European Union Prize for Literature

European Union Prize for Literature (established in 2009) is a European Union literary award. The award is funded and founded by the Culture Programme of the European Union, and is coordinated by a Consortium, selected by a Commission.[1] The Consortium is composed of the European Booksellers Federation, the European Writers' Council and the Federation of European Publishers.[1] The Consortium sets up the national juries and organizes the awards.

European Union Prize for Literature
Country European Union
Presented byEUPL Consortium: European and International Booksellers Federation (EIBF), European Writers' Council (EWC), Federation of European Publishers (FEP)
First awarded2009; 12 years ago (2009)
Websitewww.euprizeliterature.eu

Each year 11 or 12 countries are selected to be part of the award, national juries are selected for each country, and each country's jury then selects a winner.[1] After three years of rotation, all countries will have been included. Countries eligible for inclusion include:[1]

  • The 28 Member States of the European Union (as of 2013)
  • The 3 EEA countries: Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein
  • The candidate countries for accession to the EU: Albania, Turkey, Montenegro, the Republic of Macedonia, Serbia
  • Potential candidate country for accession to the EU: Bosnia and Herzegovina

Each winner receives €5,000 and their books are given support for translation funding, as well as promotion.[1]

WinnersEdit

2009Edit

Winners for 2009 were announced November 2009.[1]

2010Edit

Winners for 2010 were announced 18 November 2010.[1][2]

2011Edit

Winners for 2011 were announced 11 October 2011.[3][4]

2012Edit

The awards ceremony was in Brussels on 22 October 2012.[5]

2013Edit

The winners were announced on 26 September 2013. The ceremony was in Brussels on 26 November 2013.[6][7]

2014Edit

The winners were announced on 8 October 2014 at the Frankfurt Book Fair.[8]

2015Edit

The winners were announced in April 2015, at the opening ceremony of the London Book Fair by Tibor Navracsics, European Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport.[9]

2016Edit

The winners were announced in April 2016 at the European Commission.[10]

2017Edit

The winners were announced 21 April 2017.[11]

2019Edit

The winners were announced 24 May 2019.[25]

2020Edit

The winners were announced 19 May 2020.[26]

TranslationsEdit

The European Union promotes the transnational circulation of literature and its diversity in Europe and beyond.[27] The list below shows some translations available in English language:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g European Union Prize for Literature, official website
  2. ^ "Winners of 2010 EU Prize for Literature honoured at award ceremony." European Union News 22 Nov. 2010. Infotrac Newsstand. Retrieved 11 Oct. 2012.
  3. ^ "Winners of the 2011 European Union Prize for Literature". Euprizeliterature.eu. 11 October 2011. Archived from the original on 1 March 2014. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  4. ^ "Winners of the 2011 European Union Prize for literature." European Union News 11 Oct. 2011. General OneFile. Retrieved 11 Oct. 2012.
  5. ^ "EU Prize for Literature picks 12-to-read". Euronews. 9 October 2012. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  6. ^ Elana Ralli (26 September 2013). "Announcing the winners of the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature". New Europe. Archived from the original on 28 March 2016. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  7. ^ Staff writer (26 September 2013). "Winners of 2013 European Union Prize for Literature announced at Göteborg Book Fair". EU Reporter Magazine. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  8. ^ European Commission. "Winners of 2014 European Union Prize for Literature announced at Frankfurt Book Fair - Press Release". Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  9. ^ "European Union Prize for Literature 2015 winners announced at London Book Fair". European Commission. April 2015. Retrieved 20 April 2015.
  10. ^ "2016 EU Prize for Literature winners announced". ec.europa.eu. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  11. ^ "Announcement of winners of the 2017 European Union Prize for Literature". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  12. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Rudi Erebara". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  13. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Ina Vultchanova". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  14. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Bianca Bellová". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  15. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Kallia Papadaki". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Halldóra K. Thoroddsen". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  17. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Osvalds Zebris". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  18. ^ "Writer wins EU Prize for Literature". eng.lsm.lv. 21 April 2016. Retrieved 25 April 2017.
  19. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Walid Nabhan". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  20. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Aleksandar Bečanović". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  21. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Jamal Ouariachi". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  22. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Darko Tuševljaković". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  23. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Sine Ergün". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  24. ^ "Winning Authors 2017: Sunjeev Sahota". ec.europa.eu. 21 April 2017. Archived from the original on 23 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  25. ^ "Winners of the 2019 EU Prize for Literature announced". PenNews. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  26. ^ "European Union Prize For Literature announces 2020 laureates". Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  27. ^ "Creative Europe | EU Prize for Literature". www.euprizeliterature.eu.

External linksEdit