Embassy of the United States, Beijing

The Embassy of the United States in Beijing is the diplomatic mission of the United States in China. It serves as the administrative office of the United States Ambassador to China. The embassy complex is in Chaoyang District, Beijing.[1]

Embassy of the United States, Beijing
美国驻华大使馆
Seal of an Embassy of the United States of America.svg
Wider Photograph of Chancery Office Building Showing Glass Curtain Wall large.jpg
Embassy as seen from above
Location55 Anjialou Road
China Beijing, China
Coordinates39°57′11″N 116°27′32″E / 39.953°N 116.459°E / 39.953; 116.459Coordinates: 39°57′11″N 116°27′32″E / 39.953°N 116.459°E / 39.953; 116.459
Embassy of the United States, Beijing is located in China
Embassy of the United States, Beijing
Location of Embassy of the United States, Beijing
美国驻华大使馆 in China

In addition to Beijing, it covers the municipalities of Tianjin and Chongqing and the provinces of Gansu, Guizhou, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Inner Mongolia, Jiangxi, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shanxi, Shaanxi, Shandong Sichuan, Tibet Autonomous Region, Xinjiang, and Yunnan.[2]

HistoryEdit

 
Photograph taken inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing of Ambassador Gary Locke with Chen Guangcheng

The current U.S. Embassy in Beijing was opened and dedicated on August 8, 2008, by U.S. President George W. Bush[3] and is the third largest American diplomatic mission in the world, after the Embassy of the United States, Baghdad and the Embassy of the United States, Yerevan. The U.S. embassy had its origins in 1935 when the legation was upgraded into the embassy in Nanjing. However, the central government of the nationalists was relocated to Taipei in 1949 due to the Chinese Civil War and the embassy was reopened in 1953. On January 1, 1979, the embassy was transferred to Beijing after normalizing relations with the communist government on the mainland.[4]

The 500,000-square-foot (46,000 m2), eight story facility incorporates a great deal of free-standing transparent and opaque glass in its design. It is located on a 10-acre (4.0 ha) plot of land. The embassy warehouse is located in the Beijing Tianzhu Airport Industrial Zone in Shunyi District.[5]

Since the embassy is legally out of reach of the Government of China, it was used as the hiding place of Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng after he escaped from house arrest.[6]

Principal officersEdit

AmbassadorsEdit

Deputy Chiefs of Mission (DCM)Edit

Name Portrait Start of term End of term
J. Stapleton Roy   1979 1981[7][8]
Chas W. Freeman, Jr.   1981 1984[9]
Herbert E. Horowitz   1984 1986[10]
Peter Tomsen   1986 1989[11]
Raymond Burghardt
(acting)
  1989 1989[12][13]
B. Lynn Pascoe   1989[12] 1992[n 1]
Scott S. Hallford 1992[n 1] 1996[14]
William C. McCahill, Jr. 1996 1999
G. Eugene Martin 1999 2000[15]
Michael W. Marine   September 2000 June 2004[16]
David S. Sedney   2004 2007[17]
Dan Piccuta May 2007[18] January 2009
William Weinstein
(Acting)
January 2009[19] July 2009[20]: 74 
Robert Goldberg July 2009[20]: 74  2011[20]: 5 
Robert S. Wang   January 2011 August 2013[21]
Daniel Kritenbrink   July 2013 2015[22]
David H. Rank January 2016[23] January 2017
Julie L. Kavanagh
(Acting)
January 2017[24][25] June 2017[24]
Jonathan Fritz
(Acting)
  June 2017[26] 2018
Robert W. Forden   July 2018 October 2020[27]
William Klein
(Acting)
  October 2020[28] October 2021
Bobby Richey
(Acting)
  October 2021 [29]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Note 1^ :State Department rocords for foreign serive list indicates that Deputy Chief of Mission in Beijing changed from B. Lynn Pascoe to Scott S. Hallford between Spring 1992 and Fall 1992.[30][31]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Contact Us." Embassy of the United States, Beijing. Retrieved on October 21, 2012. "No. 55 An Jia Lou Lu 100600" - Address in Chinese: "北京安家楼路55号 邮编:100600"
  2. ^ "Emergency Contacts – All Locations". U.S. Embassy in China. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  3. ^ "New U.S. Embassy in Beijing dedicated." Associated Press at the Los Angeles Times. August 8, 2008. Retrieved on October 18, 2012.
  4. ^ "U.S. Embassy Beijing, China - National Museum of American Diplomacy".
  5. ^ "U.S. Embassy Auction." () U.S. State Department. "U.S. Embassy Warehouse – No.18 Tianzhu Road, Area A, Beijing Tianzhu Airport Industrial Zone Shunyi, Beijing (See attached map)" and "北京市顺义区天竺空港工业区A区天柱路18号"
  6. ^ Chin, Josh (April 29, 2012). "China cracks down after Chen escape". wsj.com.
  7. ^ "Roy is named executive secretary of Department". State Magazine. Bureau of Personnel, U.S. Department of State (322): 17. 1989.
  8. ^ "Biography:J. Stapleton Roy". 1997-2001.state.gov. Archived from the original on August 2, 2018. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  9. ^ "Chas W. Freeman, Jr". American Academy of Diplomacy. Archived from the original on April 23, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  10. ^ "Foreign Affairs Oral History Project: AMBASSADOR HERBERT E. HOROWITZ" (PDF). Charles Stuart Kennedy. The Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST). December 9, 1992. p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 4, 2021. Retrieved December 4, 2021.
  11. ^ George Bush (June 5, 1989). "Accordance of the Personal Rank of Ambassador to Peter Tomsen While Serving as Special Envoy to the Afghan Resistance". White House. Archived from the original on January 11, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  12. ^ a b "Foreign Affairs Oral History Project: AMBASSADOR JAMES R. LILLEY" (PDF). Charles Stuart Kennedy. The Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST). May 21, 1998. pp. 136–137. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2020. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  13. ^ "Key Officers of Foreign Service Posts: Guide for Business Representatives", United States Department of State, no. Publication 7877, p. 10, 1989
  14. ^ "Retirements (November)". State Magazine. U.S. Department of State (400): 82. 1996.
  15. ^ "Foreign Affairs Oral History Project: G. EUGENE MARTIN" (PDF). Charles Stuart Kennedy. The Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST). September 21, 1999. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 6, 2021. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  16. ^ "Michael W. Marine: Ambassador, Socialist Republic of Vie". U.S. Department of State. December 13, 2004. Archived from the original on December 12, 2008. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  17. ^ "David S. Sedney: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Afghanistan, Pakistan and Central Asia". U.S. Department of Defense. Archived from the original on January 13, 2013. Retrieved January 13, 2013.
  18. ^ "CHARGE D'AFFAIRES A.I.: Dan Piccuta". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on June 17, 2009. Retrieved June 17, 2009.
  19. ^ "ACTING DEPUTY CHIEF OF MISSION: William Weinstein". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on June 15, 2009. Retrieved June 15, 2009.
  20. ^ a b c "Foreign Affairs Oral History Project: ROBERT GOLDBERG" (PDF). David Reuther. The Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST). September 15, 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 10, 2021. Retrieved December 10, 2021.
  21. ^ "Robert S. Wang: U.S. Senior Official for Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs". United States Department of State. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  22. ^ "Ambassador Dan Kritenbrink". U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Vietnam. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  23. ^ "Chargé d'affaires David H. Rank". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on April 26, 2017. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  24. ^ a b "Julie L. Kavanagh: Diplomat in Residence for Texas" (PDF). World Affairs Council of Austin. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 11, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  25. ^ "Acting Deputy Chief of Mission Julie L. Kavanagh". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on April 26, 2017. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  26. ^ Carol Morello (June 5, 2017). "Senior diplomat in Beijing embassy resigns over Trump's climate change decision". Washington Post. Archived from the original on April 7, 2021. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  27. ^ "Deputy Chief of Mission Robert W. Forden". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved April 13, 2019.
  28. ^ "Acting Deputy Chief of Mission William Klein". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in China. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved April 29, 2021.
  29. ^ "ACTING DEPUTY CHIEF OF MISSION BOBBY RICHEY, JR". Embassy of the United States, Beijing. October 2020. Archived from the original on November 23, 2021. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  30. ^ "Key Officers of Foreign Service Posts: Guide for Business Representatives. Spring 1992", United States Department of State, no. Publication 7877, p. 23, 1992
  31. ^ "Key Officers of Foreign Service Posts: Guide for Business Representatives. Fall 1992", United States Department of State, no. Publication 7877, p. 24, 1992

External linksEdit