Estadio Revolución

Estadio de la Revolución is a sports arena located near the downtown area of Torreón in Coahuila, Mexico.[1] It has a seating capacity of 9,500.[3] Though used mainly for baseball games, it sometimes hosts concerts and other non-sport events.[1] It is the home field of the Algodoneros de Unión Laguna baseball team, and as such, it is the oldest professional baseball field in Mexico still in function.[1] Since it was originally constructed as a multi sport stadium and featured a running track the Estadio de la Revolución features the largest foul territory of any ball park within the Mexican League, the area of the former running track.[1] The stadium is named to commemorate the Mexican Revolution of 1910–1920, a political change that was still recent at the time of the venue's opening on 15 September 1932.[1] The stadium was renovated in the fall of 2002 to provide a refurbished appearance for the baseball team's reorganization, renaming, and new season starting in 2003.[2]

Estadio de la Revolución
photo of main entrance with band and cheerleaders
Estadio de la Revolución in 2009
LocationSports Nazario S. Ortiz Garza
Torreón, Coahuila, Mexico
Coordinates25°32′22.47″N 103°25′45.04″W / 25.5395750°N 103.4291778°W / 25.5395750; -103.4291778Coordinates: 25°32′22.47″N 103°25′45.04″W / 25.5395750°N 103.4291778°W / 25.5395750; -103.4291778
Capacity9,500[3]
Field sizeLeft Field: 333 feet (101 m)
Center Field: 400 feet (120 m)
Right Field: 333 feet (101 m)
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Opened15 September 1932[1]
RenovatedFall 2002[2]
Tenants
Algodoneros de Unión Laguna (1940–2002)
Vaqueros Laguna (2003–2017)
Algodoneros de Unión Laguna (2018–present)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Sitio Oficial Vaqueros Laguna - Vive ser un Vaquero" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2011-02-07. Retrieved 2011-06-19.
  2. ^ a b "Remodelación completa en el Estadio de la Revolución". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish). 12 February 2003. Retrieved 2011-06-24.
  3. ^ a b "World Stadiums - Stadiums in Mexico :: Northern Mexico". Archived from the original on 2011-06-05. Retrieved 2011-06-23.