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The Eurovision Asia Song Contest is a proposed Asia-Pacific counterpart of the Eurovision Song Contest. The inaugural contest is, as of August 2019, in development by Australian broadcaster Special Broadcasting Service and production partner Blink TV, in co-operation with the European Broadcasting Union.

Eurovision Asia Song Contest
GenreSong contest
Based onEurovision Song Contest
Original language(s)English
No. of episodes0 contests
Production company(s)
DistributorEurovision
Chronology
Related showsEurovision Song Contest (1956–present)
External links
Official website
Production website

Contents

DevelopmentEdit

In March 2016, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) penned an agreement with Australian broadcaster Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) to create a version of the EBU's Eurovision Song Contest, which had been held since 1956, open for countries in the Asia-Pacific region.[1] SBS picked up development of the contest with its production partner Blink TV.[2] The inaugural contest, which had yet to be given a name, was to be held in Australia in 2017.[2] The show was formally announced under the name "Eurovision Asia Song Contest" (or "Eurovision Asia" for short) in August 2017.[3] The inaugural Eurovision Asia Song Contest was postponed several times, partially due to political challenges, and remains in development as of August 2019.[4][5][6]

Inaugural contestEdit

By May 2017, Australia, Hong Kong, and Singapore had signaled their bid to host the inaugural Eurovision Asia Song Contest, of which Singapore and Australia's city of Sydney and state of New South Wales were willing to fund the event.[7] Singapore has said it will spend $4 million to host the contest. The city of Sydney and New South Wales have both indicated that they will commit big funds. Hong Kong has also “made a play” towards hosting this contest.[8] According to a report from the city council of the Gold Coast, Queensland, reviewed in November 2018, the inaugural show is to be held at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre from November 30, 2019, to December 7, 2019.[9] However, this report has been refuted.[6]

ParticipationEdit

As of May 2016, SBS plans to allow any Asian nation to compete, which would make as many as sixty-eight countries eligible to participate.[10] Membership in the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union is not a prerequisite for participation.[11] As of March 2019, 10 countries have confirmed their intent to participate: Australia, China, Japan, Kazakhstan, Maldives, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, South Korea, and Vanuatu.[12] Australia has confirmed its participation, while China, Japan, and South Korea were named as potential members of the contest's steering group.[12]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Granger, Anthony (21 March 2016). "Asia: SBS to create Eurovision Song Contest in Asia". Eurovoix. Archived from the original on 21 March 2016. Retrieved 22 March 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  2. ^ a b Jordan, Paul (21 March 2016). "Eurovision Song Contest concept to be developed in Asia!". Eurovision.tv. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 19 August 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. ^ Jordan, Paul (18 August 2017). "The Greatest Song Contest in the World is coming to Asia!". Eurovision.tv. Archived from the original on 18 August 2017. Retrieved 19 August 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ Granger, Anthony (19 May 2017). "Three cities interested in hosting Eurovision Asia". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on 5 August 2017. Retrieved 19 May 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ Cobb, Ryan (13 July 2018). "Eurovision Asia on hold? Organisers and EBU "still early in the development process"". ESCXtra. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 13 July 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ a b Gallagher, Robyn (14 August 2019). "SBS: The Eurovision Asia Song Contest is "still in development, no update at this stage"". Wiwibloggs.
  7. ^ Granger, Anthony (19 May 2017). "Three cities interested in hosting Eurovision Asia". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on 5 August 2017. Retrieved 19 May 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. ^ Spence, Ewan (6 May 2017). "Eurovision Insight Podcast: Insight Asks Australian Head Of Delegation Paul Clarke". ESC Insight. Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  9. ^ Wolf, Brendon (1 November 2018). "Gold Coast to host inaugural Eurovision Asia". 9News. Retrieved 1 November 2018.
  10. ^ Granger, Anthony (7 May 2016). "Asiavision 12 countries the aim for the first contest". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on 7 May 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  11. ^ Adams, William Lee (28 August 2017). "Eurovision Asia: Full membership in the ABU is NOT required to participate in the song contest". Wiwibloggs. Archived from the original on 29 August 2017. Retrieved 28 August 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. ^ a b Granger, Anthony (4 March 2019). "Eurovision Asia Song Contest Still in The Works". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on 20 March 2019. Retrieved 18 August 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)

External linksEdit