 
Home: 1988
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2003
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2007–09
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2010–11
 
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2011–12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alternative: 2011–13
 
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2013–14
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2014–15
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2015–16
 
 
 
 
 
Alternative: 2014–16
 
 
 
 
 
 
Away: 2017–18
 
 
 
 
 
Alternative: 2017–18


1980's–2016 1990's 2010–13 2013–14

Motagua's traditional colour is dark blue representing the blue waters of the Motagua River. This is because that at the time the club was founded, the Motagua River was in dispute between Honduras and Guatemala. Since 2011, Motagua plays all their games in pink jerseys for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month during the month of October.

The Motagua badge has a blue eagle. This is because one of the desintengrated club that united to become Motagua was named CD Águila, which means to Eagle.

StadiumEdit

Motagua plays their home matches at Estadio Nacional in Tegucigalpa. The stadium is named after the Honduran president Estadio Nacional. The stadium is divided into Sol Norte, Sol Sur, Sol Centro, Preferencia, Silla and Palco. The Motaguan supporters "La Revo" are located at Sol Norte and the "Macro Azurra" sits in Sol Centro.

TraditionsEdit

There are some traditions within the Motagua institution.

Debuting players– When a new player debuts, he must shave his head. This is optional, most of the players that do shave are recently promoted from the reserve team or are young of age.

SupportersEdit

Motagua has many supporters throughout Honduras. Motagua has one Barra Brava and three other supporters' groups. The barra brava is "Los Revolucionarios del Motagua 1928", who call themselves "La Revo". This fan group has "bandas" or smaller groups inside La Revo such as (from Tegucigalpa) "Los Fuser", "Los Dementes", "Escuadron 57", "Comando 21", "Los Poltershe", "Irreverentes", "Capone", "Infernales", "Danger's", "Anarkia", etc. (from Comayagua) "C26", (from San Pedro Sula) "Los Del Norte", (from La Ceiba) "Revo Ceiba", (from Choluteca) "Revo Choluteca", (from El Progreso) "Revo Progreso", (from Siguatepeque) "Revo Sigua". All of the "bandas" hang "mantas" or huge pieces of cloth saying their banda's name inside the stadium. They also hang one with the barra's website and many of Che Guevara. Matches from Motagua against Olimpia it's illegal to hang these mantas because some of the members go to steal them and cause great scandal so police prefer banning this. La Revo don't cause many scandals between other barras bravas in Honduras only with Olimpia's Ultra Fiel. Throughout 2006–07 La Revo had problems with Marathon's Furia Verde but they came to peace under the same belief in all of Honduras. "Por Una Honduras Libre De Chucos" which translates to "For a Honduras free of Dirtbags" (Chucos being Olimpia). Marathon, Real España and Motagua's barra bravas all have a manta with this phrase.

Another of the biggest fan group is named "Macro Azurra" which is supported by the club. They can be easily be spotted in the stadium because they generally always have blue ballons. This group is bigger in the northern territory and is sponsored by the club and by FedEx[citation needed]

There are also two smaller groups one being "Fortaleza Azul" and "JAH" which stands for "Justicia Amor y Humildad" which means "Justice Love and Humbleness". JAH is a religious based fan group which was founded by seven members of the Jehová es Nuestro Pastor church. JAH say that their trips are paid by God.

SponsorshipEdit

Period Kit manufacturer Main shirt sponsor
1928–86 unknown none
1987–89 Pepsi
1990–92 Castillo Galo
1992–93 TACA
1993–94 Esso Super Oil
1994–95 Banco Ficohsa
1996 Umbro
1997–98 ABA Sport Pepsi
1999–00 Joma
2001 Imperial
2002–present Pepsi

RivalriesEdit

SuperclásicoEdit

El Clasico Capitalino (The Capital's Classic) or Superclásico Hondureño (Honduran Super Classic) is played between Motagua and Club Deportivo Olimpia. Their matches are also known as El Clasico Local (The Local Classic) in Tegucigalpa. There is a huge rivalry between the clubs and their fans; (La Ultra Fiel [of Olimpia] and La Revo [of Motagua]).

Clásico de las M'sEdit

El Clásico de las M's (The M's Classic) or El Derbi de las M's (The M's Derby), is a derby football match played between Motagua from Tegucigalpa and C.D. Marathón from San Pedro Sula, two of the most successful and popular football teams in Honduras.

Motagua–Real EspañaEdit

The Motagua–Real España derby is not as fierce as the other two already mentioned as these both teams have a good relationship with each other from the players, to the board and the fans; however they had played seven intense league finals, four won by Real España and three by Motagua. It is one of the most even all-time series in the league.

Short LivedEdit

One smaller rivalry, which might be called extinct, was against Universidad (also known as UNAH). The club named Universidad, represented the Honduran National Autonomous University in Tegucigalpa, and therefore shared the city with Motagua. This inspired a local derby until UNAH was relocated to Choluteca. UNAH, in various occasions left Motagua out of the play-offs, intensifying the rivalry. This derby can now be called extinct since Universidad were relegated to the Liga de Ascenso. The club was eventually sold to, and renamed, Universidad Pedagogica Nacional-Francisco Morázan (also known as UPNFM) (National Pedagogical University-Francisco Morázan).

AchievementsEdit

Motagua is the second most successful club in Honduras having won 17 domestic leagues since the inauguration of the Honduran Liga Nacional in 1965–66.[5]

→ National level
Winners (17): 1968–69, 1970–71, 1973–74, 1978–79, 1991–92, 1997–98 A, 1997–98 C, 1999–2000 A, 1999–2000 C, 2001–02 A, 2006–07 A, 2010–11 C, 2014–15 A, 2016–17 A, 2016–17 C, 2018–19 A, 2018–19 C
Runners-up (13): 1969–70, 1974–75, 1976–77, 1982–83, 1990–91, 1993–94, 2002–03 C, 2007–08 A, 2009–10 C, 2014–15 C, 2015–16 A, 2017–18 A, 2017–18 C
Winners (1): 1968
Runners-up (4): 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998
Winners (2): 1999, 2017
Winners (2): 1948, 1950–51
Runners-up (2): 1947, 1951–52
→ Regional level
Winners (5): 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1954
→ International level
Runners-up (1): 2018
Winners (1): 2007
Third place (1): 2002

RecordsEdit

Performance by yearEdit

Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1965–66 9th 3–4–11 (14:25) No play-offs Not held Didn't enter
1966–67 9th 5–3–10 (24:31)
1967–68 6th 6–5–7 (22:21) Not held Didn't enter
1968–69 Winners 17–5–5 (45:23) Winners Not held
1969–70 Runner-up 13–9–5 (38:26) Not held First round Didn't enter
1960s record 44–26–38 (143:126) 0–0–0 (0:0)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1970–71 1st 13–11–3 (43:18) Winners 0–1–0 (1:1) Not held Didn't enter
1971–72 3rd 14–5–8 (37:23) No play-offs Not held Didn't enter First round Didn't enter
1972–73 1st 6–3–0 (18:7) 4th Not held Didn't enter
1973–74 Winners 13–13–1 (39:15) Not held
1974–75 1st 18–15–3 (44:19) Finalist 0–2–2 (1:3) Didn't enter Second round Didn't enter
1975–76 2nd 9–14–4 (27:18) Final 4 round 2–4–1 (5:4) First round
1976–77 2nd 13–9–5 (27:12) Finalist 4–2–2 (10:10) Second round
1977–78 4th 11–8–8 (27:21) Final 5 round 3–4–1 (11:9) Didn't enter
1978–79 1st 13–12–2 (34:16) Winners 6–1–3 (17:9)
1979–80 5th 9–9–9 (29:29) Play-off loss 0–0–1 (1:2) Group stage Didn't enter
1970s record 113–96–43 (307:171) 15–14–10 (46:38)
All-time record 157–122–81 (450:297) 15–14–10 (46:38)
Combined record 172–136–91 (496:335)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1980–81 6th 6–15–6 (32:31) Didn't enter Not held Didn't enter
1981–82 2nd 15–8–7 (35:25) Final 5 round 4–3–2 (14:8)
1982–83 2nd 9–13–5 (31:28) Final 5 round 2–5–1 (13:7)
1983–84 6th 14–8–14 (36:36) No play-offs Didn't enter First round Didn't enter
1984–85 5th 11–13–12 (30:33) Didn't enter Didn't enter
1985–86 2nd B 5–9–4 (12:17) Final 4 round 2–2–2 (6:6) Not held Didn't enter
1986–87 3rd B 8–12–7 (27:26) Play-off loss 0–0–1 (3:5) Intermediate round Didn't enter
1987–88 3rd B 9–8–10 (32:37) Didn't enter Didn't enter
1988–89 2nd B 10–12–5 (26:18) Final 5 round 2–4–3 (4:8)
1989–90 2nd B 9–10–8 (29:23) Final 5 round 2–3–3 (5:8)
1980s record 96–108–78 (290:274) 12–17–12 (45:42)
All-time record 253–230–159 (740:571) 27–31–22 (91:80)
Combined record 280–261–181 (831:651)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
1990–91 5th 6–14–7 (26:23) Finalist 5–4–2 (8:5) Not held Didn't enter
1991–92 1st 16–5–6 (38:19) Winners 1–3–6 (4:14) First round Didn't enter
1992–93 5th 10–10–7 (41:34) Final 5 round 2–3–3 (10:13) Group stage Not held Second round
1993–94 4th 7–12–8 (28:27) Final 3 round 2–3–1 (5:4) Finalist Second round
1994–95 2nd 15–9–3 (42:21) Final 6 round 0–0–2 (2:6) Semi-finalist Didn't enter
1995–96 3rd 11–7–9 (36:28) Final 3 round 3–0–3 (8:8) 2nd Not held withdrew First round Didn't enter
1996–97 4th 11–9–7 (37:25) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (3:4) 4th Group stage Didn't enter
1997–98 A 2nd 10–7–3 (23:17) Winners 3–2–1 (8:4) 2nd Didn't enter Group stage
1997–98 C 2nd 14–4–2 (39:15) Winners 3–3–0 (11:6)
1998–99 2nd 7–7–4 (24:20) Semi-finalist 2–0–2 (5:7) 2nd Winners Group stage
1999–2000 A 1st 10–7–1 (39:16) Winners 2–4–0 (6:3) Not held Didn't enter
1999–2000 C 3rd 9–7–2 (26:17) Winners 2–4–0 (8:6)
1990s record 126–98–59 (399:262) 25–27–21 (78:80)
All-time record 379–328–218 (1139:833) 52–58–43 (169:160)
Combined record 431–386–261 (1308:993)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
2000–01 A 2nd 7–8–3 (20:15) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (2:3) Not held Group stage Didn't enter
2000–01 C 7th 2–12–4 (23:27) Final 6 round 0–1–1 (2:3)
2001–02 A 1st 8–8–2 (22:13) Winners 2–0–2 (7:6) Didn't enter
2001–02 C 8th 4–7–7 (12:16) Didn't enter
2002–03 A 5th 7–5–6 (24:23) 3rd First round Didn't enter
2002–03 C 4th 8–4–6 (21:16) Finalist 1–1–2 (5:6)
2003–04 A 5th 7–3–8 (22:22) Didn't enter Didn't enter
2003–04 C 5th 6–5–5 (22:20)
2004–05 A 9th 4–6–8 (20:25)
2004–05 C 5th 4–11–3 (18:18)
2005–06 A 10th 3–5–10 (16:26)
2005–06 C 4th 8–5–5 (24:20) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (3:3)
2006–07 A 2nd 9–4–5 (27:22) Winners 2–1–1 (10:4)
2006–07 C 4th 10–1–7 (31:26) Semi-finalist 0–0–2 (1:4)
2007–08 A 2nd 9–5–4 (28:19) Finalist 1–2–1 (3:3) Winners Quarter-finalist Didn't enter
2007–08 C 4th 8–3–7 (23:19) Semi-finalist 0–0–2 (2:7)
2008–09 A 3rd 9–3–6 (24:21) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (1:1) Not held Didn't enter First round
2008–09 C 8th 4–7–7 (13:21) Didn't enter
2009–10 A 2nd 10–5–3 (31:14) Semi-finalist 1–0–1 (1:2) Didn't enter
2009–10 C 1st 11–3–4 (28:15) Finalist 1–2–1 (4:5)
2000s record 138–110–110 (449:398) 10–8–16 (41:47)
All-time record 517–438–328 (1588:1231) 62–66–59 (210:207)
Combined record 579–504–387 (1798:1438)
Regular season Post season Cup Supercup UNCAF / CFU CONCACAF CONMEBOL
Season Finish Record Finish Record Finish
2010–11 A 7th 5–6–7 (21:25) Didn't enter Not held Preliminary round Didn't enter
2010–11 C 2nd 8–7–3 (25:17) Winners 2–1–1 (8:6)
2011–12 A 7th 6–4–8 (20:19) Didn't enter Group stage
2011–12 C 2nd 7–11–0 (22:10) Semi-finalist 0–1–1 (0:2)
2012–13 A 3rd 6–8–4 (21:15) Semi-finalist 2–2–0 (10:6) Didn't enter
2012–13 C 7th 6–4–8 (27:23) Didn't enter
2013–14 A 9th 5–6–7 (25:27)
2013–14 C 4th 8–5–5 (20:16) Play-off loss 0–1–1 (1:2)
2014–15 A 3rd 8–4–6 (30:25) Winners 4–2–0 (8:4) 3rd Not held
2014–15 C 2nd 11–4–3 (37:21) Finalist 1–1–2 (4:3)
2015–16 A 2nd 9–5–4 (41:25) Finalist 0–4–0 (6:6) Quarter-finalist abandoned Not held Group stage Didn't enter
2015–16 C 4th 9–3–6 (28:22) Semi-finalist 1–1–2 (3:3)
2016–17 A 4th 7–7–4 (30:24) Winners 3–2–1 (7:5) Round of 64 Didn't enter Didn't enter
2016–17 C 2nd 9–7–2 (35:21) Winners 3–1–0 (11:4)
2017–18 A 2nd 9–6–3 (31:21) Finalist 2–0–2 (5:6) Not held Winners Didn't enter Round of 16
2017–18 C 2nd 10–4–4 (29:17) Finalist 0–4–0 (2:2)
2018–19 A 1st 11–4–3 (28:11) Winners 3–0–1 (6:2) Round of 64 Didn't enter Finalist Didn't enter
2018–19 C 3rd 9–4–5 (29:15) Winners 3–3–0 (10:4)
2010s record 143–99–82 (499:354) 24–23–11 (81:55)
All-time record 660–537–410 (2087:1585) 86–89–70 (291:262)
Combined record 746–626–480 (2378:1847)

International performanceEdit

Season Record Finish
UNCAF
1979 2–3–5 (10:16) Group stage
1996 0–0–0 (0:0) Withdrew
1997 1–4–1 (8:8) Group stage
1998 0–5–1 (2:3) Group stage
1999 1–4–2 (4:6) Group stage
2001 0–1–2 (1:3) Group stage
2002 3–1–2 (10:11) 3rd
2007 7–1–0 (15:5) Winners
All-time record 14–19–13 (50:52)
CONCACAF
1969 0–1–1 (1:5) First round
1971 0–0–2 (0:5) First round
1974 2–1–1 (3:4) Second round
1975 1–0–1 (2:3) First round
1977 0–0–0 (0:0) Second round
1983 1–0–1 (3:4) First round
1986 3–1–2 (10:9) Intermediate round
1991 0–2–1 (2:3) First round
1992 1–1–2 (3:6) Second round
1993 2–0–2 (8:3) Second round
1995 0–0–2 (0:4) First round
2001 0–1–1 (1:5) First round
2003 0–1–1 (2:3) First round
2008 0–1–1 (0:1) Quarter-finals
2010–11 0–1–1 (2:3) Preliminary round
2011–12 1–0–7 (6:16) Group stage
2015–16 2–1–1 (5:6) Group stage
2018 (CCL) 0–1–1 (1:2) Round of 16
2018 (CL) 6–0–2 (13:7) Runners-up
2019 TBD TBD
All-time record 19–11–31 (61:89)
CONMEBOL
2008 0–0–2 (1:6) First round
All-time record 0–0–2 (1:6)
Combined record 33–31–45 (113:147)

League recordsEdit

  • As of 2018–19 Clausura
  • Click show for more details

All time top scorersEdit

  • As of 2018–19 Clausura
No. Player Goals
1   Román Castillo 84
2   Ángel Obando 77
3   Amado Guevara 72[6]
4   Óscar Hernández 59
5   Luis Reyes 54
6   Jairo Martínez 53
7   Carlos Discua 52
8   Mario Blandón 48
9   Geovanny Castro 40
10   Georgie Welcome 39

All-time record vs. opponentsEdit

Domestic levelEdit

International levelEdit

  • As of 2 October 2019
Opponent First meeting Last Meeting Pld W D L GF GA GD
  Alajuelense 25 Apr 1992 29 Sep 2011 6 0 1 5 5 16 −11
  Alianza 1979 3 Apr 1997 4 0 3 1 5 6 −1
  América 5 Aug 2015 20 Oct 2015 2 0 1 1 1 5 −4
  Árabe Unido 18 Dec 2002 18 Dec 2002 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
  Arsenal 19 Aug 2008 4 Sep 2008 2 0 0 2 1 6 −5
  Atlético Marte 4 May 1986 18 May 1986 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2
  Aurora 1979 20 Nov 1997 3 0 1 2 3 6 −3
  Belmopan Bandits 31 Jul 2018 7 Aug 2018 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3
  Cartaginés 5 May 1974 19 May 1974 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3
  Comunicaciones 27 Jul 1986 20 Dec 2002 15 4 9 2 15 15 0
  Herediano 4 May 1975 1 Nov 2018 4 2 0 2 4 6 −2
  Juventus 26 Jun 1993 18 Jul 1999 4 2 2 0 9 2 +7
  LA Galaxy 16 Mar 2003 20 Oct 2011 4 0 1 3 2 6 −4
  Luis Ángel Firpo 24 Feb 1999 25 Jul 1999 2 1 0 1 2 2 0
  Managua 20 Aug 2019 27 Aug 2019 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1
  Marathón 1 Nov 2002 1 Nov 2002 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
  Morelia 25 Aug 2011 22 Sep 2011 2 0 0 2 0 6 −6
  Municipal 21 Jun 1974 4 Aug 2011 10 4 2 4 11 11 0
  NY Pancyprian-Freedoms 10 Apr 1983 26 Apr 1983 2 1 0 1 3 4 −1
  Olimpia 11 Feb 1979 1979 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1
  Pachuca 11 Mar 2008 19 Mar 2008 2 0 1 1 0 1 −1
  Pembroke Hamilton 31 Aug 1986 6 Sep 1986 2 1 0 1 3 5 −2
  Portmore United 23 Aug 2018 30 Aug 2018 2 2 0 0 5 2 +3
  Real España 29 Nov 1997 29 Nov 1997 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
  Real Estelí 7 Aug 2007 16 Aug 2007 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4
  San Francisco 18 Sep 2007 26 Sep 2007 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2
  Santiagueño 1979 1979 2 0 0 2 2 6 −4
  Saprissa 25 Apr 1969 5 Dec 2007 15 1 5 9 7 24 −17
  Tauro 17 Aug 2001 27 Sep 2018 4 2 0 2 5 4 +1
  Tijuana 21 Feb 2018 27 Feb 2018 2 0 1 1 1 2 −1
  Toronto 27 Jul 2010 3 Aug 2010 2 0 1 1 2 3 −1
  Walter Ferretti 27 Aug 2015 24 Sep 2015 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3
  Waterhouse 25 Sep 2019 2 Oct 2019 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2
Totals 112 35 32 45 117 148 –31
  • Friendly matches not included.
  • Games decided by penalty shootout are counted as ties.

Current seasonEdit

SquadEdit

First-team squadEdit

As of June 2019

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1   GK Hugo Caballero
2   DF Juan Montes
4   DF Sergio Peña
5   DF Marcelo Pereira
6   MF Reinieri Mayorquín
7   FW Erick Andino
8   MF Walter Martínez
10   MF Matías Galvaliz
11   FW Marco Vega
12   DF Raúl Santos
14   DF Klifox Bernárdez
16   MF Héctor Castellanos
17   DF Denil Maldonado
18   DF Wilmer Crisanto
19   GK Jonathan Rougier
No. Position Player
21   FW Roberto Moreira
22   FW Marcelo Estigarribia
24   DF Omar Elvir
25   GK Marlon Licona
26   DF Harrinson Bernárdez
27   MF Stanley Turcios
28   FW Josué Villafranca
29   GK Edgardo Meléndez
30   MF Marvin Ávila
31   MF Carlos Sánchez
32   MF Jonathan Núñez
34   FW Kevin López
35   DF Cristopher Meléndez
54   DF Éverson López
  MF Óscar Salas

Current technical staffEdit

Executive President   Eduardo Atala
Financial President   Juan Carlos Suazo
Director of Football   Marvin Fonseca
Public Relations and Social Media Manager   Walter Araujo
Commercial and Marketing Manager   Luis Brevé
Administration and Finances Manager   Fabián Ordoñez

Retired numbersEdit

16 –   Edy Vásquez, retired for 2 years (2007–09) in memorian of Edy Vásquez's death.

20 –   Amado Guevara, retired.

Former presidentsEdit

  • Marco Antonio Rosa
  • Edgardo Zúniga
  • Manuel Cáceres
  • Celestino Cáceres
  • Gonzalo Carías
  • César Romero
  • Antonio Urquía
  • Juda Guzmán
  • Silverio Henríquez
  • Lurio Martínez
  • Carlos Arriaga
  • Carlos Amador
  • Carlos Cruz
  • Mario Rivera López
  • Joaquín González
  • Octasiano Valerio
  • Horacio Fortín
  • Saturnino Vidaurreta
  • Heriberto Gómez
  • Tulio Bueso
  • Fausto Flores
  • Gustavo Adolfo Alvarado
  • Pedro Atala Simón
  • Salvador Lamas
  • Juan Ángel Arias
  • Cristóbal Simón
  • Francisco Zepeda
  • Leónidas Rosa Bautista
  • Jorge Abudoj
  • Eduardo Atala
  • Marco Tulio Gutiérrez
  • Javier Atala
  • Pedro Atala
  • Julio Gutiérrez (current)

Former managersEdit

Notable former playersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "¡Sorpresa! El Motagua modifica su nombre". La Prensa. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  2. ^ http://www.elsalvador.com/deportes/futbol/369451/reducen-sancion-y-multa-al-motagua-por-muerte-de-hinchas/
  3. ^ Motagua.com – MOTAGUA UN SENTIMIENTO ENTRE EL PUEBLO Archived 19 April 2012 at the Wayback Machine – 14 April 2012
  4. ^ LaPrensa.hn – Desafíe a Ismael – 7 September 2011
  5. ^ www.CICLONHN.com / futmun : Motagua Archived 8 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Amado cerca de ser el máximo goleador azul – La Prensa (in Spanish)

External linksEdit