Emma Griffin

Emma Griffin is professor of modern British history at the University of East Anglia with particular interests in the industrial revolution and in social and gender history. She is the author of five books. Her second book, Blood Sport, was awarded the Lord Aberdare Prize for Literary History.[1] She is the President of the Royal Historical Society, and joint editor of The Historical Journal. She is part of the Living with Machines research project – a multi-disciplinary digital history project based at The Turing Institute and the British Library, which seeks to rethink the impact of technology on the lives of ordinary people during the Industrial Revolution.[2]

Emma Griffin

Professor
Emma Griffin 2020 007.jpg
Board member ofPresident of the Royal Historical Society
Spouse(s)David Milne
Children2
Academic background
Alma mater
Doctoral advisorGareth Stedman Jones
Academic work
DisciplineHistory
InstitutionsUniversity of Cambridge UEA

Education and academic positionsEdit

Griffin was educated at the University of London (where she studied history) and the University of Cambridge, having been a member of Trinity College. She held a British Academy postdoctoral fellowship and visiting positions at the University of Paris and Sheffield University before joining the University of East Anglia as a junior lecturer in 2005, where she is now Professor of modern British History. Griffin was the editor of History: The Journal of the Historical Association from 2010 to 2018. She has also edited Cultural and Social History and served as one of the Literary Directors of the Royal Historical Society, and is currently a co-editor of The Historical Journal.

Professional careerEdit

Griffin is a widely published historian of modern Britain, best known for her work on the lives of ordinary people in Britain during the industrial revolution. She has published five books and several articles in high impact journals, including Past & Present, The American Historical Review and The English Historical Review. She has performed active citizenship for the profession through her extensive editorial work for learned journals and service to learned societies, most notably the Royal Historical Society. She had made regular appearances on radio and television.

Earlier workEdit

Griffin's early work grew out of her 2000 Cambridge University PhD looking at popular recreation in Britain during the long eighteenth century. This resulted in two books: England’s Revelry: A History of Popular Sports and Pastimes, 1660–1800 (Oxford University Press, 2005)[3] and Blood Sport. A History of Hunting in Britain (Yale University Press, 2007)[4]

Liberty’s Dawn: A People’s History of the Industrial Revolution[5]Edit

In the 2010s, Griffin's work moved away from popular culture and started to focus on the British industrial revolution. In 2010, she published A Short History of the British Industrial Revolution (Palgrave, 2010),[6] in which she argued that the British industrial revolution occurred later than has commonly been claimed. Griffin argued that many of the great inventions of the industrial revolution were quite traditional in nature, and it was the development of the steam engine and the application of coal to industrial processes that marked the switch towards industrialisation proper. She dated this development to the 1830s, several decades later than many earlier attempts to date the industrial revolution.

In 2013, she published Liberty's Dawn: A People's History of the Industrial Revolution (Yale University Press, 2013), in which she turned attention away from the causes and timing of the industrial revolution to focus on the impact of industrialisation on the lives and standards of living of ordinary people. She argued against the pessimistic interpretation of the impact of industrialisation on standards of living. She subsequently developed this argument in an article for Past & Present. In this she made the observation that writing about the social consequences of the industrial revolution has become increasingly dominated by the field of Economic history. She argued that social and cultural approaches offer a valuable perspective that ought to be included. She took a family perspective and used working-class autobiographies as her evidence. In this way, she argued that traditional economic history methods are not sensitive enough to pick up the reality and complexity of living standards at the individual level.[7]

BroadcastingEdit

Griffin has appeared regularly on BBC radio and television as a contributor, writer and presenter. She is represented by agents at Knight Ayton and the Wylie Agency.[8]

Awards and decorationsEdit

  • 2001: Thirlwall Prize and Seeley Medal
  • 2005 Lord Aberdare Prize for Sport History for England's Revelry
  • 2007 Lord Aberdare Prize for Literary History for Blood Sport
  • 2012 AHRC/BBC New Generation Thinkers Award

Radio and televisionEdit

  • 2019: BBC Radio 4: The Motherhood Myth, writer and presenter[9]
  • 2018: BBC Radio 4: Mind the Gender Pay Gap, writer and presenter.[10]
  • 2018: BBC Radio 4: In our Time (The Workhouse).[11]
  • 2018: BBC Radio 3: Freethinking: What happened to the working class?
  • 2017: BBC Radio 3: A Reflection on Worrying, writer and presenter
  • 2017: BBC Radio 4: Clocking On, writer and presenter
  • 2015: BBC Radio 4: Voices of the Industrial Revolution: Women's stories, writer and presenter
  • 2015: BBC 1: Who do you Think You Are (Jerry Hall), contributor
  • 2015: BBC Radio 4: In Our Time (The American Civil War and Britain)
  • 2014: More 4: The Real Mill with Tony Robinson, consultant and co-presenter
  • 2014: BBC Radio 4: Voices of the Industrial Revolution, writer and presenter
  • 2012: BBC Radio 4: Out Foxed, writer and presenter.

Selected publicationsEdit

  • England's Revelry: A History of Popular Sports and Pastimes, 1660–1800 (Oxford University Press, 2005)[12]
  • Blood Sport. A History of Hunting in Britain (Yale University Press, 2007)[13]
  • A Short History of the British Industrial Revolution (Palgrave, 2010)[14]
  • Liberty's Dawn: A People's History of the Industrial Revolution (Yale University Press, 2013)
  • Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale University Press, 2020)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Prizes - Sports History". www.sportinhistory.org.
  2. ^ "About Living with Machines – Living with Machines". livingwithmachines.ac.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  3. ^ Griffin, Emma (11 August 2005). England's Revelry: A History of Popular Sports and Pastimes, 1660-1830. British Academy. doi:10.5871/bacad/9780197263211.001.0001. ISBN 9780191734427.
  4. ^ de Belin, Mandy (25 October 2008). "Emma Griffin, Blood Sport: Hunting in Britain Since 1066, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2007. 283 pp. £19.99. 978 0 300 11628 1". Rural History. 19 (2): 236–237. doi:10.1017/S0956793308002525.
  5. ^ Griffin, Emma (2013). Liberty's Dawn: A People's History of the Industrial Revolution. Macmillan Education. ISBN 9781352003109.
  6. ^ "A Short History of the British Industrial Revolution". Macmillan International Higher Education.
  7. ^ Griffin, Emma (1 May 2018). "Diets, Hunger and Living Standards During the British Industrial Revolution". Past & Present. 239 (1): 71–111. doi:10.1093/pastj/gtx061. ISSN 0031-2746. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  8. ^ "TV Presenter Agents in the UK - Knight Ayton". knightayton.co.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  9. ^ "An Alternative History of Mothering". www.bbc.co.uk. BBC. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  10. ^ "Mind the Gender Pay Gap". www.bbc.co.uk. BBC. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  11. ^ "In Our Time". www.bbc.co.uk. BBC. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  12. ^ Griffin, Emma (11 August 2005). England's Revelry: A History of Popular Sports and Pastimes, 1660–1830. British Academy. doi:10.5871/bacad/9780197263211.001.0001. ISBN 9780191734427.
  13. ^ de Belin, Mandy (October 25, 2008). "Emma Griffin, Blood Sport: Hunting in Britain Since 1066, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2007. 283 pp. £19.99. 978 0 300 11628 1". Rural History. 19 (2): 236–237. doi:10.1017/S0956793308002525.
  14. ^ "A Short History of the British Industrial Revolution". Macmillan International Higher Education.

External linksEdit

Academic offices
Preceded by
Margot Finn
President of the Royal Historical Society
2020–2024 }