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Panel from Green Lantern (vol. 4) #25, with seven batteries fueled by lights of the emotional spectrum

The emotional spectrum is a fictional concept in comic books published by DC Comics, especially the Green Lantern titles. The colors of the emotional spectrum are harnessed as power sources by organizations with power rings.

Contents

OverviewEdit

ColorsEdit

The emotional spectrum is divided into the seven colors of the rainbow, with each color corresponding to an emotion: rage (red), greed (orange), fear (yellow), willpower (green), hope (blue), compassion (indigo), and love (violet). The absence of color (black) is death, and the combination of colors (white) is life.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The two emotions at the ends of the emotional spectrum, rage and love, have a stronger influence over their users[7] and willpower (at the center of the spectrum) can be used to overcome and control one's emotions.[6] All Power Rings and Lantern Batteries can be traced back to Volthoom's Travel Lantern which in turn led the Guardians to create The Great Heart lantern which spawned the First Ring also used by Volthoom to become the First Lantern. To defeat Volthoom the First Seven Green Lantern rings were made, which ultimately helped create all future Corps Rings. Groups embodying points on the emotional spectrum are:

  • Black Lantern Corps: An army of zombies formed by the former Guardian Scar and led by Lord of the Undead Nekron, the Black Lanterns are dead people resurrected by a black power ring fueled by death. Members of the corps, chosen for their emotional connection to living people, rise to elicit emotion from those people.[8] The power ring enables its wearer to create things made of black light, mimicking powers their users had while alive, and read the emotions of living beings as colors of the emotional spectrum.[9]
  • Red Lantern Corps: A group of berserkers formed and led by Atrocitus,[2] the Red Lanterns draw on rage to generate constructs made of red light with their power rings.[1][2][6] When they are inducted into the Corps, a member's blood is replaced with liquid fire; members of the corps can expel this substance from their body at will like napalm, causing burns. During induction, their heart is replaced with the ring, so if the ring is taken off (unlike in the cartoon series), the wearer will die.[2] These lantern corps are antiheroes. Their home planet is Ysmault.
  • Agent Orange: Former Thieves Guild member Larfleeze (known as Agent Orange) draws on greed to generate constructs (transformed from those he killed) made of orange light with his power ring.[10] This Lantern is also considered evil or enemy of good lanterns.[11]
  • Sinestro Corps: A group of terrorists formed and led by former Green Lantern Thaal Sinestro, the Sinestro Lanterns draw on fear to generate constructs (based on a target's fears) made of yellow light with their power rings. These corps are evil and are the enemy of the Green Lantern Corps.[12][13] Their home planet is Qward, where Sinestro first discovered that Green Lanterns were weak against the color yellow.
  • Green Lantern Corps: A group of peacekeepers formed by the Guardians of the Universe, the Green Lanterns draw on willpower to generate constructs made of green light.[14] Their home planet is Oa.
  • Blue Lantern Corps: A faithful group formed by former Guardians Ganthet and Sayd and led by Saint Walker, the Blue Lanterns draw on hope to generate constructs made of blue light with their power rings.[7] The full extent of Blue Lanterns' abilities can only be unlocked with a green power ring, as hope is almost useless without the willpower to use it.[5][15] In turn, a blue ring can recharge a depleted green ring, and supercharge a full one.[15] A Blue Lantern can also "save" a Red Lantern from their ring. Their home planet is Odym.
  • Indigo Tribe: A group of nomads formed by deceased Green Lantern Abin Sur and led by Indigo-1, the Indigo Lanterns draw on compassion to teleport long distances and generate constructs of indigo light with their power rings.[16] They are non-aggressive, and are allies to the Green, Blue, and Violet Lanterns.[17]
  • Star Sapphire Corps: A group of female warriors formed and led by the Zamarons, the Star Sapphires draw on love to generate constructs made of violet light with their power rings. Although the character Star Sapphire was originally a villain, the Star Sapphire Corps is depicted as a force for good.[18] Their constructs are violet crystals, seeking love in their target's heart and bombarding it with love until they are freed or join the corps.[19] Their home planet is Zamaron.
  • White Lantern Corps: Formed by Sinestro during the "Blackest Night" storyline, the White Lanterns use life to create constructs made of white light. Corps members, "nothing short of godlike",[20] have reality-altering powers able to defeat Nekron and the Black Lantern Corps. The White Lantern Corps disbanded soon after this, as the Life Entity vanished. Later Kyle Rayner would be able to master all seven colors of the Emotional Electromagnetic Spectrum, creating the white light and becoming a White Lantern.

It has been revealed that one different power ring was created by a renegade Guardian of the Universe that allow any user to harness any color of the emotional spectrum, which is:

  • Phantom Lantern: created by Rami, which nicknamed it as the Phantom Ring, was taken by Frank Laminski, who became the Phantom Lantern under the guidance of Volthoom. The user of this ring is, based on the particular emotion the ring-bearer feels at a given moment, allowed to harness any color of the spectrum, despite their actual ability to wield one of the Power Rings on its own, however, those who don the ring may suffer some damaging effect, as Volthoom refuses to wear the ring himself.[21] It is revealed that the ring uses the body of those who don it as a battery which eventually overloads with power and become a living bomb.[22] Frank is saved from death by Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz when they made him feel compassion which forced him to become an Indigo Tribe member and see the wrongs he was doing as the Phantom Lantern and so he removes the ring himself, losing in the process the memories of doing so.[23]

There is also another non-canon ring from the Planet of the Apes crossover:

  • Universal Corps: Created by those less gifted than Rami by using in conjunction sorcery and science, they were able to forge the Universal Ring which allow the user to tap directly into the energies of the emotional spectrum, and harness any color of it, despite whatever emotion is being felt regardless of intentions. This ring can also drain the other rings of the energies that powers them, rendering them useless. However the Guardians of the Universe would eventually discover that user of the ring will eventually succumb to its corrupted power and forced to create more rings of itself. As they were unable to destroy it, they sent it away, to a version of Earth locked in a time loop, therefore isolating it from the rest of Hypertime, hoping that it could never be found.[24]

BooksEdit

Also referred as the Books of Light, are mystical books connected to the emotional spectrum which possessed on its revered pages all the knowledge of those who tap into the colors of the emotional spectrum. The books in their original form are massive however they can shrink to the size of a normal book so it can be better used and while at first glance doesn't have any power to give, except the power of knowledge, several books appears to have a conscience of their own.[25]

The Book of Oa contains the history of the Guardians of the Universe and the Green Lantern Corps. One member of the Green Lantern Corps is selected by the Guardians as Keeper of the Book of Oa.[26]

The Book of Parallax contains the knowledge and history of the Sinestro Corps. A power ring is needed to translate the Book's text.[27] According to Lyssa Drak, former keeper of the Book of Parallax and chronicler of the Sinestro Corps, the book was at some point destroyed, although she was able to ink on her body all the prophecies inside the tome.[28]

The Book of the Black, also known as The Ultimate Facilitator of The Blackest Night and written in black blood, contains prophecies about the rise of the Black Lantern Corps and the forbidden history of the Guardians of the Universe.[29]

The Book of Rage, with fables of revenge attributed to the Red Lantern Corps, it is first mentioned by Lyssa Drak when she is questioned by the Guardians of the Universe about the location of the Book of The Black.[30]

The Book of Greed, mainly referred to as "The Book", is a large tome created by the user of the orange light, in this case Larfleeze, sometime after the War of The Green Lanterns. Larfleeze's avarice prompted him to desire a tome similar to the Book of Oa that was owned by the Guardians of the Universe. The tome should contain the exploits of the Orange Lanterns. Larfleeze kidnaps a green-skinned alien by the name of Stargrave to be his chronicler, but because he is completely consumed by greed, the book is almost blank because knowledge is something Larfleeze jealously guards as a possession and is the reason why he does not reveal many secrets within the book, despite the scribes' directions.[31]

OthersEdit

HaloEdit

A gestalt of a human woman (Violet Harper) and an Aurakle (an ancient energy being resembling a sphere of iridescent color), Halo can create auras in the colors of the emotional spectrum around herself. Each aura gives her a different power.[32] In the "Blackest Night" storyline, Halo destroys Black Lanterns and their rings, feats usually reserved for the Lantern Corps and users of the Dove power.[33]

Rainbow GirlEdit

In Adventure Comics, Rainbow Girl (Dori Aandraison from Xolnar) wields the powers of the emotional spectrum (resulting in unpredictable mood swings). She taps into red, blue and green energies when she and other members of the Legion of Substitute Heroes aid Superman and the Legion of Super-Heroes in their battle with the Justice League of Earth.[34] Rainbow Girl creates a pheromone field, surrounding her in a sparkling light resembling a rainbow and giving her an irresistible personality.[35] In an interview, Geoff Johns said she does not understand her powers and uses them for fun.[36]

DoveEdit

As revealed during the "Blackest Night" storyline, those who are chosen to become Dove, and avatars of Lord of Order, also become connected to the White Light of Creation, a power believed to be created by the combined seven powers of the emotional spectrum.[37] This is the reason why the black rings cannot reanimate the body of Don Hall, and Dawn Granger can destroy Black Lanterns, and block a Black Lantern's aura-reading power with her very presence.[volume & issue needed]

Emotional entitiesEdit

Emotional entities are creatures in the DC Universe which embody the emotional spectrum.[38] According to Geoff Johns, all the corps have associated entities. By Green Lantern (vol. 4) #54 (July 2010), all seven entities were revealed. Although the Black Lantern Corps are powered by death, in Green Lantern its leader (Black Hand) is a similar entity.[39] In Blackest Night #7, Nekron unearths a similar being known as the Entity. The Entity is the embodiment of the white light which creates life in Johns' creation story.[40] In the "Brightest Day" storyline, former guardian Krona is the entities' caretaker and immune to the emotional spectrum.[39] Although each of the emotional entities have their own distinct appearance, shape and form it was shown that under the influence of Krona, all of the emotional entities assumed the forms of snakes.

The embodiment of rageEdit

The Butcher,[41] the embodiment of rage, is connected to the red light of the emotional spectrum and resembles a demonic bull. It was created after the first murder,[42] and its head and horns resemble Red Lantern Corps insignia. The Butcher is first mentioned in the "Blackest Night" storyline in Green Lantern (vol. 4) #51. Atrocitus is mesmerized by the rage he senses in the Spectre when it is controlled by a black power ring. After a conflict with Parallax, Atrocitus tries to recruit the Spectre as his corps' entity. Although he is briefly infected by the uniform and characteristics of a Red Lantern, the Spectre throws it off, explaining that he is God's rage and does not belong to Atrocitus. He says he has faced "the crimson creature of anger", and Atrocitus will be destroyed if he seeks out the Butcher.[43]

The Butcher was found by the Spectre and Atrocitus, and its contained in Atrocitus' battery[44] until Krona captures it. Krona invades Oa and forces the Butcher to possess the Guardian of the Universe, Herupa. The Butcher is freed from Krona's control after Hal Jordan kills Krona.[45] The Butcher soon began suffering from a strange illness, later revealed to be the reservoir of the emotional spectrum was becoming exhausted. After Relic wiped out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drained the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery destroying the planet in the process, the Butcher sacrifices itself, by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall to repair the emotional spectrum.[46]

However it appears that a new rage entity has since been created from the excess rage left on Earth from the war with Atrocitus.[47] The entity, known as Red Dawn is (according to Atrocitus) still incubating in the center of planet Earth, but when it is born and grows, the new red entity will overwhelm Earth with rage.

The embodiment of greedEdit

Ophidian[41] is the embodiment of greed, the orange light of the emotional spectrum. The entity resembles a large serpent, with Orange Lantern insignia on its head. It was created when the first creature ate what it did not need.[42] In a Newsarama interview,[citation needed] Johns said that Ophidian lives in Larfleeze's battery, where Larfleeze trapped it, and that it speaks to Hal Jordan when he is overwhelmed by the orange light in Green Lantern (vol 4) #42.[48]

After escaping from prison, Hector Hammond tracks down Larfleeze and Hal Jordan under the control of Krona. Hammond consumes Larfleeze's battery, becoming Ophidian's host. Ophidian is freed from Krona's control when Hal Jordan kills the rogue guardian.[45] Ophidian soon begins suffering from a strange illness, later revealed to be the result of the exhaustion of the reservoir of the emotional spectrum. After Relic wipes out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drains the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery, destroying the planet in the process, Ophidian sacrifices itself by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall in order for the reservoir to be refilled.[46]

The embodiment of fearEdit

Parallax, the embodiment of fear, was born when one of the earliest life forms first felt terror,[42] and is connected to the yellow light of the emotional spectrum. Insect-like in appearance, the inside of its mouth resembles the Sinestro Corps symbol. In Green Lantern: Rebirth #3, Parallax is described as an entity of fear born at the beginning of sentience. Parallax creates fear in every civilization it encounters, threatening to trap the universe in a cycle of violence. The Guardians trap Parallax and seal it in the green Central Power Battery. Its presence in the battery causes the "yellow impurity" which historically have made Green Lantern Corps power rings useless against the color yellow.[49] It possesses Hal Jordan after Coast City is destroyed, causing him to kill nearly all of the Green Lantern Corps.[50]

At the end of Green Lantern: Rebirth, Jordan, Kyle Rayner, John Stewart, Kilowog and Guy Gardner fight Parallax and again imprison him in the green Central Power Battery.[51] Subsequently, Green Lantern learn they can overcome the yellow weakness by facing the fear behind it, a discipline that requires practice for new inductees into the Corps.[52]

Parallax is the first emotional entity captured by Krona. When Krona invades Oa with the entities and has them possess the Guardians, Parallax restores the central battery's impurity and gains control of the Green Lanterns. The only Lanterns able to resist are Hal Jordan, Guy Gardner, Kyle Rayner, John Stewart and Ganthet.[53] After Hal Jordan kills Krona, Parallax is removed from the green Battery,[45] and placed back in the yellow Central Battery.[54]

In the 2013 storyline "Wrath of the First Lantern", the First Lantern amasses enough power to rewrite reality, Sinestro releases Parallax from the Battery. Its new host, Sinestro uses Parallax to kill the Guardians of the Universe, except Ganthet.[55][56]

The embodiment of willpowerEdit

Ion, the embodiment of willpower, was born when life first moved of its own accord[42] and is the green light of the emotional spectrum. According to Ethan Van Sciver, it resembles a large, primitive whale or fish.[57] Representing the stability of willpower, Ion supports its host by providing power in return for willpower.[58] This contrasts with Parallax, who dominates its host.[49] Ion is featured in the "Sinestro Corps War" storyline, and is first seen when it is removed from Kyle Rayner.[59] The Guardians' insignia appears in a pattern on Ion's dorsal side, and it has a sea monk-like appendage ending in a lantern-like lure.[60]

After being taken from Rayner, Ion is held captive on Qward and the subject of experiments by the Anti-Monitor.[59] It is rescued by a team of Lanterns and returned to the Guardians of Oa, who bond the creature with Sodam Yat (a novice Green Lantern from the planet Daxam) to form a powerful weapon against Superboy-Prime.[60]

Ion is the second entity captured by Krona, who forces it to possess a Guardian of the Universe during Krona's invasion of Oa.[61] Ion is freed when Hal Jordan kills the rogue Guardian.[45] Ion has since returned to the Green Central Power Battery, only leaving it when the battery itself forcefully removed the green entity from it because it was suffering from a strange illness. When Relic, a native of a prior version of spacetime, began a quest to prevent the harnessing the Emotional Electromagnetic Spectrum energy, he revealed that the Emotional Spectrum had a reservoir that was becoming exhausted and it would eventually destroy the Universe. After Relic wiped out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drained the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery destroying the planet in the process, Ion sacrifices itself by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall in order for the reservoir to be refilled.[46]

Hal Jordan quits his membership in the Green Lantern Corps and began using Krona's Gauntlet, named for its creator, which harnessed the power of willpower in its rawest, most direct form, and for that same reason was deemed too dangerous, forcing the other Guardians to modify it into the modern rings given to their Corps. The gauntlet effectively makes Hal Jordan more powerful than ever, but it comes at a price: It is revealed that that having a direct line to the willpower of the universe begins to transform Hal into a being of the same energy, and it is likely that, if not prevented, Hal Jordan will eventually become the new entity of the green light.[volume & issue needed]

The embodiment of hopeEdit

Adara,[41] the embodiment of hope, is connected to the blue light of the emotional spectrum. Bird-like, it has the Blue Lantern Corps insignia on its chest. Adara first appears in the "Blackest Night" storyline, as Sinestro, transformed into a White Lantern, describes the creation of the emotional entities: it was created from the first prayer by a sentient being during a flood.[62]

Adara and Proselyte are later captured by Krona[44] and, after he invades Oa, Krona forces Adara to possess a Guardian of the Universe.[61] It is freed from Krona's control after Hal Jordan kills Krona.[45] Adara returns to the Blue Central Battery, only leaving it when Relic, a native of a prior version of spacetime, begins a quest to prevent the harnessing of the Emotional Electromagnetic Spectrum energy. In a subsequent storyline Adara suffers from a strange illness that is revealed to be caused by the exhaustion of the Emotional Spectrum's reservoir, which will eventually destroy the Universe. After Relic wipes out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drains the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery, destroying the planet in the process, Adara sacrifices itself by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall in order for the reservoir to be refilled.[46]

The embodiment of compassionEdit

Proselyte,[41] the embodiment of compassion, is connected to the indigo light of the emotional spectrum. The entity is explained simply: "Rage grows from murder. Hope from prayer. And at last, compassion is offered to us all." Its form is similar to a cephalopod, with four visible appendages, and its inner surface resembles the Indigo Tribe's insignia.[42]

Proselyte and Adara are captured by Krona.[44] After he invades Oa, Krona forces Proselyte to possess a Guardian of the Universe.[61] It is eventually freed from Krona's control after Hal Jordan kills Krona.[45] In a subsequent storyline Adara suffers from a strange illness that is revealed to be caused by the exhaustion of the Emotional Spectrum's reservoir, which will eventually destroy the Universe. After Relic wipes out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drains the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery, destroying the planet in the process, Proselyte sacrifices itself by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall in order for the reservoir to be refilled.[46]

The embodiment of loveEdit

The Predator, the embodiment of love, is connected to the violet light of the emotional spectrum. In an earlier continuity, an energy-projection being, Predator, is a masculine animus to the feminine anima of Star Sapphire. Despair over the loss of Hal Jordan drives the Predator to become a new individual, with Carol Ferris's ideal qualities in a man.[63]

In Green Lantern (vol. 4) #43 Scar indicates that the Star Sapphires have access to an emotional entity embodying love, which she calls the Predator. Although the Predator apparently lives with the Zamarons, its relationship with them is unclear. When Black Lantern rings reanimate the couple whose love fuels the Star Sapphires, the Zamarons are devastated, but the Predator escapes its crystalline containment.[64] It returns to the Zamarons and helps Carol Ferris prevent an invasion from Thanagar.[65] The Predator is captured by Krona,[66] who forces it to possess a Guardian of the Universe when he invades Oa, and is freed when Hal Jordan kills the rogue Guardian.[45] In a subsequent storyline Predator suffers from a strange illness that is revealed to be caused by the exhaustion of the Emotional Spectrum's reservoir, which will eventually destroy the Universe. After Relic wipes out the Blue Lantern Corps and forcefully drains the green light from Oa's Central Power Battery, destroying the planet in the process, Predator sacrifices itself by allowing Kyle Rayner to host it and pass into the Source Wall in order for the reservoir to be refilled.[46]

The embodiment of deathEdit

Nekron

Nekron is the embodiment of death in the universe and the Black Lantern Corps, which are powered by death.[67] Nekron uses necromancy to control the Black Lantern Corps to destroy life.[68][69]

Black Hand

Black Hand becomes the first Black Lantern and the embodiment of death, Nekron's link to the world.[70] His position is later taken by Hal Jordan, who sacrifices himself to escape the Dead Zone and stop the First Lantern Volthoom; Black Hand's body then crumbles into dust.[55] He again becomes the embodiment of death after the black ring revives him.[71]

The embodiment of lifeEdit

The Entity

The Entity, the manifestation of the white light which creates life, is the embodiment for the White Lantern Corps (which is powered by life).[72]

Kyle Rayner

Kyle learns to channel the seven lights of the emotional spectrum, developing the ability to harness the white light and becoming a White Lantern.[73]

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit