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Exhibition of the centenary of the opening of the Ports of Brazil

The national commemorative Exhibition of the centenary of the opening of the Ports of Brazil along with marking a hundred years since the opening of the Brazilian ports celebrated Brazil's trade and development.[3] It was opened on in Urca in Rio de Janeiro on 11 August,[4] stayed open for 3 months and received over 1 million visitors.[3]

1908 Rio de Janeiro
Diploma Exposição Nacional de 1908 Centenário Abertura dos Portos - Rio de Janeiro a José Mentor Guilherme de Mello.jpg
Diploma from the exhibtion awarded to José Mentor Guilherme de Mello
Overview
BIE-class Unrecognized exposition
Name Exposição Nacional
Building The pavilion of states building, now Museum of Earth Sciences (pt)
Area 182,000 square metres (18.2 ha)
Visitors More than 1 million paying
Organized by Antônio Olinto dos Santos Pires, director[1] and Augusto Ramos (pt) general co-ordinator[2]
Participant(s)
Countries 2
Location
Country Brazil
City Rio de Janeiro
Venue Urca
Coordinates 22°57′11″S 43°10′05″W / 22.95306°S 43.16806°W / -22.95306; -43.16806
Timeline
Opening 11 August 1908
Closure 15 November 1908

Contents

OpeningEdit

The fair was opened (a month later than planned,[5]) by the president Afonso Pena.[6] On arrival he was escorted from Catete Palace to the opening gate by lancers from the 9th cavalry, and then escorted by the exhibition's commissioners to the central palace, during this canons were fired and the national hymn was played.[6]

LocationEdit

The 41 person executive committee considered several locations in Rio de Janeiro, before selecting a 182,000 m2 site between Praia da Saudade and Praia Vermelha in Urca.[7]

The main entrance was through a hundred foot high[8] illuminated gateway designed by René Barba.[7]

PavilionsEdit

There were pavilions from Brazilian states of Bahia, São Paulo, Santa Catarina, Minas Gerais and the Federal District, along with a Portugal pavilion and ones for industry, Post and Telegraph, the Fire Department, a theater[3] and a music pavilion.[9]

Bahaia state pavilionEdit

The Bahia state pavilion, which occupied 54,359 square feet[5] was designed by Italian architect Rafael Rebecchi.[10] Its displays included artwork by Jose Rodrigues Nunes, Bento Capinam, Macario, and Victor Meirelles, and its external sculpture was by Rodolfo Bernardelli (pt).[10]

Minas Geraes state pavilionEdit

The Minas Geraes was also designed by Rafael Rebecchi. It had interior murals by Crispim do Amaral (pt) including a series personifying agriculture, mineralogy, manufactures and the liberal arts. Exhibits included aspects of gold and diamond mining including a small quartz crushing machine and gold-washing machinery with washers and miners demonstrating the processes involved. [11]

São Paulo state pavilionEdit

The São Paulo state pavilion was designed by Ramos de Azevedo.[12] Its commissioners were Carlos Botelho and Antonio Barros Barreto, and it covered about twenty thousand square feet.[13]

Portugal pavilionEdit

The Portugal pavilion building was provided by Brazil, designed by Francisco Isidro Monteiro was inspired by the southern face of the Jerónimos Monastery.[14]

Industry pavilionEdit

A military college on the site was converted to the industry pavilion for the expo (and afterwards was used by the 3rd infantry regiment).[15]

States pavilionEdit

This permanent building was built for the exhibition, and is now the Museum of Earth Sciences (pt).[16][17]

Bangu factory buildingEdit

The Bangu factory (pt) displayed its own woven materials.[18]

Music pavilionEdit

The music pavilion was designed by Jorge Lossio, decorated by Benedito Calixto and intended to have an Egyptian appearance.[9]

Gallery of pavilionsEdit

Other contentsEdit

There was a skating rink,[9] a Botanical Garden, fountains, gardens and a small railroad for the public.[3]

Botanic gardenEdit

The botanic garden was stocked by the Rio de Janeiro Botanical Garden and contained Brazilian flora, including palms, orchids and Amazon parasites, the Victoria Regia, Laelias, Sophonites, Epidendrums and hundreds of roses. It included a conservatory, lay between the Bahia and Santa Catharina pavilions and received 1000 visitors a day.[19]

 
Potcard showing the botanic garden in the foreground

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. p. 32.
  2. ^ "The cable car | Bondinho - Sugarloaf". Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d "Exposição Nacional de 1908 na Urca | Alberto de Sampaio" (in Portuguese). Retrieved 29 September 2017.
  4. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons.
  5. ^ a b Ward, Robert (February 1909). "THE NATIONAL EXPOSITION AT RIO DE JANEIRO". The Popular Science Monthly. Harvard University.
  6. ^ a b Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. p. 30.
  7. ^ a b Delacerda, André; Fagundes, Diogo (22 April 2015). "Rio Antigo: Exposição Nacional de 1908 na Urca | Cidade do Rio" (in Portuguese). Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  8. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. pp. 23–24.
  9. ^ a b c Ramos, Renato (2011). "O Pavilhão da Música da Exposição Nacional de 1908" (in Portuguese): 199–209.
  10. ^ a b Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. pp. 136–140.
  11. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. pp. 130–136.
  12. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. p. 51.
  13. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. p. 123.
  14. ^ Rodrigues, Paulo (2012). "THE SCIENCE OF ARCHITECTURE REPRESENTATIONS OF PORTUGUESE NATIONAL ARCHITECTURE IN THE 19TH CENTURY WORLD EXHIBITIONS: ARCHETYPES, MODELS AND IMAGES". Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria. 13.
  15. ^ "Curiosidades Cariocas: Exposição 1908 - Palácio das Indústrias" (in Portuguese). Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  16. ^ "Curiosidades Cariocas: Expo 1908 (Palácio dos Estados)" (in Portuguese). Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  17. ^ "21st World Congress of Soil Science (WCSS)". Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  18. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. pp. 160–161.
  19. ^ Wright, Marie. The Brazilian national exposition of 1908 in celebration of the centenary of the opening of Brazilian ports to the commerce of the world by the Prince Regent Dom João VI. of Portugal, in 1808. Philadelphia, G. Barrie & sons. pp. 147–150.

External linksEdit