Enannatum I (Sumerian: 𒂗𒀭𒈾𒁺, EN.AN.NA-tum2), son of Akurgal, succeeded his brother E-anna-tum as Ensi (ruler, king) of Lagash.[2] During his rule, Umma once more asserted independence under its ensi Ur-Lumma, who attacked Lagash unsuccessfully. After several battles, En-an-na-túm I finally defeated Ur-Lumma.[2] Ur-Lumma was replaced by a priest-king, Illi, who also attacked Lagash.

Enannatum I
𒂗𒀭𒈾𒁺
King of Lagash
Stone plaque depicting Enannatum I, king of Lagash Early Dynastic III 2424-2405 BCE from Girsu.jpg
The inscription "Enannatum, Ensi of Lagash" (𒂗𒀭𒈾𒁺 𒑐𒋼𒋛 𒉢𒁓𒆷𒆠) is located before the profile of Enannatum, vertically. Detail of a stone plaque. Circa 2420 BCE. From Girsu, Iraq. The British Museum, London.[1]
Reignc. 2450  BC
PredecessorEannatum
SuccessorEntemena
Dynasty1st Dynasty of Lagash
En-anna-tum I was king of Lagash, circa 2400 BC.

Enannatum had a son named Meannesi, who is known for dedicating a statue for the life of his father and mother.[3][4] He has two other sons, Lummatur, and Entemena, the latter succeeding him to the throne.[2] His wife was named Ashumen.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "CDLI-Archival View". cdli.ucla.edu.
  2. ^ a b c d "Enanatum I". Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative. Oxford University.
  3. ^ Bahrani, Zainab (2013). Women of Babylon: Gender and Representation in Mesopotamia. Routledge. p. 100. ISBN 978-1-134-60140-0.
  4. ^ "Statue of Meannesi". cdli.ucla.edu.
  5. ^ Sarzec, Ernest (1896). Découvertes en Chaldée... L. Heuzey. p. Plate XLVI.
  6. ^ Sarzec, Ernest (1896). Découvertes en Chaldée... L. Heuzey. p. Plate XLVI.
  7. ^ Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2003. pp. 75–76. ISBN 978-1-58839-043-1.
  8. ^ Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2003. pp. 75–76. ISBN 978-1-58839-043-1.
Regnal titles
Preceded by King of Lagash
ca. 25th century BCE
Succeeded by